Good vibes about the Nakamichi Shockwafe Ultra 9.2

Calvert

Calvert

Audioholic
Ratings
15 1
#1
Hearing a lot of good about the Nakamichi Shockwafe Ultra 9.2. Seems to being catching the publics eye.
 
J

Justmy002

Enthusiast
Ratings
4
#2
Been seeing a lot people talking about it too! Both over here and on avsforum. I was one of the preorder customers for the Shockwafe Ultra 9.2. The surround sound and quality of this product, together with my very positive correspondences with Nakamichi (I asked their support a few questions during set-up),have transformed my perception of Nakamichi from a slight skeptic into a super loyal fan. I'm pasting my review of Shockwafe 9.2 here:

First of all, one should not look at this as a soundbar, but more of a complete surround sound system for your home theater. The value is crazy with 2 subwoofers, 4 surround speakers and a soundbar.

I have used it for slightly over a week now and played quite a few movies including Dolby Atmos ones. In a nutshell, it is probably the best hardware purchase I have made this year. The surround sound quality is unbelievable, I have never imagined a soundbar system to be able to deliver a soundstage that’s so clear, detailed and spacious. Incredible. The additional subwoofer has made a huge difference and I’m super impressed at how much bass this system can crank. Overall, it feels like my living room has become alive after installing this system. Watching movies is more thrilling and delightful for everyone in the family now because of the extra excitement and intensity this system has added. I honestly think that this is something every large 4K HDTV owner needs to consider getting.

My setup:
- LG 65” 4K OLED TV
- Samsung UBD-M9500 bluray player
- PS4 Pro
- Nakamichi Shockwafe Ultra 9.2 DTS:X sound bar

Out of the box, the first thing I noticed was the build quality of all the components of the system. They all felt and looked really premium. Setting it up was easy and seamless versus using an AVR (which I was originally considering to buy),with very similar home theater results achieved. My 24x24 living room is now rid of a lot of cables and equipment that would have been necessary had I chosen an AVR. I really like the unique, sleek design of the soundbar and it looks great sitting below my TV.

I have only been using the dipole configuration for the 4 surround speakers. I know that if they are placed individually, according to the company’s recommendation, you will get an even more complete surround sound coverage. And I’ll try that soon. Nevertheless, this system is hands down one of the best surround sound systems out there. The construction of the surround speakers looks strong and heavy, similar to my old Fluance Signature Series bipolar surrounds. So each of the 4 surround speakers has a tweeter and a full-range driver, meaning that just from a hardware point of view, I have EIGHT speaker drivers placed by my sides that are reproducing surround sound effects, not forgetting the soundbar in front as well as the 2x10” subs. Forget about all those ‘simulated’ surround sound capabilities that many other systems promise you. Nothing beats true surround and we all know that.

I started testing out the system by playing my Mad Max: Fury Road bluray. The movie combines the sounds of many engines, vehicles, gunfire, explosions and flying debris into a rich hemisphere of sound. Since it does not have Dolby Atmos, I was also curious to see how well the system could handle Atmos movies. And I was more than impressed. Despite not having support for Atmos, it actually performed better than my old Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos soundbar. The Neural:X upmixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support. During the opening scene, I was instantly awed by the system’s sound directionality when there were voices coming from many directions, followed by the roar of the vehicle that flew above shortly after. Everything sounded precise and natural. From the gentle breeze of the deserts during quieter scenes to the thunderous dust storms and battles, I always felt like I was right in the center of the action. The dialogue was full and crystal clear. With the 2x10” subs, the bass is indeed second to none. Low-frequency effects come thick and fast and are tight and controlled. During many of the battle scenes, I thought to myself that I have never experienced a home theater system that could produce such deep, resonant rumbles. For certain bassy audio tracks that might be challenging for some subwoofers to handle, this system can reproduce effortlessly.

Overall, I’m extremely pleased with the system. For $1,099, the value is crazy with 2x10" subs, 4 surround speakers, and a soundbar. It is like a $3-4k+ system without the hassles. I also have to praise the company’s customer support team, who was very responsive when I asked them a couple of questions while setting up the system. Highly recommend!
 
