Dali opticon 6 speakers not sure what to do..

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Hotwater84

Enthusiast
Hello all, newb here. Have always had an expensive taste with audio gear and the sound quality it gives and finally after years and years I have the money to get some nice speakers. I was able to demo some Dali opticon 6 towers a few weeks ago and they blew my mind!
I would like this to be my main speakers for my living room I’m very newb when it comes to all the new technologies going on in the av world, And frankly hi end audio in general.

My question is, is it abnormal to listen to a 2.1 or 2.2 system and if I want to have this be a do all music and theater style setup should I get a a/v receiver or do separates?

most of the music will be streamed through tidal as it’s cd quality from what I understand and mainly streaming movies (hulu, plex,) with occasional blu rays as well. I personally care allot more about the music myself but my wife and kids watch more tv and movies.

Any recommendations for how I should go about a receiver or separates would be appreciated. I’m looking to spend $1000-$1500 for the receiver or integrated amp.
Also wondering if a center channel is recommended for the voices in movies or how that would effect the music listening having a center channel. If you got this far thank you and any help would be appreciated greatly.
 
mazersteven

mazersteven

Audioholic Warlord
Dali opticon 6

My question is, is it abnormal to listen to a 2.1 or 2.2 system and if I want to have this be a do all music and theater style setup should I get a a/v receiver or do separates?.

Any recommendations for how I should go about a receiver or separates would be appreciated. I’m looking to spend $1000-$1500 for the receiver or integrated amp.
Also wondering if a center channel is recommended for the voices in movies or how that would effect the music listening having a center channel.
Many people run music systems called - 2 Channel. Some run w/ Subs some run without.

I would start with a good capable AVR receiver from Demon, Marantz, or Yamaha. These are 4ohm speakers but have good Sensitivity. You could always ADD an external amplifier if your receiver is stressed, or gets hot, or you feel your not getting the most from your speakers and want more power.

You can run Phantom Center where the Left/Right share the information a Center Channel would normally. Or you could add a Center Channel right away or again if you feel you need
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
I would be looking at a Denon, Marantz, or Yamaha Reciever. AVR at that price range will have plenty of clean power for a two-channel system. Listening to movies and TV is just fine in 2.1. A good two-channel setup will sound much better than a middling surround sound system, so I wouldn't worry about going surround sound. Everything will still sound great.

A center channel is good if you want the sound anchored to the center of the system, for example when someone is talking in the movie, and you want the voice to appear to come from that location. In a two-channel system, if you are not listening at the 'sweet spot,' a point equidistant from both speakers, then the soundstage will be weighted heavily toward the speaker that you are close to. So if someone is talking is a move, and you are not right between the speakers, the dialogue will sound like it's coming from the speaker closest to you.
 
mazersteven

mazersteven

Audioholic Warlord
This is my electronics recommendations

If your thinking of up-grading in the near future to full surround sound

Denon X3600H 9.2-Ch

Outlaw Audio 2220
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
While separates might offer some advantages, wouldn't call sound quality particularly one of them (altho would depend on the specific gear being compared). I have old 2ch separates from my old music only days but since I've added video I've got no issues with using avrs for both, they're much more versatile and using speakers appropriate to their amp sections, no disadvantages IME. 2ch gear often lacks good bass management for subs, too...avrs it's a normal feature.
 
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shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Any mid-range AVR is going to give him better than 100 watts per channel at two channels. That is surely enough for most people. The advantage of separates are that it make for better long-term reliability when the heat-emitting amplifier is kept away from pre-amp components, and outboard amps typically handle lower impedance loads better.
 
H

Hotwater84

Enthusiast
I appreciate all the responses so far, most modern av receivers that you mentioned have the ability to stream Bluetooth audio from a phone, tablet, or laptop correct? Will I still get great sound if I’m streaming from a service that has hi res audio like tidal? Sorry if this is super basic.

