driving me crazy 4k or 1080p

M

mlstark21

Audiophyte
we read so much about viewing distance from your screen to listening position. the problem for me is should I go with the best 1080p projector or a non 4k native pixel shifting epson. I don't mind spending $ but my listening position would only be between 11-12' from my screen. it will be in a completely dark,dedicated room.guess I'm asking if I would notice enough of a difference (dramatic) if I spend $3000 on the Epson. I don't watch TV or sports, just movies and gaming . if the epson isn't dramatic,could you please recommend a top notch 1080p projector? I'm more interested in deep blacks and contrast than a superior color gammet. thanks so much

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
 
M

mlstark21

Audiophyte
we read so much about viewing distance from your screen to listening position. the problem for me is should I go with the best 1080p projector or a non 4k native pixel shifting epson. I don't mind spending $ but my listening position would only be between 11-12' from my screen. it will be in a completely dark,dedicated room.guess I'm asking if I would notice enough of a difference (dramatic) if I spend $3000 on the Epson. I don't watch TV or sports, just movies and gaming . if the epson isn't dramatic,could you please recommend a top notch 1080p projector? I'm more interested in deep blacks and contrast than a superior color gammet. thanks so much

Sent from Yahoo Mail on Android
not sure on screen size(100-120)gonna hang a sheet to c what size I like best
woven and 1 to 1.1 gain in Matte white
 
marticus

marticus

Audioholic
I don't have a 4k projector so haven't had the opportunity to do a back to back comparison so bear that in mind.

What i will say is that i'm sitting about 16ft from a 120" screen @1080p, and the picture is perfectly sharp, I can see the pixels if i'm 6ft from the screen but noones watching a screen that size from that distance lol.

I guess what i'm getting at, is that even if there is a visible difference in sharpness (which i'm sure there is) when i do upgrade, it won't be because of the extra pixels.

There are so many other things that go into making a good projector, with color / contrast / brightess being the biggest, not to mention lens quality.

all that being said, the epson (assuming you mean 5050/6050ub) is generally recommended because it does everything fairly well, not just that it is 4k. aside from the JVC and Sony units there doesn't seem to be much out there better for that price range.
 
M

mlstark21

Audiophyte
I don't have a 4k projector so haven't had the opportunity to do a back to back comparison so bear that in mind.

What i will say is that i'm sitting about 16ft from a 120" screen @1080p, and the picture is perfectly sharp, I can see the pixels if i'm 6ft from the screen but noones watching a screen that size from that distance lol.

I guess what i'm getting at, is that even if there is a visible difference in sharpness (which i'm sure there is) when i do upgrade, it won't be because of the extra pixels.

There are so many other things that go into making a good projector, with color / contrast / brightess being the biggest, not to mention lens quality.

all that being said, the epson (assuming you mean 5050/6050ub) is generally recommended because it does everything fairly well, not just that it is 4k. aside from the JVC and Sony units there doesn't seem to be much out there better for that price range.
thanks...
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
thanks...
Of course there is a difference in the image definition between 1080p and 4K. While sitting at a distance of 9 feet from a 4K TV, the 4K picture is slightly sharper but the 1080p format is still pretty acceptable to my liking. As a matter of fact, I will be receiving a 4K set in the near future through a real estate gift. But personally, I haven't been anxious to get a 4K TV set and to purchase 4K Blu-ray discs since I have found the HD format rather satisfactory.

I suggest that you go to stores that provide a room where you can compare both formats, preferably with the same movie in both formats. That should help you decide as to whether it is worth spending extra bucks for the 4K format.
 
M

mlstark21

Audiophyte
Of course there is a difference in the image definition between 1080p and 4K. While sitting at a distance of 9 feet from a 4K TV, the 4K picture is slightly sharper but the 1080p format is still pretty acceptable to my liking. As a matter of fact, I will be receiving a 4K set in the near future through a real estate gift. But personally, I haven't been anxious to get a 4K TV set and to purchase 4K Blu-ray discs since I have found the HD format rather satisfactory.

I suggest that you go to stores that provide a room where you can compare both formats, preferably with the same movie in both formats. That should help you decide as to whether it is worth spending extra bucks for the 4K format.
awesome idea thanks. it even would be worth the drive for me
 
}Fear_Inoculum{

}Fear_Inoculum{

Senior Audioholic
I just upgraded from an Epson Powerlite 8350 1080p Projector to the Epson 5050UBe 4K Projector in July. There is a big difference in the brightness, sharpness and overall picture quality.

That being said, the Powerlite 8350 1080p was a great projector for the time I had it. And (shameless plug :p ) mine is for sale.........
 
BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
Be aware that there is no quality 1080p out there.

Maybe I'm saying that wrong. But, not really. All modern projectors, above about $1,000 or so, have some version of 4K baked into them. So, if you get an Epson that is better than the 2000 series, it will have 4K acceptance, and will be doing a 1080p eShift tech to deliver half 4K resolution. If you get any of the DLP models with 4K, then you will have a 2x or 4x shift to put 8 million pixels on screen.

At normal viewing distances, both are very sharp and detailed. They are both a step up from 1080p native resolution, which is nice, but the big jump comes from their ability to accept expanded color palettes and put them up on screen. HDR is kind of lost on these models, but certainly not the wider color gamut.

In a dedicated room, with dark walls, ceiling, and carpet, the Epson 5050 is pretty much the undisputed king under $3,000 out there. From that point, you have to go up to a JVC model for native 4K and a actual boost in contrast. I'm a huge JVC fan, but the Epson is a lot less money and does a great job overall with balancing everything.
 