Last edited:
taylor3397

taylor3397

Audiophyte
#3
I'm a bit confused about some of the comments that I have read about the Nakamichi Shockwafe DTS:X Ultra 9.2 Soundbar. Firstly, my TV is similar to yours (although I don't know what year yours is - which is important.) I have the OLED55 E6P which is LG's 2016 4K 3D OLED - meaning it does NOT support Dolby Atmos. If you have the following year's model, it DOES support Dolby Atmos.) I also have a PS3, an older Sony 5.1 sound system, and I'm considering getting the Xbox One X to get support for Atmos.

Now, I was overjoyed when I read EVERYTHING about the Nakamichi 9.2 as it had everything in my price range that I wanted/needed - until I saw that it did not support Dolby Atmos. (And I agree with your comment that the Nakamichi 9.2 is more of a surround sound system than a soundbar.) The first quote below is from your review, and the 2nd one is from Tony Leotta's review in audioholics.com of Nov 8, 2017:


"I started testing out the system by playing my Mad Max: Fury Road Bluray. The movie combines the sounds of many engines, vehicles, gunfire, explosions and flying debris into a rich hemisphere of sound. Since it has Dolby Atmos, I was also curious to see how well the system could handle Atmos movies. And I was more than impressed. Despite not having support for Atmos, it actually performed better than my old Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos soundbar. The Neural:X up-mixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support."

LEOTTA:
"It would be unfortunate if some people just read the highlights when shopping soundbar systems looking for immersive sound labeling and move on to a likely inferior product just because it is labeled Dolby Atmos. We caution consumers not to fall into this trap at the risk of missing some potentially great products like that seem to get the basics right like this one does..."

Here is where my confusion comes in. As I understand it, Dolby Atmos and dts:x are two different ways to engineer or mix sound in a movie coming out of the studio for the theater and/or for the BluRay disc when mass distribution starts. The two different methods are produced by different companies and have different features. Some suggest that a "format war" will emerge over time wherein one will "win" over the other. Personally, I think dts:x is the better format, but the reality is that there are 5x more Atmos discs on the market than there are dts:x discs - so for that reason (& not because I have a 'shopping list' of indiscriminate "immersive sound labels"),I would like BOTH Atmos and dts:x.

As it relates to your quote, the underlined/highlighted part is what confuses me. How could the Nakamichi system "handle" the Atmos part of the Mad Max disc AT ALL when it is not engineered to process it?? I would assume that it would "handle" it the same way that my current system does, i.e., not at all. However, I do not want to miss a superior product because of a misunderstanding on my part. Given that you had what was once considered THE BEST sound bar of all, the Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos-enabled soundbar (which I almost bought but stopped when I realized it would take up too much room),is what you are really saying is that the Nakamichi out-performs other systems (including those which support both Atmos and dts:x) because, "The Neural:X up-mixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support." In other words, are you saying that the Atmos tracks are completely ignored by Nakamichi's systems but that this is irrelevant because all of the other components of the system more than compensate for that omission? Also, is there any part of you which wished the Nakamichi was enabled for BOTH Atmos and dts:x?

A third consumer reviewer wrote that, "The bass and surround effects this thing gives off make you forget about the occasional Atmos effect. It totally surrounds you with sound and if you place the speakers in the 9.2 configuration and have them high enough you will still get the Atmos effects only better in my opinion." Again, I don't think is just a matter of semantics. How can the listener get "the Atmos effects, only better" when the Nakamichi system is NOT engineered to pick up the Atmos format, and therefore is not capable of utilizing Atmos at all?

I have been sadly holding out for months now for a system just like Nakamichi's, but one that will enable both Atmos and dts:x content. I have even considered going back to an A/V receiver, speaker wire, installing speakers at ceiling level, etc. so that I can truly process a modified version of Dolby Atmos and dts:x (many A/V receivers currently support both). But I truly don't think my room configuration will lend itself to that, and I really don't want all that wire again.

Finally, if I was to buy this system, I am stuck with it since I live in Canada. It's hard enough to find a place that sells the Shockwafe 9.2 here, let alone one which will assist with Warranty issues, possible return issues for malfunctioning parts out-of-the-box, etc. You mentioned being very pleased with your interactions with Tech Support at Nakamichi. Could I bother you for their address or phone number?

