Why would someone chose buying a record over the HD Audio counterpart?

Do you prefer Records or HD Audio Files?

  • Vinyl is in my blood and I don't need anything else. I'm too invested to pull out now.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    17
Benni777

Benni777

Audioholic
I used to DJ and my vinyl collection might have topped out around 500 records before a bad breakup. Long story short wax had a certain sound to it. Maybe the fragments of dust which cause a mildly soothing sound. IDK, but I do enjoy a good record. That said I'm all about upping my game. Honestly, I've been streaming lately and am discontent with it. Maybe its the fact audio streams through my APP which has its own volume, then my computer which also has its own volume to my receiver which again has a volume to my speakers. You cant adjust two high and regulate the other. There's a sweet spot for all three volumes and the result is ok.

Anywho, I would like to experience better quality. So my journey begins.
 
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
Back in the 1980's when I was in the service I had well over 2000 LPs. Once CD's hit the scene I sold the majority of them for the simple reason that the second you drop the arm on vinyl, you destroy it and I don't care how expensive a cartridge, arm and turntable you have. My practice at the time was to record the LP to Cassette on the very first play of the LP, put it into its jacket and store it and to listen to the cassette's. CDs made them both obsolete.
Destroy is inaccurate term. I'm 60 and play the vinyl I had in my university days and it still sounds very clean, 42 years later as I took care of my records and table. Everything plays like it did when new.
 
WookieGR

WookieGR

Full Audioholic
I remember back in the 80's when a study was conducted about vinyl's longevity. It will start to deteriorate after the 4th play. It's really up to the care of the turntable/stylus and environment the record is stored that keeps it sounding great.

For an upcoming video, I tried to restore an old Fantasia LP from 1947 that was a dumpster save along with a old Kraftwerk record. Both were clearly water damaged and had some signs of mold. I subjected them to almost 2 hours of ultrasonic cleaning. I doubt I'll post it since my recent record cleaning video bombed but the records weren't in any worse condition sound wise than the brand new records I've bought lately. They sounded ok.

I suppose if they were only played 4 or 5 times in their lifetime before ending up in storage, passed around and eventually submerged in sewer floods. The records could actually still sound new if cleaned properly. It's all about clearing the grooves for the needle.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Back in the 1980's when I was in the service I had well over 2000 LPs. Once CD's hit the scene I sold the majority of them for the simple reason that the second you drop the arm on vinyl, you destroy it and I don't care how expensive a cartridge, arm and turntable you have. My practice at the time was to record the LP to Cassette on the very first play of the LP, put it into its jacket and store it and to listen to the cassette's. CDs made them both obsolete.
Your statement is absolutely false. Cecil E Watts did careful research with electron micrography and showed that a PU properly tracking at 3 GM or less did NOT cause permanent groove deformation. Back then 10 GM tracking forces were obsolete. Our Sugden/Connoisseur rig at our home back then tracked at 10 GM. The BBC were using the same rig. I as only a kid, but built a cartridge and arm that tracked at 3 GM. Cecil Watts paper stimulated other research. Decca and Ortofon met the challenge. Alastair Robertson-Aikman founded SME and made rapid advances in pickup arm design, as did Decca. The Garrard 301 turntable was introduced in 1953. It all came together very quickly.

I have played a vast number of LPs on the rig below since 1966, and they still play perfectly. You just need the right gear, obsessionally set up, and handle your records correctly.



In fact the LP has proved to be one of the most durable technologies for audio preservation ever. It out lasts magnetic tape significantly.
 
WookieGR

WookieGR

Full Audioholic
Your statement is absolutely false. Cecil E Watts did careful research with electron micrography and showed that a PU properly tracking at 3 GM or less did NOT cause permanent groove deformation. Back then 10 GM tracking forces were obsolete. Our Sugden/Connoisseur rig at our home back then tracked at 10 GM. The BBC were using the same rig. I as only a kid, but built a cartridge and arm that tracked at 3 GM. Cecil Watts paper stimulated other research. Decca and Ortofon met the challenge. Alastair Robertson-Aikman founded SME and made rapid advances in pickup arm design, as did Decca. The Garrard 301 turntable was introduced in 1953. It all came together very quickly.

I have played a vast number of LPs on the rig below since 1966, and they still play perfectly. You just need the right gear, obsessionally set up, and handle your records correctly.



In fact the LP has proved to be one of the most durable technologies for audio preservation ever. It out lasts magnetic tape significantly.
ok
 
MaxInValrico

MaxInValrico

Full Audioholic
Destroy is inaccurate term. I'm 60 and play the vinyl I had in my university days and it still sounds very clean, 42 years later as I took care of my records and table. Everything plays like it did when new.
Destroy was a little harsh. Degrade is better.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Destroy was a little harsh. Degrade is better.
That is not even true. An LP looked after and played on good well set up equipment will play as new after over half a century of use. That is my experience. With proper care the vinyl LP is the most durable medium ever introduced.
 
AcuDefTechGuy

AcuDefTechGuy

Audioholic Jedi
Why would anyone choose vinyl over higher resolution audio?

