Adding high quality audio streaming capabilities to my Denon X4500H and Ceol N11DAB?

witchdoctor

witchdoctor

Audioholic
It's not free if you pay for it.
Uhhh, you have already demonstrated your financial acumen, I gotta put you on the ignore list Trell, good luck with your future audio adventures:rolleyes:
 
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Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
Uhhh, you have already demonstrated your financial acumen, I got put you on the ignore list Trell, good luck with your future audio adventures:rolleyes:
If you only put yourself on the ignore list and the world would be a better place. ;) Fat chance of that happening, though, but hope is eternal.

I'm sure that you can't resists clicking on the "read ignored post" link.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
This is one of the dumbest audio threads I've read for some time.
 
I

Isak Öhrlund

Junior Audioholic
It was pretty obvious that audio was not your area of research. Btw, there are many members here that have a research background, a few even in audio. ;)
Well, even researchers in audio don't know everything about home theater ;) Furthermore, listening tests should be set up by researchers who know study design, human perception and behavior and inferential statistics. There was definitely a lack of that in the linked references above.

As for sound quality: Go for issues that is well recorded, mixed and mastered. Of course, you'll also have to like the music you are listening to, and some of that have more quality than others (performance or otherwise). As for streaming "higher quality" you have to decide for yourself if the streaming quality is good enough for you. With high bitrate you won't notice, and high audio bitrate is negligible to what is required for video.
All streaming services offer the songs I want to listen to. The recordings are obviously the same. The difference comes down to encode and bit rate, and some here claim that that makes no difference because you can't hear the difference. If that is the case, regardless of what gear and what ears you have, there is no reason to bother with Tidal, Apple Music, Amazon or Qobuz when Spotify is the only service that is compatible across platforms, hardware and has the best usability of them all.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Well, even researchers in audio don't know everything about home theater ;) Furthermore, listening tests should be set up by researchers who know study design, human perception and behavior and inferential statistics. There was definitely a lack of that in the linked references above.



All streaming services offer the songs I want to listen to. The recordings are obviously the same. The difference comes down to encode and bit rate, and some here claim that that makes no difference because you can't hear the difference. If that is the case, regardless of what gear and what ears you have, there is no reason to bother with Tidal, Apple Music, Amazon or Qobuz when Spotify is the only service that is compatible across platforms, hardware and has the best usability of them all.
Comparing streaming services to asses bit rates and codec, is not reliable, as you don't know what else they have done to alter the presentation. The else is probably going to be more significant than the bit rate.

The only one of those you site that I have evaluated is Qobuz, and it sounded very good, but I am not a member. I stream from the BPO, BBC, Medici TV, Met Opera, DSO, Philadelphia Orchestra, our one MSO and SPCO. The latter audio is supplied by MPR. The Philadelphia Orchestra is provided by Bright Cove. The others have their own facilities. The BPO is now streaming in Atmos, lossless audio and 4K. The DSO has elaborate production facilities and the sound is very good. The BPO Atmos stream is a bit of a work in progress at the moment, but making rapid progress from what I can tell. I will make a full report on this landmark stream soon.

Again it is classical music programming and recording, that is really pushing the barriers and making fast progress. This has always been so, from the earliest days of audio. It was Enrico Caruso's first recording for Victor Talking Machine in 1904, that was the real starting gun that popularized recorded sound.

I can't stress enough that it is the total production that really counts. Concentrating on one issue is like concentrating on wire, or player you are going to use. A Holistic view is crucial to any intelligent evaluation.
 

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