slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
So, when you do a black baffle and painted or veneered box, do you paint the baffle and then mount it, or do you assemble the box and mask off the baffle? I would think that it's hard to get a seamless transition unless you wet sand flat and then lacquer over top?
In this case, I painted the baffle, glued it on (XO already installed), then did the blue finish. I used very good quality Frog brand masking tape and was very happy with the transition from one to the other. In fact, the very reason I went with a different color on the baffle is that I found that the Duratex material does not hide seams as well as I thought it would (found that out on my MK BOOM build that I had mentioned). Thus, I decided to avoid that problem (i.e. more sanding) completely by making the seams a completely different finish material and texture (it is tough to see the relief texture of the blue duratex in the pic).

BUT.....be aware that by painting first, I had to come back and re-sand and refinish the spots where my clamps were for the baffle gluing. In the future, I would likely go ahead and install the XOs, glue it all up, mask it off, then work on the finish as a whole. That's the "nice" thing about DIY, you always learn from your previous work and know better for your next project.

I have also learned that I really don't like working with MDF!
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Here is my PE MK Boom build. You can see what I'm talking about on the seams and also see the texture better in this pic. I am very pleased with how this turned out! Seams is nitpicking, but if I had realized, I would have sanded those better before applying the duratex.
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Chief
Here is my PE MK Boom build. You can see what I'm talking about on the seams and also see the texture better in this pic. I am very pleased with how this turned out! Seams is nitpicking, but if I had realized, I would have sanded those better before applying the duratex.
You don't really notice it very much in the finished version. Nice job!
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
Here is my PE MK Boom build. You can see what I'm talking about on the seams and also see the texture better in this pic. I am very pleased with how this turned out! Seams is nitpicking, but if I had realized, I would have sanded those better before applying the duratex.
I am really not that much of a stickler with finishes. I am more of a "form follows function" type. I could not make a living wood working from where I am at, initially. I just have the time, and perseverance, to keep sneaking up on that cut line until it fits, just so. I do have many years of machinery and power/hand tool experience. But, I was doing this stuff when I was 8, before I had anything beyond a dull saw and a hammer. That's been the biggest difference, really. Quality tools.

Here's a really neat trick for seams. I use fine line (Although the frog tape would suffice.) tape, on both the cabinet and the baffle, creating a 3/8" wide stripe. Then I mix 5 min (have to work fast) epoxy with cabosil (baking flower would work as well) into peanut butter consistency and fill the stripe, and then carefully remove the tape immediately. Makes a factory type looking transition, or a subtle ogee effect. Especially handy if the veneer has made the cabinet (pre-cut, flat pack?) larger than the supplied baffle.



After paint.


This would have to be done ahead of the textured surface, though, or else when you tried to wipe the filler tight with the putty knife, the texture would telegraph ripples into the stripe. Otherwise, would have to sand the edge smooth first, where the knife was going to travel on it.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
@MrBoat here you go! The baffle is primered with killz, sanded at 220, rattle can flat black. Every other part of the cab is Duratex (bought it white and tinted to sky blue, leftover from a build of the PE MK Boom portable BT speaker build). I like to make a kind of "faux leather" texture with the duratex.

These are currently my garage speakers, where they are in use daily.

Pretty easy to see that my skill, experience, and patience for the finishing work is not at your level. But, I do think I get pretty good results within my skill set and for likely much less time investment than you. And, of course I get a little better at it with each build, learn from previous mistakes and difficulties.

But, my electronics skill and experience is top notch.
Those turned out quite nicely. What are you powering them with?
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Chief
I am really not that much of a stickler with finishes. I am more of a "form follows function" type. I could not make a living wood working from where I am at, initially. I just have the time, and perseverance, to keep sneaking up on that cut line until it fits, just so. I do have many years of machinery and power/hand tool experience. But, I was doing this stuff when I was 8, before I had anything beyond a dull saw and a hammer. That's been the biggest difference, really. Quality tools.

Here's a really neat trick for seams. I use fine line (Although the frog tape would suffice.) tape, on both the cabinet and the baffle, creating a 3/8" wide stripe. Then I mix 5 min (have to work fast) epoxy with cabosil (baking flower would work as well) into peanut butter consistency and fill the stripe, and then carefully remove the tape immediately. Makes a factory type looking transition, or a subtle ogee effect. Especially handy if the veneer has made the cabinet (pre-cut, flat pack?) larger than the supplied baffle.



