5G Wireless Apocalypse: The RF Health-Risk Conspiracy

Wayde Robson

Wayde Robson

Audioholics Anchorman
The Fifth Generation of wireless networks (5G) is coming, and providers say it's going to revolutionize just about every area of technology. But, should we be concerned that new, even higher frequency RF waves are going to cover our living-spaces? There are those who believe there is evidence that man-made RF energy in our airspace is already doing us harm, and that 5G will push us over the top and create widespread, dire health consequences. Is 5G is an Illuminati plot to sterilize humankind, as some conspiracy theorists believe? Or, is 5G simply contributing more of an already bad thing for our health? The majority of the science still says RF signals are benign. But, if that's true, why do so many cell phone owners manuals warn against holding the phone too close to your body?

In this article we explore why many, even some researchers in the scientific community, think RF is physically harmful. We'll also look at the critical difference between ionizing and non-ionizing EMF, and the connection between RF and brain cancer. Is 5G the carrier for a public health apocalypse, or just a faster network?

Read the full article: 5G Apocalypse: The RF Health-Risk Conspiracy

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AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
The actual number of cases will continue to increase, but I haven't seen any proofs that cell phones and cell towers have caused an increased RATE of Diabetes, Heart Failure, or Cancer over the past 2 decades.

Maybe there are probably "audio-fools" in every field, including medicine, because people are people? :D

I'm thinking gluttony, sloth, and medical noncompliance are a lot more harmful than 5G and all the cell towers in the whole. :D
 
Wayde Robson

Wayde Robson

Audioholics Anchorman
The actual number of cases will continue to increase, but I haven't seen any proofs that cell phones and cell towers have caused an increased RATE of Diabetes, Heart Failure, or Cancer over the past 2 decades.
Yeah, there are a lot of illnesses on the rise, partly because we're better at finding them. In the article there's a study by a Dr. Kabat who tried to find any increase in the kinds of brain cancers associated with RF and cell phone use, long story short, there is no increase. He found in most first-world countries incidents of those cancers either stayed the same or decreased in the last 20 years.

IMHO, I think people love a good moral panic, especially around new technologies.
 
Wayde Robson

Wayde Robson

Audioholics Anchorman
I actually had a whole section on past tech moral panics in the article, but I had to cut it because it's just too long as it is.

But some of the past tech moral panics are quite funny to see today. When passenger trains went into use in the industrial age, people believed that women's uteruses would come flying out if they traveled at the speeds of trains. I found a lot of the past moral panics around technology specifically cited women and children as the primary victims. Today, we have that big bogeyman of cancer to hang on anything we don't trust or understand.

Don't get me wrong, there's a lot not to trust in the hype behind the "5G revolution". In Part 2, I'll get into what I believe are some of the legitimate dangers that I fear from the coming 5G networks. But they're really just extensions of what's already going on in nearly all consumer technology.
 
STRONGBADF1

STRONGBADF1

Audioholic Spartan
This is why we should always wear our tin foil hats!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
 
Phase 2

Phase 2

Audioholic Chief
What about all the others? Like Over the air TV? All them digital wave going right through us? Or microwave ovens?
 
Wayde Robson

Wayde Robson

Audioholics Anchorman
This is why we should always wear our tin foil hats!

Sent from my SM-G930V using Tapatalk
Funny, tinfoil hats aren't so crazy after all. They do protect you from "some" RF by creating what they call a faraday effect. It's why Chuck McGil in Better Call Saul would wrap himself in a metallic cloak for his "EMF sensitivity" symptoms.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
What about all the others? Like Over the air TV? All them digital wave going right through us? Or microwave ovens?
Funny, tinfoil hats aren't so crazy after all. They do protect you from "some" RF by creating what they call a faraday effect. It's why Chuck McGil in Better Call Saul would wrap himself in a metallic cloak for his "EMF sensitivity" symptoms.
Oh that's right. I cannot believe I totally forgot about that. There were like 2 whole seasons of this EMF crap on "Better Call Saul". :D
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
Nice timing on this article, since I just had a 5G connection installed this morning, and the speeds are crazy fast. In Ookla's speed test, I get a 1 ms latency to my provider's server about 20 miles away, with over 200 Mbps down and 75 Mbps up. I don't even get 1 ms of latency between computers on my local area network!
 
