Why would someone chose buying a record over the HD Audio counterpart?

Do you prefer Records or HD Audio Files?

  • Vinyl is in my blood and I don't need anything else. I'm too invested to pull out now.

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    17
WookieGR

WookieGR

Full Audioholic
I purchased close to 90 LP's this year and my experience with them has been so underwhelming and heartbreaking that I have decided to abandon records for good. I've been collecting high resolution flac and DSD files ranging in quality from 24bit/96Khz, all the way up to DSD128 & SACD for the last 5 years or maybe slightly more. The majority of today's records are pressed from these exact digital sources. Mostly, gone are the days of high quality record pressings with a pure analog audio path. You need to buy records pre 1990's to start getting the lack of a digital audio path.

I hate to break the news to you but the majority of the music listening public is not doubling down on Jazz, Classical and Blues.

To me, the entire reason to buy a record is to listen to the artists unaltered pure analog sound without much or any manipulation. Yes, it's purely psychological. I want to live in that experience for the moments I have with the record because it's an even to play a record with all the cleaning and flipping required.

However, I just bought Neil Young's 180gm reissue of Harvest that is supposedly all analog. Great, that to me seems like the perfect reason to buy a record. Except... the record is mostly plagued by static and crackles. I gave it something close to an hours long wash in the Degritter Ultrasonic record cleaner and the noise is still there. The crap is in the pressing.

Same with several other records I bought this year. One in particular, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Beat The Devil's Tattoo was supposed to sound incredible due to it's recording and pressing but has far too many crackles and pops. Again, scrubbed the sh!it out of it for a long time in the Degritter and still sounds trash.

Other records are pressed off center causing them to swish in crackling.

Unfortunately, the bulk of my collection sounds this way. Not every single one, but most. All are new and sealed with no used titles at all. I can say that my equipment is not to blame since I have the 180gm Led Zeppelin titles pressed in Germany and they are fantastic. Clean and dynamic. The latest remaster of KISS - Destroyer on 2LP 180gm is amazing as well. So too are some others.

But not nearly the percentage of successes I need to justify keeping this hobby alive.

What irks me most about this is, I have the HD Audio versions of nearly every record I own and they are all superior to the records in every way. So what's the point really? Why would anyone today buy a new record when the 24bit/96Khz or greater edition can be bought on any of the several online stores for cheaper and sound way better with the proper gear?

With the amount of money people invest in turntables, stylus' that wear out, analog playback gear, tubes... I'm convinced that money could buy an amazing DAC and give you just the same or better results, especially considering LP's limited dynamic range. There's irony in those records you buy because they are already sourced from the digital files you can buy cheaper than the record probably cost and still not sound as good. There is this placebo effect that limited dynamics somehow creates a smoother more analog sound. The lack of clinicalness in the recording somehow sound more natural. Wrong

Who is still buying new records and what's your justification for listening to the vinyl pressing of that digital source file?

Please understand, this poll is about HD Audio with a minimum of 24Bit/88.2Khz, not MP3's or CD's. Technically, if one where to debate things to death, an audio CD could be considered lossy due to the fact it is the baseline minimum recording at 16Bit/44.1Khz and theoretically, could, under the proper circumstances sound inferior to it's vinyl counterpart.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Overlord
Everytime I think about collecting my Dad's old Dual Turntable and having it refurbished I quickly stop myself. I own no Vinyl and don't really care to.
I know the age-old arguments but really the only reason I even consider it is because having a TT is like a badge. For what? I don't rightly know. :p

Once I upgrade my computer I will focus much more on avoiding Streaming directly and switching to downloading or ripping HD files. My computer is just old enough that some of that functionality is just not available. I refuse to buy a separate device for this.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
Technically, if one where to debate things to death, an audio CD could be considered lossy due to the fact it is the baseline minimum recording at 16Bit/44.1Khz and theoretically, could, under the proper circumstances sound inferior to it's vinyl counterpart
Recordings are not done in 16bit/41.1 KHz but are downsampled to this for playback by consumer.

What of important is that recording, mixing and mastering is done well.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
I don’t stream from the internet but are listening to SACD/CD in my living room, or from ripped SACD/CD in my home office.

I’ve not owned a turntable for over three decades.
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
I stream all the time while I am working or in the car, where it matters less. Heavy listening is SACD or DVD-A on the main rig. I have vinyl too, but no TT for a few decades as well. I don't have a spot for it and don't really find it to be "superior", just another format, one that has many complications to go along with it compared to other formats lol.

Recordings are not done in 16bit/41.1 KHz but are downsampled to this for playback by consumer.

What of important is that recording, mixing and mastering is done well.
Yep. I have CD versions of very well recorded/mastered albums and even downsampled, they still sound great. Two examples: Cafe Blue by Patricia Barber and Jazz at the Pawnshop. I have the SACDs of them both, but have the CD of JatP and it still sounds phenomenal.