Because it makes them HAPPY. And that’s the only reason they need. ;)
 
Alex2507

Alex2507

Audioholic Slumlord
Why would anyone choose vinyl over higher resolution audio?

Because it makes them HAPPY. And that’s the only reason they need. ;)
We have to draw the line somewhere. You know, to divide happy from mental. Like no question the 8 track is mental.
 
MalVeauX

MalVeauX

Senior Audioholic
Vinyl makes sense from an audio perspective for records that were made and produced from an analog recording. You can't get more hifi than that because that's what it was (imperfections and limitations and all, completely reproduced, that's hifi).

New music that was recorded on a DAW, produced digitally, mastered digitally and then put onto a vinyl? That's just nostalgia or "retro cool" and adds nothing. If you just want the audio without compromise, you get the highest quality digital version of it.

There's argument for the reproduction, science, etc, of the audio capability and then there's just the emotional and psychoacoustic side of it. It's not wrong either way but it matters what perspective you take and what you value from it. People chanting vinyl's superiority on today's digitally produced music (virtually all of it) are parrots.

Very best,
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Vinyl makes sense from an audio perspective for records that were made and produced from an analog recording. You can't get more hifi than that because that's what it was (imperfections and limitations and all, completely reproduced, that's hifi).

New music that was recorded on a DAW, produced digitally, mastered digitally and then put onto a vinyl? That's just nostalgia or "retro cool" and adds nothing. If you just want the audio without compromise, you get the highest quality digital version of it.

There's argument for the reproduction, science, etc, of the audio capability and then there's just the emotional and psychoacoustic side of it. It's not wrong either way but it matters what perspective you take and what you value from it. People chanting vinyl's superiority on today's digitally produced music (virtually all of it) are parrots.

Very best,
There is an element of truth in what you say, but it is not the whole story.

There is a point in buying a CD version of an LP you own. I have done this to an extent, for my favorite LPs and bought the CD version.

Obviously a prime reason is to keep a pristine version. The other, and bigger issue, is bass response and dynamic range. Many quality masters have a dynamic range and better bass response than could be cut into the LPs unless it was dbx encoded. So the CD is actually often more faithful. The other issue is that digital recording preceded the CD by a significant margin,. The CD was actually many years ahead of the DAW. I used a rotating head PCM based system for live recording starting in 1984. Digital recordings by the commercial companies used DASH (Digital Audio Stationary Head). The advantage was the ability to edit without breaking down to analog. These machines used open reel magnetic tape machines, but the recording was digital. Computerized systems like the DAW did not become into use until the early two thousands. I built my first DAW in 2002. That was considered cutting edge then, and I had to pay for some professional advice on its design.

Now the big issue is deterioration of magnetic tape masters. These have a durability highly dependent on manufacturer of the tape, and production years. They are all over the map. So I would say you have to be careful of an old analog tape master digitalized many years after it was recorded. In that instance you are quite likely to be better off with the old LP made when the master was new.

I agree that there is no point in buying an LP cut from a computer based digital master. If that pleases you it is OK, but it is pointless.

This is all part of what has to be understood in the art of collecting.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
On the subject of 180 gm vinyl LPs. I've seen them advertised for sale at premium prices. Of course, I wondered what the greater weight accomplished.

Back in 1973-74, the first Arab Oil Embargo took place (it was really the Saudi Oil Embargo). The cost of new vinyl also increased. And as a result, the price of LPs increased while their audible quality also noticeably decreased. I was told at the time (by a record store owner, if I remember) that virgin vinyl was mixed with recycled vinyl to cut costs. And also, that compressed air was blown into the heated soft vinyl before it was pressed into an LP, expanding the vinyl, but leaving microscopic bubbles in the vinyl surface.

Any truth to those stories? Is that what 180 gm vinyl is about?
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
On the subject of 180 gm vinyl LPs. I've seen them advertised for sale at premium prices. Of course, I wondered what the greater weight accomplished.

Back in 1973-74, the first Arab Oil Embargo took place (it was really the Saudi Oil Embargo). The cost of new vinyl also increased. And as a result, the price of LPs increased while their audible quality also noticeably decreased. I was told at the time (by a record store owner, if I remember) that virgin vinyl was mixed with recycled vinyl to cut costs. And also, that compressed air was blown into the heated soft vinyl before it was pressed into an LP, expanding the vinyl, but leaving microscopic bubbles in the vinyl surface.

Any truth to those stories? Is that what 180 gm vinyl is about?
That is absolutely true, at least the part about reground vinyl. They did not even take the label off and ground it into the mix. Over time this paper comes to the surface, causes pops, and also can get the stylus stuck in the same groove. This process continues for years. I still have some discs from that period, with paper still coming up and protruding. That was a bad time for the LP. It was much worse on US pressings. I have to admit a few UK pressings were prone, but they stopped. I made a habit in that period of only buying imported European pressings. The Germans and Dutch did not get involved in this practice. US EMI Angel label pressings were very bad for this.

I have never heard of the compressed air, and I suspect this may have been thought by some to be the cause, but it was paper in the mix.
 
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