If I knew I wasn't "wasting" the engineering of Dolby Atmos on all the the many blu-ray discs, past and future; AND, if I knew that Nakamichi's system can give me as good an immersive experience as those which enable BOTH Atmos and dts:x, I'd buy it tomorrow. I want this system primarily for movies, and what I want most in watching these movies is to feel as immersed in them as possible. In reading your review a third time, I think that's what you are actually saying, i.e., that the Nakamichi compensates for the loss of Atmos sound by adding other components which makes the immersion just as good. Correct?? Also, have you been able to listen to any streaming movies with 3D-enabled SOUND (on Netflix & YouTube),and if so, what was the experience like (and do you have the 2016 or 2017 version of LG's 4K OLED TV?)

Any thoughts from any other readers as to whether I should continue holding out?? Lastly, has anyone heard whether Nakamichi will be adding Atmos in future products? Many thanks!
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
1,208 4 1
#4
I'm a bit confused about some of the comments that I have read about the Nakamichi Shockwafe DTS:X Ultra 9.2 Soundbar. Firstly, my TV is similar to yours (although I don't know what year yours is - which is important.) I have the OLED55 E6P which is LG's 2016 4K 3D OLED - meaning it does NOT support Dolby Atmos. If you have the following year's model, it DOES support Dolby Atmos.) I also have a PS3, an older Sony 5.1 sound system, and I'm considering getting the Xbox One X to get support for Atmos.

Now, I was overjoyed when I read EVERYTHING about the Nakamichi 9.2 as it had everything in my price range that I wanted/needed - until I saw that it did not support Dolby Atmos. (And I agree with your comment that the Nakamichi 9.2 is more of a surround sound system than a soundbar.) The first quote below is from your review, and the 2nd one is from Tony Leotta's review in audioholics.com of Nov 8, 2017:


"I started testing out the system by playing my Mad Max: Fury Road Bluray. The movie combines the sounds of many engines, vehicles, gunfire, explosions and flying debris into a rich hemisphere of sound. Since it has Dolby Atmos, I was also curious to see how well the system could handle Atmos movies. And I was more than impressed. Despite not having support for Atmos, it actually performed better than my old Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos soundbar. The Neural:X up-mixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support."

LEOTTA:
"It would be unfortunate if some people just read the highlights when shopping soundbar systems looking for immersive sound labeling and move on to a likely inferior product just because it is labeled Dolby Atmos. We caution consumers not to fall into this trap at the risk of missing some potentially great products like that seem to get the basics right like this one does..."

Here is where my confusion comes in. As I understand it, Dolby Atmos and dts:x are two different ways to engineer or mix sound in a movie coming out of the studio for the theater and/or for the BluRay disc when mass distribution starts. The two different methods are produced by different companies and have different features. Some suggest that a "format war" will emerge over time wherein one will "win" over the other. Personally, I think dts:x is the better format, but the reality is that there are 5x more Atmos discs on the market than there are dts:x discs - so for that reason (& not because I have a 'shopping list' of indiscriminate "immersive sound labels"),I would like BOTH Atmos and dts:x.

As it relates to your quote, the underlined/highlighted part is what confuses me. How could the Nakamichi system "handle" the Atmos part of the Mad Max disc AT ALL when it is not engineered to process it?? I would assume that it would "handle" it the same way that my current system does, i.e., not at all. However, I do not want to miss a superior product because of a misunderstanding on my part. Given that you had what was once considered THE BEST sound bar of all, the Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos-enabled soundbar (which I almost bought but stopped when I realized it would take up too much room),is what you are really saying is that the Nakamichi out-performs other systems (including those which support both Atmos and dts:x) because, "The Neural:X up-mixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support." In other words, are you saying that the Atmos tracks are completely ignored by Nakamichi's systems but that this is irrelevant because all of the other components of the system more than compensate for that omission? Also, is there any part of you which wished the Nakamichi was enabled for BOTH Atmos and dts:x?

A third consumer reviewer wrote that, "The bass and surround effects this thing gives off make you forget about the occasional Atmos effect. It totally surrounds you with sound and if you place the speakers in the 9.2 configuration and have them high enough you will still get the Atmos effects only better in my opinion." Again, I don't think is just a matter of semantics. How can the listener get "the Atmos effects, only better" when the Nakamichi system is NOT engineered to pick up the Atmos format, and therefore is not capable of utilizing Atmos at all?

I have been sadly holding out for months now for a system just like Nakamichi's, but one that will enable both Atmos and dts:x content. I have even considered going back to an A/V receiver, speaker wire, installing speakers at ceiling level, etc. so that I can truly process a modified version of Dolby Atmos and dts:x (many A/V receivers currently support both). But I truly don't think my room configuration will lend itself to that, and I really don't want all that wire again.

