Pwaynez

Pwaynez

Enthusiast
Alright, so I am 99% sure this is the projector I will be going with. I am new to the PJ world, but I think this seems to be the best bang for my buck currently. It is a bit higher than I wanted to spend, but I have not found much in the $1,000-1,200 range and this seems (from my limited knowledge) to have quite a few bonuses for the extra money. Rec 709 100%, Keystone, Lens shift, HDR10, and glass lens. Other than that I know it is DLP but from my knowledge DLP is all I am going to get in my budget. Also the DCI-P3 in my limited knowledge seems to be another + with this PJ.

I was comparing to the Optoma UHD60 but have heard some not great things about Optoma as far as quality and a company. Hoping BenQ is better.

I am also looking to pair with a SilverTicket or Elite Screens automatic PJ screen.

Would love to hear thoughts/opinions on SilverTicket, Elite Screens and BenQ especially those who own or have seen any of these in person.
 
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BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
So, the BenQ is a well reviewed projector so far and really has been VERY long anticipated as the appropriate replacement to the venerable w1070 they introduced 7 years ago. The shorter throw distance is ideal for almost all entry level setups as it puts the projector right above most seating distances. The tiny bit of lens shift helps with placement a bit. But, the quality is entry level DLP, which is very strong for the price point. Don't expect OLED quality here, it's not going to do that. But, if you don't have an all black room, you may not get the benefit that offers anyway.

I'm not sure what an 'automatic' PJ screen is. You mean, an electric roll up screen? Be aware that all manual or electric non-tab-tensioned screens get waves in the material soon enough and those waves can be visible. The longer the throw of the projector, the more it diminishes those waves, but they will still be visible in the image. This isn't a deal breaker for the HT3550, but it's something to always remember when buying a screen that you know will have image defects either out of the box, or within a year or two.

Both Elite and SilverTicket screens are comparable.
 
Pwaynez

Pwaynez

Enthusiast
So, the BenQ is a well reviewed projector so far and really has been VERY long anticipated as the appropriate replacement to the venerable w1070 they introduced 7 years ago. The shorter throw distance is ideal for almost all entry level setups as it puts the projector right above most seating distances. The tiny bit of lens shift helps with placement a bit. But, the quality is entry level DLP, which is very strong for the price point. Don't expect OLED quality here, it's not going to do that. But, if you don't have an all black room, you may not get the benefit that offers anyway.

I'm not sure what an 'automatic' PJ screen is. You mean, an electric roll up screen? Be aware that all manual or electric non-tab-tensioned screens get waves in the material soon enough and those waves can be visible. The longer the throw of the projector, the more it diminishes those waves, but they will still be visible in the image. This isn't a deal breaker for the HT3550, but it's something to always remember when buying a screen that you know will have image defects either out of the box, or within a year or two.

Both Elite and SilverTicket screens are comparable.
You seem very educated, I just posted this in the beginner section but want your thoughts. "
Alright, so I am quite new here and have had some great feedback from the community. I *thought* I was sold 100% on a 4k PJ but I just cant justify $1500 for the BenQ 3550 when I read all the stellar reviews on other 1080p PJs. Viewing distance will be from 6'-12' (very often the 12' will be utilized, which I have read 1080p vs 4K is hard to even notice a difference at the later distance viewing) only shorter when guests/family are over for sporting events. I have been reading and see great quality for the BenQ 2050a ($680) as far as movie quality goes, but read the tk800 ($1100) is much better for sports - I assume because of HDR and brighter lamp. I have very very little ambient light (which can be controlled almost 100%). I primarily care about movie and sports viewing. Any recommendations as far as a 1080p or 4K, with great quality provided for sports AND movies?"

Basically there is a $900 trade off between the BenQ3550 and BenQ2550a. The reviews I see the 2550 does extremely well with movie quality. However it may lack a bit in sports due to no HDR from what I can find. I have also looked into the 3050 BenQ as it offers 100% rec. (not sure how big a difference 96 to 100% rec. is personally) I watch A LOT of sports and A LOT of movies so a PJ that does both would be ideal. The value of the 2550a just seems great for $680... even if it just does sports 'well enough...'
 
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BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
If you are just getting into things and budget is a bit of a concern, get the HT2550a and be completely happy with it for several years.

Understand that HDR is something of a myth with front projector (there are plenty of articles as to why) and while 4K HDR content does offer some advantages, they are not as night and day as the original jump from SDTV to HDTV was.

Now, 12' and 4K is not a real thing. It is about how far you are viewing the image (12') and how LARGE the image is. People say 4K is only worthwhile when you are viewing a 60" or larger TV. That's just BS. You sit 24" from your computer monitors. Those monitors may be 24" in diagonal or larger. You really think that jumping to a 4K image when sitting 2' away from a 24" (or larger) monitor doesn't make a difference? Of course it does!

It's about viewing distance AND image size. So, from 12', if you are viewing a 150" image diagonal, you will see a jump in quality between 1080p and 4K. But, at 120" diagonal or smaller, you won't see as much of a difference.

Now, the big jump with 4K is not just the resolution, but the jump in color. This is a good thing as any display which accepts a 4K source may be able to use that additional color depth to improve image performance. That's nice.

The key being that you are very unlikely to have ANY sports viewing which will be in true 4K and certainly none which will likely take advantage of the additional colors afforded to 4K content. It's just to much bandwidth to take up anytime soon. So, your sports viewing is likely to be 1080. Maybe not even 1080p. Sports, for years, has been broadcast at 720p resolution. Broadcast technology is YEARS behind display technology.

NOW - Sports viewing!!!

The reason that people talk about the TK800 because it is bright. It doesn't have the contrast of the 2050a, but it certainly will be brighter. It won't have the color saturation... but it will be brighter.

Do you need that brightness?

NO! Not if you make a pointed effort to control the ambient light within the room you are in. That is, you can't have half a dozen recessed ceiling lights on, especially near the screen, while using a projector for ANY viewing, including sports. But, that doesn't mean you can't have light on. It just means those lights need to be away from the projector. Install, or buy floor lamps, which are directional and that direct light downward near the seating area, and use dark seating and dark colors to prevent reflections from landing on the screen. You can have quite a bit of actual lighting on while still enjoying the game with friends.

I use this as an example. It is 10+ years old now, but still applies. The projector in use is a Panasonic PT-L300u (my first digital projector) which may have been putting out 300-500 lumens on a .8 gain 106" diagonal grey screen. But, the lighting was solid in the room it was in. The room had grey walls and ceiling and a dark green main wall.
http://www.avintegrated.com/lighting.html
 

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