JerryLove

JerryLove

Audioholic Samurai
It would make negligible difference. Both legs comes from the same transformer (a centered tapped single phase transformer) and feeder anyway. Also, the electrician(s) who did the installation has to follow codes and best practice that require them to try and balance the load on the two "legs", so even if you believe in the negligible benefits, it would be very difficult to put the "noisiest/dirtiest" loads on one leg anyway.

Another thing is, the 230/240 V load such as the drier and electric range are connected across the two legs, they both could draw heavy currents, and spill "dirt" too in some cases.

View attachment 35244
On top of all that, there's a shared neutral, a shared ground, and EF "noise" doesn't need a wire to travel; so the two wires, by being in proximity, will effect one-another.

Indeed: your power-supply will clean up most everything that's coming down the wire. If you have EF noise, it's almost certainly introduced *after* the power supply through RF interaction.
 
P

PENG

Audioholic Slumlord
On top of all that, there's a shared neutral, a shared ground, and EF "noise" doesn't need a wire to travel; so the two wires, by being in proximity, will effect one-another.

Indeed: your power-supply will clean up most everything that's coming down the wire. If you have EF noise, it's almost certainly introduced *after* the power supply through RF interaction.
Yep, can't believe internet hearsay, most of the time..
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
What's weird is my house has nothing but 20a breakers. All wire is rated for 20a breakers and outlets. The only outlets that are 20a are the ones for my fridge, garage freezer, and washer. None of those things require 20a breakers.
I had two 20a breakers installed for use of two outlets for my HT. Both have 15a plugs. Weird.
No this is standard operating procedure for better wiring jobs. This means that more current drawing devices can be plugged into one circuit.
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
My system consists of two separate 20 amp circuits, each run is approx 25-30' from breaker box. I utilized 10/2 wire for each run. One circuit is just for my amps.
I've been told that it also makes sense to isolate all 'noise making' devices to one of the legs in your breaker box, has anyone done that ?
Actually the experts suggest doing just the opposite. Besides which are the 'noise making' devices?
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
I suspect it's not just about the copper.
Because of the recepticle, only <=15A devices are plugged into 15A receptacles... so even if the circuit is 20A, there won't be a 20A draw through the receptacle. At most: a small portion will have to deal with 20A (though I suspect that the wire is unbroken in the daisy chain, so the outlet actually deals with 0A of what's down-stream.
In a daisy chain, all of the down-stream current passes thru the copper of the first receptacle.
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
Balancing the loads on the two legs (poles) of a 120V/120V system may work in a commercial or industrial building, but in a home most of the heavy loads are operated intermittently.
In a large audio system, there is a small advantage to having all the equipment on the same leg.
 
2

2channel lover

Audioholic Field Marshall
I was fortunate enough to be there for the electrical rough at my house...we ran 12-2 throughout most of the house...in the listening room I asked what would normally go there...I said change it to a 20 amp, and in addition to that I want one 20 amp circuit with 3 receptacles on the TV wall.

I really didn't need two 20 amp circuits, the 15 & 20 was plenty he told me...iirc it wasn't that much extra, why not?
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Ninja
No this is standard operating procedure for better wiring jobs. This means that more current drawing devices can be plugged into one circuit.
So why when I specifically requested 20a breakers and outlets did I get 15a outlets? That just sounds like they did what they felt like doing. Just like the plug in my office closet was supposed to be dedicated. It isn't.
 
JerryLove

JerryLove

Audioholic Samurai
I was fortunate enough to be there for the electrical rough at my house...we ran 12-2 throughout most of the house...in the listening room I asked what would normally go there...I said change it to a 20 amp, and in addition to that I want one 20 amp circuit with 3 receptacles on the TV wall.
Did similar on my last house.

On this one, got involved earlier (partially because I knew I would not be on-site) and had that put in the wiring diagram for the house.
 
JerryLove

JerryLove

Audioholic Samurai
In a daisy chain, all of the down-stream current passes thru the copper of the first receptacle.
In my switchbox, at least, the live wire is wrapped around the contact screw rather than terminated.

Current going to the second switch in the chain would touch the first switch, but I can see no reason it would interact with the first switch.

I've not looked at my outlets... but why would they be different? Why not run one contiguous wire?
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
In a large audio system, there is a small advantage to having all the equipment on the same leg.
interesting, for what reason(s) ?
It keeps all the chassis at about the same potential. So leakage/noise currents are reduced.

light circuits with dimmers on them for example
I was referring to all the audio components. But yes it's a good idea to have everything else (lights & appliances) on other circuits. And yes, some light dimmers are a great source of interference.
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
I've not looked at my outlets... but why would they be different? Why not run one contiguous wire?
In daisy-chain dual-receptacle wiring, what typically happens is. Each receptacle has 2 Hot screws and 2 Neutral screws. So the input cable attaches to one pair (H& N) and the output cable attaches to the other pair(H&N). So the copper has to be sized to handle 20 Amps.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Field Marshall
In a large audio system, there is a small advantage to having all the equipment on the same leg.

It keeps all the chassis at about the same potential. So leakage/noise currents are reduced.
Ok, but I'll keep both feeds as is ..........


I was referring to all the audio components. But yes it's a good idea to have everything else (lights & appliances) on other circuits. And yes, some light dimmers are a great source of interference.
Roger that !
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
In a daisy chain, all of the down-stream current passes thru the copper of the first receptacle.
And all subsequent outlet's copper if the load is at the end.
One reason to not use the push in method to wire it. I had to change to the screws using a heater at the end. All the outlets before got warm.
 
S

Speedskater

Audioholic Chief
Yes, those push-in, back-stab connections are real bad news. But there are some real nice receptacles that at first glance look like the back-stab ones. But the wire feeds thru the hole in the back to the screw on the side.
 

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