Finally, if I was to buy this system, I am stuck with it since I live in Canada. It's hard enough to find a place that sells the Shockwafe 9.2 here, let alone one which will assist with Warranty issues, possible return issues for malfunctioning parts out-of-the-box, etc. You mentioned being very pleased with your interactions with Tech Support at Nakamichi. Could I bother you for their address or phone number?

If I knew I wasn't "wasting" the engineering of Dolby Atmos on all the the many blu-ray discs, past and future; AND, if I knew that Nakamichi's system can give me as good an immersive experience as those which enable BOTH Atmos and dts:x, I'd buy it tomorrow. I want this system primarily for movies, and what I want most in watching these movies is to feel as immersed in them as possible. In reading your review a third time, I think that's what you are actually saying, i.e., that the Nakamichi compensates for the loss of Atmos sound by adding other components which makes the immersion just as good. Correct?? Also, have you been able to listen to any streaming movies with 3D-enabled SOUND (on Netflix & YouTube),and if so, what was the experience like (and do you have the 2016 or 2017 version of LG's 4K OLED TV?)

Any thoughts from any other readers as to whether I should continue holding out?? Lastly, has anyone heard whether Nakamichi will be adding Atmos in future products? Many thanks!
In looking at their literature, it is a little confusing, but it seems to me they’re still using some of the old bounce the sound off the walls tricks, and you mentioned a funky room so I don’t know that you’ll get good results. I also don’t believe for one second that this will give you the immersive experience you want. I have no doubt that as far as soundbars go, it’s a great one, and it seems to be well thought out with configurable surrounds and dual subs, and probably is convincing in a traditional surround sound way. But IMO if you really want a true immersive playback system, you have to actually build an immersive playback system.
 
J

Justmy002

Enthusiast
Ratings
4
#5
I'm a bit confused about some of the comments that I have read about the Nakamichi Shockwafe DTS:X Ultra 9.2 Soundbar. Firstly, my TV is similar to yours (although I don't know what year yours is - which is important.) I have the OLED55 E6P which is LG's 2016 4K 3D OLED - meaning it does NOT support Dolby Atmos. If you have the following year's model, it DOES support Dolby Atmos.) I also have a PS3, an older Sony 5.1 sound system, and I'm considering getting the Xbox One X to get support for Atmos.

Now, I was overjoyed when I read EVERYTHING about the Nakamichi 9.2 as it had everything in my price range that I wanted/needed - until I saw that it did not support Dolby Atmos. (And I agree with your comment that the Nakamichi 9.2 is more of a surround sound system than a soundbar.) The first quote below is from your review, and the 2nd one is from Tony Leotta's review in audioholics.com of Nov 8, 2017:


"I started testing out the system by playing my Mad Max: Fury Road Bluray. The movie combines the sounds of many engines, vehicles, gunfire, explosions and flying debris into a rich hemisphere of sound. Since it has Dolby Atmos, I was also curious to see how well the system could handle Atmos movies. And I was more than impressed. Despite not having support for Atmos, it actually performed better than my old Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos soundbar. The Neural:X up-mixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support."

LEOTTA:
"It would be unfortunate if some people just read the highlights when shopping soundbar systems looking for immersive sound labeling and move on to a likely inferior product just because it is labeled Dolby Atmos. We caution consumers not to fall into this trap at the risk of missing some potentially great products like that seem to get the basics right like this one does..."

Here is where my confusion comes in. As I understand it, Dolby Atmos and dts:x are two different ways to engineer or mix sound in a movie coming out of the studio for the theater and/or for the BluRay disc when mass distribution starts. The two different methods are produced by different companies and have different features. Some suggest that a "format war" will emerge over time wherein one will "win" over the other. Personally, I think dts:x is the better format, but the reality is that there are 5x more Atmos discs on the market than there are dts:x discs - so for that reason (& not because I have a 'shopping list' of indiscriminate "immersive sound labels"),I would like BOTH Atmos and dts:x.

