Bose: Legit Audio Company or Slick Marketing?

How do you View Bose?

  • Real Audio Company

    Votes: 13 34.2%
  • Marketing Company

    Votes: 21 55.3%
  • Crapola

    Votes: 4 10.5%

  • Total voters
    38
Auditor55

Auditor55

Audioholic Chief
Tell me a company that doesn't use slick marketing. Especially in the A/V world, there's a term used across A/V forums like this, it called "Upgraditis", which primarily a result of slick marketing.
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Spartan
Tell me a company that doesn't use slick marketing. Especially in the A/V world, there's a term used across A/V forums like this, it called "Upgraditis", which primarily a result of slick marketing.
Except for when you get what you pay for!!!
Obviously every market uses slick, or smart marketing, and many times there’s not much to gain. But for me, in the case of BLOSE, there’s nothing to gain in the first place. The return on investment is very low, and to the uninitiated, it’s almost a crime against them. IE: snake oil...

Informed shoppers will many times find that upgraditis can be fulfilled with a valuable return in investment, and a worthy upgrade. Upgrading isn’t always a screw job as I think you’re implying. BLOSE certainly isn’t the only company who’s guilty of overselling their wares, but they’re one of the most widely known, and imo that means they should be the most responsible.
 
F

FreeTzin

Audiophyte
I am an Engineer, but a Mechanical one, and this is what I believe makes Bose speakers popular:
In a perfect world, accurate (High Fidelity) sound reproduction would mean, as some have stated, making the sound system "disappear" leaving only the illusion of a live performance with live, actual, physical instruments and performers. That concept works for acoustic instruments but the sound of electronic ones will always be colored by the electronics and speakers that make them work, so electronic instruments have no actual "real" sound, unless you consider "real" a "perfect" acoustical rendition of whatever signal is fed the Amplifier. So, accurate sound reproduction means accurately capturing said sound, storing it and reproducing it, usually by means of paper cones with precious little resemblance to wood resonance chambers, vibrating strings, metal tubes or discs, and flat, tense leather membranes (maybe what speakers resemble the most are drums). The issue here is that a "good" "High Fidelity" system will (at least in theory) accurately reproduce whatever it is fed, so it must be fed an extremely high-quality signal in order for it to produce high-quality sound. The worse the input signal is, the more its undesirable effects will be exacerbated by a high-quality system. As a result, a poor input signal tends to sound worse the better the system it is fed into is.
On the other hand, as far as I understand, what Bose does is process the input signal to get rid of any perceivable negative artifacts (by means of psychoacoustics) and "adapt" it to whatever their hardware is capable of doing "best" and the listener's ears and brain feel "comfortable" with. In other words, Bose will not ask of neither the input signal, nor the speaker, nor the listener, something they are not capable of doing reasonably well. That may definitely not be "High Fidelity", but the effect is that, in my experience, Bose speakers always sound just "as well" regardless of the input signal they are being fed, and they are not tiring to listen to. One can listen to them all day long using any practically any source material imaginable, and never grow tired or end up with a headache or ringing ears, something that cannot always be said of high-end equipment. Plus, they're much more practical to carry around than huge speakers with 15-inch drivers and welding-plant amplifiers. They may be inaccurate, but simply more practical in most real-world scenarios. And it's all about perception.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Samurai
I am an Engineer, but a Mechanical one, and this is what I believe makes Bose speakers popular:
In a perfect world, accurate (High Fidelity) sound reproduction would mean, as some have stated, making the sound system "disappear" leaving only the illusion of a live performance with live, actual, physical instruments and performers. That concept works for acoustic instruments but the sound of electronic ones will always be colored by the electronics and speakers that make them work, so electronic instruments have no actual "real" sound, unless you consider "real" a "perfect" acoustical rendition of whatever signal is fed the Amplifier. So, accurate sound reproduction means accurately capturing said sound, storing it and reproducing it, usually by means of paper cones with precious little resemblance to wood resonance chambers, vibrating strings, metal tubes or discs, and flat, tense leather membranes (maybe what speakers resemble the most are drums). The issue here is that a "good" "High Fidelity" system will (at least in theory) accurately reproduce whatever it is fed, so it must be fed an extremely high-quality signal in order for it to produce high-quality sound. The worse the input signal is, the more its undesirable effects will be exacerbated by a high-quality system. As a result, a poor input signal tends to sound worse the better the system it is fed into is.
On the other hand, as far as I understand, what Bose does is process the input signal to get rid of any perceivable negative artifacts (by means of psychoacoustics) and "adapt" it to whatever their hardware is capable of doing "best" and the listener's ears and brain feel "comfortable" with. In other words, Bose will not ask of neither the input signal, nor the speaker, nor the listener, something they are not capable of doing reasonably well. That may definitely not be "High Fidelity", but the effect is that, in my experience, Bose speakers always sound just "as well" regardless of the input signal they are being fed, and they are not tiring to listen to. One can listen to them all day long using any practically any source material imaginable, and never grow tired or end up with a headache or ringing ears, something that cannot always be said of high-end equipment. Plus, they're much more practical to carry around than huge speakers with 15-inch drivers and welding-plant amplifiers. They may be inaccurate, but simply more practical in most real-world scenarios. And it's all about perception.
But a real audiophile cannot listen to a Bose speaker all day long because of its inaccuracy. IMO, people who buy such product don't know much about music, they never or have not recently assisted to a live performance with acoustic instruments, or believe everything sellers are telling them.
 
