Adjusting DB levels and distances after audyssey

SACTOWNS_FINEST

SACTOWNS_FINEST

Enthusiast
Avr denon s950h - klipsch cc r52c - klipsch bookshelf r15m x4 - klipsch atmos spks r41sa x2 - klipsch R-112SW - 12 gauge wire going to all channels - 968 cubic ft room. After running audyssey i adjusted the distances manually with a measuring tape and used a vlike vl6708 slp meter to adjust db levels at 0.0db max volume aiming for 75db reference level to each channel. My question is am I running my avr or channels hot with th results I've come up with, Front Left -5.5db Center -5.0db Front Right -5.0db Surround R -8.5db Surround L 8.5db Top Middle R -1.0db Top Middle L 1.0db Subwoofer -5.0db, all channels set to small at 80hz except atmos channels set to 120hz, Sub set to LFE 120hz, MultiEQ flat - dynamic EQ on - -reference level offset 0db - dynamic volume light. Sounds amazing to my ears I just want to make sure everything is fine where it's at. Thank you guys for your time and be safe.
 

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Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Warlord
I wouldn't mess with the distances Audyssey sets. They don't always match the physical measurements because it has more to do with timing. It's using distance to make up for inconsistencies in timing between all of your speakers. This is especially true with subwoofers.

*Edit: I wouldn't use dynamic volume either unless you have issues with pissing neighbors off or folks sleeping in the next room. Turn that off. I also like to have dynamic eq ON.
 
SACTOWNS_FINEST

SACTOWNS_FINEST

Enthusiast
Actually audyssey was shot on with distances so I didn't really mess with it, also is dynamic volume like a night mode? I only used it because I noticed I didn't have to turn the volume up that loud
 
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Pogre

Pogre

Audioholic Warlord
Got you so should I rerun audyssey because I did not save my distance settings
I would. I don't see any harm in double checking your levels, but distances I leave alone. Everything else you typed (speakers small, xover 80 and 120 hz) in the op looks pretty solid except dynamic volume. That's more for volume control, not enhancement. Dynamic eq is an enhancement. Turn that on and try playing with the different level offsets to see if you have a preference.
 
SACTOWNS_FINEST

SACTOWNS_FINEST

Enthusiast
I'll do that and thank you for the help
I would. I don't see any harm in double checking your levels, but distances I leave alone. Everything else you typed (speakers small, xover 80 and 120 hz) in the op looks pretty solid except dynamic volume. That's more for volume control, not enhancement. Dynamic eq is an enhancement. Turn that on and try playing with the different level offsets to see if you have a preference.
I would. I don't see any harm in double checking your levels, but distances I leave alone. Everything else you typed (speakers small, xover 80 and 120 hz) in the op looks pretty solid except dynamic volume. That's more for volume control, not enhancement. Dynamic eq is an enhancement. Turn that on and try playing with the different level offsets to see if you have a preference.
I was noticing since I turned off the dynamic volume that the center channel is very low would it be a problem to turn it up it's at -5db was thinking maybe 0.0db?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
It's largely about final preference but as was said I find it (Audyssey, altho I've never had the base MultEQ version) generally fine for setting delays (distance). Levels on surrounds sometimes I adjust depending on setup, some like to boost the center for dialog (I don't find any need for that....might also just check your center speaker's positioning as being a contributor). For movies the RLO at 0 is fine, but I move it around for music. I don't like Dynamic Volume myself, yes its a dynamic compression routine/night time type mode.
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
I'll do that and thank you for the help
I would say in general the results should be within a couple dB either way, and it is a good idea to check it manually with a spl meter set to "C" weighting slow. It is hard to say which is more accurate, assuming you are using something like the Radio Shack 33-2055 that has a claimed accuracy of +/- 2 dB at 114 dB and for frequency between 50-10,000 Hz iirc, without mentioning the accuracy for pink noise. In recent years I typically went with Audyssey's.
 
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ParisB

Junior Audioholic
Audyssey calibrates for 75dB, and the internal test tones max out at 75dB, but keep in mind when watching a movie at volume 0 (reference) it will actually be 85dB with 105dB peaks.
 
SACTOWNS_FINEST

SACTOWNS_FINEST

Enthusiast
Does it matter on the Audyssey version I have I don't have the XT32 I have a lower tier Denon receiver S950H also the loudest volume I go to is -20DB it's plenty loud in the size room I'm in 11×11×8
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Seriously, I have no life.
Does it matter on the Audyssey version I have I don't have the XT32 I have a lower tier Denon receiver S950H also the loudest volume I go to is -20DB it's plenty loud in the size room I'm in 11×11×8
Well the XT32 version is more capable....but you could try turning off Audyssey and just use its setup of settings for delay (distance) and levels only and see if you prefer that over using the Audyssey EQ settings....or use different eq setting like reference.....
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Ninja
In general, though, Aud does really well with setting distances. As mentioned above... it's a delay thing, and subwoofers are often set further than the actual measurement due to the DSP built in to them. :)
 

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