As it relates to your quote, the underlined/highlighted part is what confuses me. How could the Nakamichi system "handle" the Atmos part of the Mad Max disc AT ALL when it is not engineered to process it?? I would assume that it would "handle" it the same way that my current system does, i.e., not at all. However, I do not want to miss a superior product because of a misunderstanding on my part. Given that you had what was once considered THE BEST sound bar of all, the Yamaha YSP-5600 Atmos-enabled soundbar (which I almost bought but stopped when I realized it would take up too much room),is what you are really saying is that the Nakamichi out-performs other systems (including those which support both Atmos and dts:x) because, "The Neural:X up-mixing the sound to 9.2ch and the 4 surround speakers more than make up for the lack of Atmos support." In other words, are you saying that the Atmos tracks are completely ignored by Nakamichi's systems but that this is irrelevant because all of the other components of the system more than compensate for that omission? Also, is there any part of you which wished the Nakamichi was enabled for BOTH Atmos and dts:x?

A third consumer reviewer wrote that, "The bass and surround effects this thing gives off make you forget about the occasional Atmos effect. It totally surrounds you with sound and if you place the speakers in the 9.2 configuration and have them high enough you will still get the Atmos effects only better in my opinion." Again, I don't think is just a matter of semantics. How can the listener get "the Atmos effects, only better" when the Nakamichi system is NOT engineered to pick up the Atmos format, and therefore is not capable of utilizing Atmos at all?

I have been sadly holding out for months now for a system just like Nakamichi's, but one that will enable both Atmos and dts:x content. I have even considered going back to an A/V receiver, speaker wire, installing speakers at ceiling level, etc. so that I can truly process a modified version of Dolby Atmos and dts:x (many A/V receivers currently support both). But I truly don't think my room configuration will lend itself to that, and I really don't want all that wire again.

Finally, if I was to buy this system, I am stuck with it since I live in Canada. It's hard enough to find a place that sells the Shockwafe 9.2 here, let alone one which will assist with Warranty issues, possible return issues for malfunctioning parts out-of-the-box, etc. You mentioned being very pleased with your interactions with Tech Support at Nakamichi. Could I bother you for their address or phone number?

If I knew I wasn't "wasting" the engineering of Dolby Atmos on all the the many blu-ray discs, past and future; AND, if I knew that Nakamichi's system can give me as good an immersive experience as those which enable BOTH Atmos and dts:x, I'd buy it tomorrow. I want this system primarily for movies, and what I want most in watching these movies is to feel as immersed in them as possible. In reading your review a third time, I think that's what you are actually saying, i.e., that the Nakamichi compensates for the loss of Atmos sound by adding other components which makes the immersion just as good. Correct?? Also, have you been able to listen to any streaming movies with 3D-enabled SOUND (on Netflix & YouTube),and if so, what was the experience like (and do you have the 2016 or 2017 version of LG's 4K OLED TV?)

Any thoughts from any other readers as to whether I should continue holding out?? Lastly, has anyone heard whether Nakamichi will be adding Atmos in future products? Many thanks!
That was actually a typo error on my part. I actually meant to say “Since it does not have Dolby Atmos, I was curious to see how well the system could handle Atmos movies”. Sorry for the confusion.

And yes, I do think the Nakamichi out-performs all the other soundbars that support Atmos because of the Neural:X up-mixing to 9.2 channels. There is already no comparison from a hardware point of view because you are getting 9.2 channels of true surround sound, which is impossible to achieve with simulated surround seen in most Atmos soundbars like the Sony HT-ST5000 and the $6000 Creative Sonic Carrier. The only true-surround Dolby Atmos soundbar, the Samsung HW-K950, also does not come close. Marshall compared it with the Nakamichi during CES with various content including Dolby Atmos content, and he picked the Nakamichi as the winner. You can find his video here:

Of course part of me wished the Nakamichi was enabled for both Atmos and dts:X. However, my guess would be that the price would go up significantly because Dolby requires soundbars to have physical upfiring speakers before they certify them to qualify to license Dolby Atmos. Not to mention, the Dolby Atmos licensing fees are really high so the end result is a more expensive system. Furthermore, and correct me if I’m wrong, the upfiring speakers are only used when Atmos content is played, which means that if any other content is played (e.g. Dolby Digital),the upfiring speakers play nothing. Quite a waste of hardware space in my opinion. And this is just an observation of mine, but have you seen how tiny the upfiring speakers on soundbars are? I don't even know if the sound coming out from them are of good quality or not!
 