M

mlstark21

Audiophyte
Be aware that there is no quality 1080p out there.

Maybe I'm saying that wrong. But, not really. All modern projectors, above about $1,000 or so, have some version of 4K baked into them. So, if you get an Epson that is better than the 2000 series, it will have 4K acceptance, and will be doing a 1080p eShift tech to deliver half 4K resolution. If you get any of the DLP models with 4K, then you will have a 2x or 4x shift to put 8 million pixels on screen.

At normal viewing distances, both are very sharp and detailed. They are both a step up from 1080p native resolution, which is nice, but the big jump comes from their ability to accept expanded color palettes and put them up on screen. HDR is kind of lost on these models, but certainly not the wider color gamut.

In a dedicated room, with dark walls, ceiling, and carpet, the Epson 5050 is pretty much the undisputed king under $3,000 out there. From that point, you have to go up to a JVC model for native 4K and a actual boost in contrast. I'm a huge JVC fan, but the Epson is a lot less money and does a great job overall with balancing everything.
thanks
 
B

billqs

Audiophyte
You'd be hard-pressed to find a high quality 1080p only projector these days. Almost all the better lineups above entry level will be some kind of 4k even if it's due to pixel shifting.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
You'd be hard-pressed to find a high quality 1080p only projector these days. Almost all the better lineups above entry level will be some kind of 4k even if it's due to pixel shifting.
True. It seems like every PJ or TV is 4K these days. I wonder if we can look back one day and say the same about 8K? :D
 
B

billqs

Audiophyte
Just like 3D for home use, 8K will fade away within a very short period of time.
I just don't see a use case for 8k. Movie special effects are still often shot in 2k and I just don't see 8k creating much of a noticeable difference from seating.

Plus, I think there are still some technological areas of picture display that haven't completely caught up with 4k. JVC took a contrast hit with native 4k at first, though my RS2000 (NS7) is supposedly not as contrast rich as my previous RS500. I don't really notice any difference, however.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
That would be funny. :D

A lot of people have spent a lot of money for 8K TV, PJ, AVR.
IMO, they just wasted their money. I doubt that there will be any recorded commercial 8K discs for home entertainment. There will never be enough demand to justify film makers and disc manufacturers, to think about making some profit from sales of such stuff. Time will eventually tell us who was right.

8K in a home environment is just overkill.
 
Last edited:
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
IMO, they just wasted their money. I doubt that there will be any recorded commercial 8K discs for home entertainment. There will never be enough demand to justify film makers and disc manufacturers to think about making some profit from sales of such stuff. Time will eventually tell us who was right.

8K in a home environment is just overkill.
I know it’s never the same thing, but the 4K video reminds me of Dolby ATMOS - I just can’t see any more surround sound format beyond ATMOS.

I can’t see any benefits beyond 4K when most people can hardly see the benefits of even 4K on their 65-85” TV.
 
B

billqs

Audiophyte
I know it’s never the same thing, but the 4K video reminds me of Dolby ATMOS - I just can’t see any more surround sound format beyond ATMOS.

I can’t see any benefits beyond 4K when most people can hardly see the benefits of even 4K on their 65-85” TV.
I agree with you. I believe the most used feature of HDMI 2.1 will be for gamers making use of 4k 120hz refresh rate. 8k will be all but invisible in the flat panel department and the gains will be minimal in the uber large flat panel and home projector market.

Now, I can see where 8k could make a difference in the commercial cinema market. I don't see 8k happening there for awhile as most exhibitors are just struggling to turn the corner after the pandemic. 8k could help make a difference there and turn the tide of mediocre to bad exhibition quality. I love going to the movies. I used to work for one of the old regional powerhouses, but every time I go now, I'm impressed with the size in a commercial auditorium, but I keep thinking to myself how much better the film will look when I get the UHD Blu-ray and play in own Home Theater.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
I agree with you. I believe the most used feature of HDMI 2.1 will be for gamers making use of 4k 120hz refresh rate. 8k will be all but invisible in the flat panel department and the gains will be minimal in the uber large flat panel and home projector market.

Now, I can see where 8k could make a difference in the commercial cinema market. I don't see 8k happening there for awhile as most exhibitors are just struggling to turn the corner after the pandemic. 8k could help make a difference there and turn the tide of mediocre to bad exhibition quality. I love going to the movies. I used to work for one of the old regional powerhouses, but every time I go now, I'm impressed with the size in a commercial auditorium, but I keep thinking to myself how much better the film will look when I get the UHD Blu-ray and play in own Home Theater.
We’re probably correct on the assessment of the 8K evolutional process - it may possibly die without any 8K contents and without enough people buying 8K TV/PJ.

But I still hope more people buy 8K TVs and PJ and this will lower the prices on 8K TV/PJ like what happened with 4K.

When the prices are low enough and every TV/PJ is 8K, then it’s no longer about whether we can see the benefits. :D

But I think COVID has severely slowed down this possible 8K-evolutional process, and I am wondering if it may die because of this slowdown or will it pick back up.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
As for commercial theaters - most of the commercial Atmos theaters I’ve been to have 2 weaknesses: the ATMOS sound quality and the Picture brightness are both subpar- my home theater both Sounds better and Looks better in PQ.
 
B

billqs

Audiophyte
I'm not in a major enough city to have any fully implemented Dolby Cinema. It's a bit of a shame to find out even if we get a Dolby Cinema eventually it may still be subpar.
 

Latest posts

newsletter

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top