Just because you buy music that you love, it does not guarantee that it will be a fantastic recording/mastering, so you sort of need to either do the research about that album and format or just accept that you love the music and it doesn't matter if it has some cracks and pops.
 
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Mr Tape

Mr Tape

Enthusiast
I do both streaming and playing files from my computer, but I find that the process of taking a high quality record out of its sleeve and playing it to be more of a special occasion than playing a file. Also, records have much larger physical covers and deluxe editions frequently have booklets between the gatefold jacket complete with high quality photos and liner notes. Reading liner notes from a tablet on Roon is just not the same experience.

As far
 
witchdoctor

witchdoctor

Full Audioholic
The only thing I prefer about vinyl is the artwork on the jacket and the notes on the back. I prefer upmixing to MCH these days to two channel of any format (hirez, redbook, mp3, etc)
 
Replicant 7

Replicant 7

Audioholic Samurai
I stream all the time while I am working or in the car, where it matters less. Heavy listening is SACD or DVD-A on the main rig. I have vinyl too, but no TT for a few decades as well. I don't have a spot for it and don't really find it to be "superior", just another format, one that has many complications to go along with it compared to other formats lol.



Yep. I have CD versions of very well recorded/mastered albums and even downsampled, they still sound great. Two examples: Cafe Blue by Patricia Barber and Jazz at the Pawnshop. I have the SACDs of them both, but have the CD of JatP and it still sounds phenomenal.

Just because you buy music that you love, it does not guarantee that it will be a fantastic recording/mastering, so you sort of need to either do the research about that album and format or just accept that you love the music and it doesn't matter if it has some cracks and pops.
It's always about the love for two channel music. Purest, never will understand that. Analog rules!:D Come to think about it, I'm gonna upgrade my cartridge! Where's Doc at? Bet he gotta thing or two to say about TT's.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
I purchased close to 90 LP's this year and my experience with them has been so underwhelming and heartbreaking that I have decided to abandon records for good. I've been collecting high resolution flac and DSD files ranging in quality from 24bit/96Khz, all the way up to DSD128 & SACD for the last 5 years or maybe slightly more. The majority of today's records are pressed from these exact digital sources. Mostly, gone are the days of high quality record pressings with a pure analog audio path. You need to buy records pre 1990's to start getting the lack of a digital audio path.

I hate to break the news to you but the majority of the music listening public is not doubling down on Jazz, Classical and Blues.

To me, the entire reason to buy a record is to listen to the artists unaltered pure analog sound without much or any manipulation. Yes, it's purely psychological. I want to live in that experience for the moments I have with the record because it's an even to play a record with all the cleaning and flipping required.

However, I just bought Neil Young's 180gm reissue of Harvest that is supposedly all analog. Great, that to me seems like the perfect reason to buy a record. Except... the record is mostly plagued by static and crackles. I gave it something close to an hours long wash in the Degritter Ultrasonic record cleaner and the noise is still there. The crap is in the pressing.

Same with several other records I bought this year. One in particular, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Beat The Devil's Tattoo was supposed to sound incredible due to it's recording and pressing but has far too many crackles and pops. Again, scrubbed the sh!it out of it for a long time in the Degritter and still sounds trash.

Other records are pressed off center causing them to swish in crackling.

Unfortunately, the bulk of my collection sounds this way. Not every single one, but most. All are new and sealed with no used titles at all. I can say that my equipment is not to blame since I have the 180gm Led Zeppelin titles pressed in Germany and they are fantastic. Clean and dynamic. The latest remaster of KISS - Destroyer on 2LP 180gm is amazing as well. So too are some others.

But not nearly the percentage of successes I need to justify keeping this hobby alive.

What irks me most about this is, I have the HD Audio versions of nearly every record I own and they are all superior to the records in every way. So what's the point really? Why would anyone today buy a new record when the 24bit/96Khz or greater edition can be bought on any of the several online stores for cheaper and sound way better with the proper gear?

With the amount of money people invest in turntables, stylus' that wear out, analog playback gear, tubes... I'm convinced that money could buy an amazing DAC and give you just the same or better results, especially considering LP's limited dynamic range. There's irony in those records you buy because they are already sourced from the digital files you can buy cheaper than the record probably cost and still not sound as good. There is this placebo effect that limited dynamics somehow creates a smoother more analog sound. The lack of clinicalness in the recording somehow sound more natural. Wrong

Who is still buying new records and what's your justification for listening to the vinyl pressing of that digital source file?