F

FreeTzin

Audiophyte
I have a pretty decent system comprised of B&W 801s powered by a Carver M1.5t playing 15-ips 2-track reel-to-reel tapes on a restored ReVox PR99 MkII that I seldom fire up because my wife starts complaining, and the dogs start howling, so I am only able to enjoy it when I'm alone in the room and I have the opportunity to just sit and listen, which I enjoy immensely. On the other hand, for everyday listening I use Bose SoundTouch speakers streaming Deezer at a steady (compressed) sound-pressure level, a constrained, midrange-intensive frequency response, and almost-single-note "simulated" bass. But it keeps me entertained, and no one complains. I can't hear beyond 5 kHz anymore anyway, so, so be it, I guess... Plus, paying monthly rent for unlimited streaming is certainly cheaper than purchasing decent studio-quality tapes, and offers much more varied listening material.
I guess I am not an audiophile and the times I remember attending live acoustic performances must be figments of my imagination, then.
 
Kingnoob

Kingnoob

Audioholic Chief
Honestly Bose bookshelf speakers are not about audio quality at all. This is why audiophiles dislike them so much. The primary thing Bose goes for in their bookshelves is to fill a room with background sound so you can listened to spotify while vacuuming the rugs or folding clothes. For that they do their job well as these things are bouncing sound off the walls. But for those of us that give a dam about audio quality the trade off of less direct sound isn't worth it.
Better sound threw marketing ... there technology has actually gone backwards into death

...


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
William Lemmerhirt

William Lemmerhirt

Audioholic Spartan
I am an Engineer, but a Mechanical one, and this is what I believe makes Bose speakers popular:
In a perfect world, accurate (High Fidelity) sound reproduction would mean, as some have stated, making the sound system "disappear" leaving only the illusion of a live performance with live, actual, physical instruments and performers. That concept works for acoustic instruments but the sound of electronic ones will always be colored by the electronics and speakers that make them work, so electronic instruments have no actual "real" sound, unless you consider "real" a "perfect" acoustical rendition of whatever signal is fed the Amplifier. So, accurate sound reproduction means accurately capturing said sound, storing it and reproducing it, usually by means of paper cones with precious little resemblance to wood resonance chambers, vibrating strings, metal tubes or discs, and flat, tense leather membranes (maybe what speakers resemble the most are drums). The issue here is that a "good" "High Fidelity" system will (at least in theory) accurately reproduce whatever it is fed, so it must be fed an extremely high-quality signal in order for it to produce high-quality sound. The worse the input signal is, the more its undesirable effects will be exacerbated by a high-quality system. As a result, a poor input signal tends to sound worse the better the system it is fed into is.
On the other hand, as far as I understand, what Bose does is process the input signal to get rid of any perceivable negative artifacts (by means of psychoacoustics) and "adapt" it to whatever their hardware is capable of doing "best" and the listener's ears and brain feel "comfortable" with. In other words, Bose will not ask of neither the input signal, nor the speaker, nor the listener, something they are not capable of doing reasonably well. That may definitely not be "High Fidelity", but the effect is that, in my experience, Bose speakers always sound just "as well" regardless of the input signal they are being fed, and they are not tiring to listen to. One can listen to them all day long using any practically any source material imaginable, and never grow tired or end up with a headache or ringing ears, something that cannot always be said of high-end equipment. Plus, they're much more practical to carry around than huge speakers with 15-inch drivers and welding-plant amplifiers. They may be inaccurate, but simply more practical in most real-world scenarios. And it's all about perception.
You are right. Perception IS reality. And for many, the perception that Blose is a premium brand makes it so. To them...
Ime with their products, I’ve always felt disappointed. Good example is the Bose soundlink that i have(gift). It sounds atrocious, and cost 300 bucks. Conversely I’ve used JBL BT speakers that were 1/3 or 1/2 of the cost and sound much better. So while my Bose BT speaker won’t give me listening fatigue the way that some obnoxious tweeters can, it fatigues me in a different way, in that I’m never satisfied by listening to it, even though I’ve tempered my expectations. Even my wife who hates having 7.3.4 in the LR and messing with remotes, prefers NOT using the soundlink. I won’t even talk about the acoustimass lifestyle junk, or the wave radio. My iPhone XR sounds as good as that the wave radio. I have a couple friends that each have 501’s and 301’s. While they definitely don’t hurt my ears, there are much better performing speakers for AT LEAST the same price and almost always less. They don’t look any better IMO to boot.

So what I took from your point was that a Blose system will “dumb down” the signal by means of signal processing, and
driver/enclosure “design” so as not to sound poor no matter what you play on it. Maybe there is something to that...if it can’t possibly sound good with any material, it can’t possibly sound bad either. Too bad it costs so much for middling performance.....

I will say, the form factor of the soundlink is pretty nice.
 

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