J

Justmy002

Enthusiast
Ratings
4
#6
In looking at their literature, it is a little confusing, but it seems to me they’re still using some of the old bounce the sound off the walls tricks, and you mentioned a funky room so I don’t know that you’ll get good results. I also don’t believe for one second that this will give you the immersive experience you want. I have no doubt that as far as soundbars go, it’s a great one, and it seems to be well thought out with configurable surrounds and dual subs, and probably is convincing in a traditional surround sound way. But IMO if you really want a true immersive playback system, you have to actually build an immersive playback system.
I agree with you. However, building an immersive system requires lots of effort and investment, which many home theater enthusiasts or perhaps audiophiles on a budget do not have. I think Nakamichi has done a great job in creating a solution that specifically suits this growing niche of soundbar consumers as more and more people today watch their movies at home instead of the cinema.
 
mightymic

mightymic

Audiophyte
#7
In looking at their literature, it is a little confusing, but it seems to me they’re still using some of the old bounce the sound off the walls tricks, and you mentioned a funky room so I don’t know that you’ll get good results. I also don’t believe for one second that this will give you the immersive experience you want.
I own an nakamichi 9.2 soundbar at home and the surround effect is way exceed my expectation. It doesn't rely on reflection because it has discrete surround speakers unlike others who uses up firing and side firing drivers in the soundbar. My room is not exactly like a shoebox shape but the surround effect is more controlled compared with the previous simulated surround soundbar I have.


I have no doubt that as far as soundbars go, it’s a great one, and it seems to be well thought out with configurable surrounds and dual subs, and probably is convincing in a traditional surround sound way. But IMO if you really want a true immersive playback system, you have to actually build an immersive playback system.
Agree with you on that but sometime people may just looking for something simple and yet high performance audio. soundbar system won't take up lots of space on your tv console and clearer in terms of cabling. nakamichi 9.2 is probably the closest to a avr system without getting too much of the resistance from my wife. haha...
 
J

Justmy002

Enthusiast
Ratings
4
#8
I own an nakamichi 9.2 soundbar at home and the surround effect is way exceed my expectation. It doesn't rely on reflection because it has discrete surround speakers unlike others who uses up firing and side firing drivers in the soundbar. My room is not exactly like a shoebox shape but the surround effect is more controlled compared with the previous simulated surround soundbar I have.




Agree with you on that but sometime people may just looking for something simple and yet high performance audio. soundbar system won't take up lots of space on your tv console and clearer in terms of cabling. nakamichi 9.2 is probably the closest to a avr system without getting too much of the resistance from my wife. haha...
Cool a fellow Nakamichi owner here who can relate to my sentiments about this beast of a soundbar. Just curious, how big is your room and what are your sound settings?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Samurai
Ratings
1,208 4 1
#9
I agree with you. However, building an immersive system requires lots of effort and investment, which many home theater enthusiasts or perhaps audiophiles on a budget do not have. I think Nakamichi has done a great job in creating a solution that specifically suits this growing niche of soundbar consumers as more and more people today watch their movies at home instead of the cinema.
Absolutely. Building an immersive system is a big investment, in time and money. Not for the faint of heart. The poster I responded to asked about an immersive experience. I have no doubt that this system can deliver a good “traditional” surround experience. But I don’t believe it can deliver a 3d immersive audio experience like real Dolby Atmos, or DtsX, despite the logo on the box. And fwiw, from what I could find, the biggest driver in the speakers is 3 inches. Dynamic? I doubt it. I can see this in a bedroom or den.
I do agree though, they have addressed a lot of typical soundbar shortcomings.

I own an nakamichi 9.2 soundbar at home and the surround effect is way exceed my expectation. It doesn't rely on reflection because it has discrete surround speakers unlike others who uses up firing and side firing drivers in the soundbar. My room is not exactly like a shoebox shape but the surround effect is more controlled compared with the previous simulated surround soundbar I have.
I do know the surrounds are discrete. But according to their literature, their are speakers that fire out of the ends into the walls.
I realize the whole system doesn’t rely on bouncy effects, but I would still think you’d need proper dimensions and placement for Best effect.




Agree with you on that but sometime people may just looking for something simple and yet high performance audio. soundbar system won't take up lots of space on your tv console and clearer in terms of cabling. nakamichi 9.2 is probably the closest to a avr system without getting too much of the resistance from my wife. haha...
Can’t disagree here much.
I’m glad you guys like them, and I’m sure they’re very satisfying. I just wanted to give @taylor3397 a pragmatic response.
 

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