Please understand, this poll is about HD Audio with a minimum of 24Bit/88.2Khz, not MP3's or CD's. Technically, if one where to debate things to death, an audio CD could be considered lossy due to the fact it is the baseline minimum recording at 16Bit/44.1Khz and theoretically, could, under the proper circumstances sound inferior to it's vinyl counterpart.
There are good reasons. The only two sensible ones are because you have a legacy collection, or you are collector and you want to seek out rare discs not available in digital form.

I have a large legacy collection. It is in good condition. I have bought very few LPs since the CD advent in 1984. I did buy quite a few discs though out of a large collection on eBay. This was from an estate collection of an owner who had superb equipment. All those discs were perfect and unblemished.

There are several issues about LP playing. Old LPs in general had superior manufacturing standards to most current offerings.

A turntable rig has to be to a very high standard and obsessionally set up. In addition handling and care of LPs has to be equally obsessional.

So, I agree that unless you are fascinated by the whole ethos of disc playing, have a legacy collection or want to collect rare discs, or music not otherwise available there is no pressing reason to get into LP reproduction. It is not something to undertake in a casual manner.

I own four turntables. All are vintage. Three I have owned for over fifty years, the other one, is a classic, that I restored after buying it cheap on eBay parts or repair.

It is complimentary to my reel to reel tape recorder collection and associated noise reduction units. It forms what I call the museum aspect of my system.

This is important, as playing equipment over a half century old in optimal condition shows actually that the progress we have made has been largely on convenience.

There is one other aspect to this, that in many ways recordings were far better engineered back then compared to now. Recording was a career with job security. Firms like EMI and Decca kept highly competent teams together over a long period of time. The results show.

I have astounded many visitors with the superb audio quality that can be obtained from these vintage pieces. These are items for view only, but to still savor and enjoy.

Many exotic modern efforts are full of the flavor of the day audiophoolery, whereas back then it was true research and engineering driven. It was not driven by over active imaginations.

Studio vintage turntable case.



Left to right Garrard 301 with Decca professional arm Decca cartridge H4E for LP and a Decca MK II for 78. Preamp is Quad 22 tube preamp with the codes to equalize pretty much any 78 RPM disc ever pressed. This has recently had a restoration and custom power supply with smoothing to HT and LT.

Middle is a Thorens TD 150, with SME series III arm and Shure V15 xmr. Preamp is Quad 44. On the left another Garrard 301, with SME series II improved, and Shure V15 xmr. Preamp is Quad 34.

Garrard Decca rig playing LP



Playing a 78 RPM disc.



Thorens TD 125 MKII with SME series III arm and Shure V15 xmr.



Preamp is Quad 34.



Disc reproduction is not plug and play. It takes experience and careful set up to get really good results. If you blindly forge into it, the overwhelming odds are for a poor result.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
It's always about the love for two channel music. Purest, never will understand that. Analog rules!:D Come to think about it, I'm gonna upgrade my cartridge! Where's Doc at? Bet he gotta thing or two to say about TT's.
What is your rig and cartridge that you want to upgrade?
 
Replicant 7

Replicant 7

Audioholic Samurai
What is your rig and cartridge that you want to upgrade?
Hey Doc, well I just cancelled my order on the Blue, well cause the TT I'm getting comes with the Blue. The spec's look good on the TT. Not the greatest but better than what I'm using now, a 13 year old Audio-Technica TT, AT-LP120. has the 95E cartridge (green) anyways. At 499.00 for the TT with the Blue cartridge. It is a belt drive, which umm I haven't been a big fan of belt TT's. I've always owned direct drive TT's. Now Doc, I'm not in any way in your league of TT's, hell you have cartridges probably cost more than my AVR. But I still have to have a TT in my setup always have always will.
Screenshot_20220810-173024~2.png

Edit:
This is the one I really want, maybe if I pinch myself I'll get it. Going for 899.00
Screenshot_20220810-175333~2.png
 
Last edited:
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Hey Doc, well I just cancelled my order on the Blue, well cause the TT I'm getting comes with the Blue. The spec's look good on the TT. Not the greatest but better than what I'm using now, a 13 year old Audio-Technica TT, AT-LP120. has the 95E cartridge (green) anyways. At 499.00 for the TT with the Blue cartridge. It is a belt drive, which umm I haven't been a big fan of belt TT's. I've always owned direct drive TT's. Now Doc, I'm not in any way in your league of TT's, hell you have cartridges probably cost more than my AVR. But I still have to have a TT in my setup always have always will.
View attachment 57232
Edit:
This is the one I really want, maybe if I pinch myself I'll get it. Going for 899.00
View attachment 57233
Those Fluance turntables have a good reputation. The Thorens I don't know a lot about. Thorens went broke in 1999 after the digital revolution. That was a shame as they pre-existed the gramophone, and built Swiss musical boxes of outstanding craftsmanship long before Berliner's disc. I have seen them up close. They exhibit incredible craftsmanship. Their early spring driven gramophones also exhibited outstanding craftsmanship. I was very sad when they declared bankruptcy. The company was bought out of the bankruptcy by Swiss business man Hans Rohrer. At first they made junk with no sub chassis. Now I understand Hans has seen the error of his ways, and the Thorens turntables seem to have regained a reputation for quality. I have never had a chance to examine any of their recent offerings up close. When the company restructured manufacturing was moved from Switzerland to Germany, where they are still made. The good news is it not China!
Since the Thorens comes with the Ortofon Blue, it is probably a very good bet.