Also I’ve been watching some Audioholics videos on YouTube and remember Gene saying something about 2 musts for a receiver a pre amp out So you can add a power amp and 2 sub outputs on a receiver and making sure they are a certain kind man my brain is farting out on me at the moment.
 
mazersteven

mazersteven

Audioholic Warlord
The Receiver I linked

Inputs & Outputs
Phono Input1
Audio-Video Inputs8
Audio-only Inputs2
Component Video Inputs2
Component Video Monitor Outputs1
Optical Digital Inputs2
Coaxial Digital Inputs2
Optical Digital OutputsNone
Coaxial Digital OutputsNone
HDMI Inputs8
HDMI Monitor Outputs3
Subwoofer Outputs2
Discrete Subwoofer OutputsYes
Multi-Channel Analog InputNo
Multi-channel Preamp OutputYes
Main Speaker Output Pairs1
Main Speaker TerminalsPosts
Ethernet Port1
USB Connections1 Front
Removable Power CordIEC 2-prong
 
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H

Hotwater84

Enthusiast
Here are the speakers specs it says 25-200 watts so with these receiver brands mentioned what’s the sweet spot for watts? Or what should I be looking for 80-150 watts? I’m into post hardcore, indie rock, prog metal stuff so I tend to listen a little louder than probably the average person.
 

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H

Hotwater84

Enthusiast
Thanks bro! Seems like this thing offers so much for the price, allot of it seeming to go to waste if just running a left and right and sub or 2, but also future proofing myself a little bit if I expand the system down the road.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
I appreciate all the responses so far, most modern av receivers that you mentioned have the ability to stream Bluetooth audio from a phone, tablet, or laptop correct? Will I still get great sound if I’m streaming from a service that has hi res audio like tidal? Sorry if this is super basic.

Also I’ve been watching some Audioholics videos on YouTube and remember Gene saying something about 2 musts for a receiver a pre amp out So you can add a power amp and 2 sub outputs on a receiver and making sure they are a certain kind man my brain is farting out on me at the moment.
Most do bluetooth, and even better, can handle wifi/ethernet connections for even better fidelity and range around the house. BT has been getting better but isn't quite up to what you can do via networking.

I like avrs to have a full set of pre-outs. For those that have only one sub pre-out you can easily use a splitter, but some avrs have the ability to separately set level/delay for two subs, which can be useful (like Audyssey XT32 equipped units from Denon/Marantz for example). Having one of the avrs that can handle 4 ohm loads can be nice. Some look for particular room eq programs (like Audyssey XT32).
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
Here are the speakers specs it says 25-200 watts so with these receiver brands mentioned what’s the sweet spot for watts? Or what should I be looking for 80-150 watts? I’m into post hardcore, indie rock, prog metal stuff so I tend to listen a little louder than probably the average person.
Looking for watts is not a good spec to make speaker choice from, it's not well defined and one of the least useful really, often just represents a maximum input power, not even one at which the speaker is sounding good particularly but perhaps to avoid damage....try this article on more important specs https://www.audioholics.com/loudspeaker-design/loudspeaker-sensitivity
 
mazersteven

mazersteven

Audioholic Warlord
It's a new feature on some AVR's that the internal amp section is disconnected when you connect an external amp this feature is new.
 
H

Hotwater84

Enthusiast
It's a new feature on some AVR's that the internal amp section is disconnected when you connect an external amp this feature is new.
Sorry for my ignorance but if I get that denon receiver I WILL or WONT be able to run the speakers to an outboard power amp if my L and R need more juice or will it create more “noise” like what gene was saying in the review of that receiver.
 
mazersteven

mazersteven

Audioholic Warlord
You could run those speakers just on that receiver or you can run them on external amplification either way. My recommendation is to run them on the receiver and if you feel like they're missing something, or the receiver is running too hot, you're pushing the receive too hard, then you can always buy an amp later. It's up to you.

I linked the Amps I recommend if you go that way
 
L

Leemix

Audioholic Chief
Sorry for my ignorance but if I get that denon receiver I WILL or WONT be able to run the speakers to an outboard power amp if my L and R need more juice or will it create more “noise” like what gene was saying in the review of that receiver.
You can probably just set it to 11ch mode no matter how many speakers connected. But the “noise” seem more theoretical than actual in real use. Lots of people have those older versions ,without the ability to turn off the amp sections, using external amps and are perfectly happy with it.


Sent from my iPad using Tapatalk
 
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Hotwater84

Enthusiast
Thanks all that have responded to this thread never seen such helpful folks in an online community before!
 

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