After paint.


This would have to be done ahead of the textured surface, though, or else when you tried to wipe the filler tight with the putty knife, the texture would telegraph ripples into the stripe. Otherwise, would have to sand the edge smooth first, where the knife was going to travel on it.
That is a neat trick. How do you level the bead of epoxy? Can you run a plane over it or sanding?
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
That is a neat trick. How do you level the bead of epoxy? Can you run a plane over it or sanding?
The epoxy is self leveling. You make a loose putty with it and apply it with a putty knife and wipe it tight to the two lines of tape. It will have a height the thickness of the tapes, at both the cabinet edge, and on the baffle. Then I just scuff it with scotch pad before paint.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Audioholic Slumlord
Did manage to get the main carcasses glued together. Figured to do it tomorrow but it only took like 15-20 mins to do them both.
That is exactly the right way to build a speaker cabinet. No butt joints!

That cabinet is far better than the run of the mill Chinese built cabinets offered by a multitude of on line dealers.

I'm still surprised at how few members craft their own speakers. If you want good speakers at reasonable cost, then build them!
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Chief
That is exactly the right way to build a speaker cabinet. No butt joints!

That cabinet is far better than the run of the mill Chinese built cabinets offered by a multitude of on line dealers.

I'm still surprised at how few members craft their own speakers. If you want good speakers at reasonable cost, then build them!
I imagine the 2 biggest obstacles are crossovers and finishing. Not everyone has soldering equipment or experience, although regular irons are not expensive and Meniscus sells crossovers in kits or assembled. Most people have a skill saw even if they don't own a table saw. You can do fine with a skill saw and a good straight edge. I did much of my bookcases with the skill saw as the shop is too small to run 8' sheets through the table. Bought a good Freud blade for plywood and had no issues at all with wood splintering (that's key).

I really like the heat activated wood glue for wood veneers they sell now. Great idea. Contact cement can be a challenge and while animal glue leaves some work time and bonds well as it shrinks while it cools, it still requires a hot plate. Getting that nice gloss finish takes a lot of research and practice though. I hope to start a pair this year but having a tough time deciding on which model to do first.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
I imagine the 2 biggest obstacles are crossovers and finishing. Not everyone has soldering equipment or experience, although regular irons are not expensive and Meniscus sells crossovers in kits or assembled. Most people have a skill saw even if they don't own a table saw. You can do fine with a skill saw and a good straight edge. I did much of my bookcases with the skill saw as the shop is too small to run 8' sheets through the table. Bought a good Freud blade for plywood and had no issues at all with wood splintering (that's key).

I really like the heat activated wood glue for wood veneers they sell now. Great idea. Contact cement can be a challenge and while animal glue leaves some work time and bonds well as it shrinks while it cools, it still requires a hot plate. Getting that nice gloss finish takes a lot of research and practice though. I hope to start a pair this year but having a tough time deciding on which model to do first.
I have a table saw and access to a Unisaw at work but I like working at home and leaving the dust outdoors. I like using a straightedge and I don't feel like hefting 3/4" MDF to break it down on the table saw, at least without a substantial in-feed and out-feed setup. I don't like having other people hold the wild end of the board, either. Anymore, even if I do use the tablesaw, I still break it down with the circular saw first. I have a 1" x 2" screen porch extrusion I use for a straightedge.

The one in front is an old W.T. Grant store branded saw that I use the most around here and I built a boat with it. It runs better with a straightedge than the Makita does. The Makita has built a bunch of homes and I have two of those. I got a pretty nice solder station off amazon for around $40.

 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Those turned out quite nicely. What are you powering them with?
I think you need to change your name to "MrEpoxy" ;)

I'm currently running my Classix from a ChipAmp

I also recently added a simple media streamer that I built up from an RPi Zero and various parts that I already had on-hand.
 
M

MrBoat

Audioholic Samurai
I think you need to change your name to "MrEpoxy" ;)

I'm currently running my Classix from a ChipAmp

I also recently added a simple media streamer that I built up from an RPi Zero and various parts that I already had on-hand.
Epoxy was one of the best inventions of the 20th century. :)
 

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