grain boundary effects measurements

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BernardIE5317

Audiophyte
Thank you for this fine site May I please inquire if the often stated by some of frequency dependent electrical noise effects due to conductor grain boundary crossing has been measured and published by yourself? If so please be so kind as to direct me to the page with said results. Thank You Kindly - Cheerios
 
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BernardIE5317

Audiophyte
I direct you to the sites found via a web search of "electrical properties of grain boundaries" The fiber content of Cheerios is already well known though I prefer oatmeal - Cheerios
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
I direct you to the sites found via a web search of "electrical properties of grain boundaries" The fiber content of Cheerios is already well known though I prefer oatmeal - Cheerios
You are either winding us up, or have been taken in by some Audiophool hoax. There is no such thing as an electrical "grain boundary."
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
You are either winding us up, or have been taken in by some Audiophool hoax. There is no such thing as an electrical "grain boundary."
I can't wait to see someone come here to say that grain boundary effect works on the quantum level, causing diffraction of the electron paths. That must cause delays on the level of, well, zero WRT anything we're dealing with.

I can't imagine living in a world where electrons are smashed into the corners of the Copper grains and crushed by the others that are just trying to get on with their job of moving through a conductor.

Oh, the horror!o_O
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
Well, this is what it is all about.

It is about the effects of the crystal boundaries in grown graphene sheets used in semiconductor devices. The conclusion of all this is that there is no significant effect.

If there was, there were be no way to test this specific effect on equipment under test.

So, after much pressery on the nettery, and deep thaukus, there is no screechy tweetery, or woofery fluttery. That is the fundamold. (With acknowledgement to the late Stanley Unwin.)
 
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highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Overlord
Well, this is what it is all about.

It is about the effects of the crystal boundaries in grown graphene sheets used in semiconductor devices. The conclusion of all this is that there is no significant effect.

If there was, there were be no way to test this specific effect on equipment under test.

So, after much pressery on the nettery, and deep thaukus, there is no screechy tweetery, or woofery fluttery. That is the fundamold. (With acknowledgement to the late Stanley Unwin.)
The question that people need to understand- "How do you test test equipment and what equipment is used to make sure the items being tested are the most accurate in the history of test equipment?".

New sales pitch- "These are the cableiest cables we have had the privilege to listen to".........oy
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Overlord
Thank you for this fine site May I please inquire if the often stated by some of frequency dependent electrical noise effects due to conductor grain boundary crossing has been measured and published by yourself? If so please be so kind as to direct me to the page with said results. Thank You Kindly - Cheerios
"Often stated"? Where? Grain boundary? Cheerios??

Haw..?
 
Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Overlord
Well, this is what it is all about.

It is about the effects of the crystal boundaries in grown graphene sheets used in semiconductor devices. The conclusion of all this is that there is no significant effect.

If there was, there were be no way to test this specific effect on equipment under test.

So, after much pressery on the nettery, and deep thaukus, there is no screechy tweetery, or woofery fluttery. That is the fundamold. (With acknowledgement to the late Stanley Unwin.)
Is this a cable thing??
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
Is this a cable thing??
It would be a semiconductor IC thing, I think. I was not aware of cables made of graphite used in audio. The only cables I was aware of that use graphite are sparking plug cables. Now I see there are graphite audio cables being offered for sale. Touted with the usual suspect claims: - More detail, more sparkle!
 
CajunLB

CajunLB

Full Audioholic
It would be a semiconductor IC thing, I think. I was not aware of cables made of graphite used in audio. The only cables I was aware of that use graphite are sparking plug cables. Now I see there are graphite audio cables being offered for sale. Touted with the usual suspect claims: - More detail, more sparkle!
More Chocolatey mids?
 
B

Beave

Senior Audioholic
I feel sorry for you guys who can't hear the friction between electrons. You must have poor hearing, or else your equipment just isn't resolving enough.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
I feel sorry for you guys who can't hear the friction between electrons. You must have poor hearing, or else your equipment just isn't resolving enough.
I thought they keep their distance from one another, no?
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
Yes, this effect was discussed by Jneutron and Jon Rich perhaps at AA and maybe here many years ago. Jneutron of a national lab on the east coast measures stuff in the nano amps perhaps if memory is correct but the grain boundary effect in human brain is unreliable in my skull. ;) :D

And the OP is nowhere. :eek:
 
Eppie

Eppie

Full Audioholic
For some strange reason I'm compelled to think of the song "Every sperm is sacred" from Monty Python's The Meaning of Life, substituting sperm with electron.
 
B

BernardIE5317

Audiophyte
Subjective experience is not a reliable indicator of objective reality
Objective reality is not a reliable indicator of subjective experience

speaker: Spendor A7 also Spendor BC1
receiver: Cambridge Audio Topaz ST20
receiver upgradte coming soon: VTL IT-85
CD player: Cambridge Audio Topaz CD10
turntable: Bang & Olufson Beogram RX
speaker cables: SKW 6N OCC no lamp cord for me
interconnects: SKW 6N OCC
power cord coming soon: SKW 6N OCC
all cables low in fiber with no grain content whatsoever
isolation transformer: Tripp Lite Standard
 
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Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Overlord
Object reality is not a reliable indicator of subjective experience

speaker: Spendor A7 also Spendor BC1
receiver: Cambridge Audio Topaz ST20
receiver upgradte coming soon: VTL IT-85
CD player: Cambridge Audio Topaz CD10
turntable: Bang & Olufson Beogram RX
speaker cables: SKW 6N OCC no lamp cord for me
interconnects: SKW 6N OCC
power cord coming soon: SKW 6N OCC
all cables low in fiber with no grain content whatsoever
isolation transformer: Tripp Lite Standard
This is very true. Placebo and expectation bias easily color the subjective experience and is a well known phenomenon. That's why I would trust a DBT result over sighted testing.
 
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BernardIE5317

Audiophyte
That's why I would trust a DBT result over sighted testing.
This is very true as would I but isn't a double blind test a test of subjective experience or does one do a DBT with an objective reality measuring oscilloscope stuck into one's ear?
 

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