Irvrobinson

Irvrobinson

Audioholic Spartan
I don't even get 1 ms of latency between computers on my local area network!
You're seeing latencies higher than one millisecond on wired gigabit Ethernet between computers on your own LAN? How is that possible? The only way I can think of is multiple firewall hops. Just out of curiosity, what is your network topology and equipment?
 
T

Trell

Senior Audioholic
You're seeing latencies higher than one millisecond on wired gigabit Ethernet between computers on your own LAN? How is that possible? The only way I can think of is multiple firewall hops. Just out of curiosity, what is your network topology and equipment?
Some faults in cables or hardware could cause something like this. In my case on my home LAN it was a combination of both with intermittent problems of not good performance that was resolved with a new network cable to my main PC as well as replacing a switch. One peculiarity was that Internet speed tests gave consistently much better results in Chrome than in Firefox (weird, yeah).
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
You're seeing latencies higher than one millisecond on wired gigabit Ethernet between computers on your own LAN? How is that possible? The only way I can think of is multiple firewall hops. Just out of curiosity, what is your network topology and equipment?
Right now I am using a Gigabit ethernet switch with Cat 5e wiring. I should add that I have not pinged the computers in my home LAN for some years. But back years ago when I was using a 100mb hub, it was like 5 ms. Maybe that was a long delay, but for my purposes it was good enough, so I never cared.
 
T

Trell

Senior Audioholic
Right now I am using a Gigabit ethernet switch with Cat 5e wiring. I should add that I have not pinged the computers in my home LAN for some years. But back years ago when I was using a 100mb hub, it was like 5 ms. Maybe that was a long delay, but for my purposes it was good enough, so I never cared.
A hub? Must be quite a few years ago :D
 
Irvrobinson

Irvrobinson

Audioholic Spartan
Right now I am using a Gigabit ethernet switch with Cat 5e wiring. I should add that I have not pinged the computers in my home LAN for some years. But back years ago when I was using a 100mb hub, it was like 5 ms. Maybe that was a long delay, but for my purposes it was good enough, so I never cared.
With recent client computers and switches, like any Intel i3 CPU or better with integrated 1GbE running native Win10 or Linux 2.6 or higher (no VMM) connected through a 1GbE switch, I'd be surprised if latencies using TCP/IP exceeded 100us for a 64B ping, and I'd expect more like 50-60us.
 
Irvrobinson

Irvrobinson

Audioholic Spartan
To be honest, I can see how mandatory vaccinations would be an unethical law. I am not an anti-vaxxer, but I am not a big fan of forcing medical procedures on people either.
This is just an anti-vaccination web site. There are no other comparable "medical procedures" to vaccinations. Non-specialist scientists are not qualified to make "informed consent" decisions, no less uneducated, untrained parents. And the anti-vaccine movement seems focused on the measles vaccine at the moment, which is considered "optional" by the anti-science dummies, because many of them had measles as kids, and they think it's just "a bad cold with itchy spots". Unbelievable.

In most states you can be forced to allow medical treatment for your children, even if you are convinced that prayer is the better alternative, especially for infections where antibiotics are effective. In fact, depending on the state, your children can be placed in foster care if you refuse to let them be treated; constitutional protections for freedom of religion don't apply.

We already live with mandatory "procedures" that are more dangerous than vaccines. The use of seat belts and air bags in cars, to name two examples. I refuse to drive in cars without at least three-point seat belts (no 1965 Mustang driving or riding for me),but personally I hate the notion that airbags are mandatory because some people don't like to wear seat belts. Airbags are explosives. Or how about mandatory helmet laws?

And then there's smoking, banned pretty much everywhere in the US in public places now, but still allowed in private homes with children. Now there's an interesting moral question, where the science is obvious.
 
A

A.B.52

Audiophyte
How about relying on KGB research showing that human body emitts and absorbs electromagnetic waves from 6mm to 9mm - right within 5G specs. If currently people develop cancer because of 4G radiation - wait for Real cancer epidemic after 5G is implemented.
 
S

shadyJ

Speaker of the House
How about relying on KGB research showing that human body emitts and absorbs electromagnetic waves from 6mm to 9mm - right within 5G specs. If currently people develop cancer because of 4G radiation - wait for Real cancer epidemic after 5G is implemented.
"KGB research" s hardly the most reliable, peer-reviewed science out there.
 

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