Both my Thorens turntables were built before the bankruptcy. I bought TD 150 in March 1966. It was sold as customary then, with no arm and no plinth. None of my studio turntables were sold with plinth or PU, arm. In those days there was the assumption that the purchasers where competent. How things gave changed! Only the TD 125 Mk II came with a plinth. When I bought it, it had no arm, just the plinth and the turntable. So I had to find an SME III on eBay. I think the Thorens TD 150 was the first high quality European turntable to have a plinth as an option. The first Japanese turntables were starting to appear, and they all had plinths. So the dumbing down, and degrading of skills of the population has continued. I still have the template I made for the cut out of the Garrard 301s from many years past. It came with a paper plan (which I still have) of the cut out for the chassis. Then you were expected to make an accurate template for the final motor mounting board with a rip saw. Not really very difficult.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I purchased close to 90 LP's this year and my experience with them has been so underwhelming and heartbreaking that I have decided to abandon records for good. I've been collecting high resolution flac and DSD files ranging in quality from 24bit/96Khz, all the way up to DSD128 & SACD for the last 5 years or maybe slightly more. The majority of today's records are pressed from these exact digital sources. Mostly, gone are the days of high quality record pressings with a pure analog audio path. You need to buy records pre 1990's to start getting the lack of a digital audio path.

I hate to break the news to you but the majority of the music listening public is not doubling down on Jazz, Classical and Blues.

To me, the entire reason to buy a record is to listen to the artists unaltered pure analog sound without much or any manipulation. Yes, it's purely psychological. I want to live in that experience for the moments I have with the record because it's an even to play a record with all the cleaning and flipping required.

However, I just bought Neil Young's 180gm reissue of Harvest that is supposedly all analog. Great, that to me seems like the perfect reason to buy a record. Except... the record is mostly plagued by static and crackles. I gave it something close to an hours long wash in the Degritter Ultrasonic record cleaner and the noise is still there. The crap is in the pressing.

Same with several other records I bought this year. One in particular, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Beat The Devil's Tattoo was supposed to sound incredible due to it's recording and pressing but has far too many crackles and pops. Again, scrubbed the sh!it out of it for a long time in the Degritter and still sounds trash.

Other records are pressed off center causing them to swish in crackling.

Unfortunately, the bulk of my collection sounds this way. Not every single one, but most. All are new and sealed with no used titles at all. I can say that my equipment is not to blame since I have the 180gm Led Zeppelin titles pressed in Germany and they are fantastic. Clean and dynamic. The latest remaster of KISS - Destroyer on 2LP 180gm is amazing as well. So too are some others.

But not nearly the percentage of successes I need to justify keeping this hobby alive.

What irks me most about this is, I have the HD Audio versions of nearly every record I own and they are all superior to the records in every way. So what's the point really? Why would anyone today buy a new record when the 24bit/96Khz or greater edition can be bought on any of the several online stores for cheaper and sound way better with the proper gear?

With the amount of money people invest in turntables, stylus' that wear out, analog playback gear, tubes... I'm convinced that money could buy an amazing DAC and give you just the same or better results, especially considering LP's limited dynamic range. There's irony in those records you buy because they are already sourced from the digital files you can buy cheaper than the record probably cost and still not sound as good. There is this placebo effect that limited dynamics somehow creates a smoother more analog sound. The lack of clinicalness in the recording somehow sound more natural. Wrong

Who is still buying new records and what's your justification for listening to the vinyl pressing of that digital source file?

Please understand, this poll is about HD Audio with a minimum of 24Bit/88.2Khz, not MP3's or CD's. Technically, if one where to debate things to death, an audio CD could be considered lossy due to the fact it is the baseline minimum recording at 16Bit/44.1Khz and theoretically, could, under the proper circumstances sound inferior to it's vinyl counterpart.
If you buy bad pressings, are they new, or old? If they're new, you should be able to return the bad ones as 'defective'.
 
Replicant 7

Replicant 7

Audioholic Samurai
Those Fluance turntables have a good reputation. The Thorens I don't know a lot about. Thorens went broke in 1999 after the digital revolution. That was a shame as they pre-existed the gramophone, and built Swiss musical boxes of outstanding craftsmanship long before Berliner's disc. I have seen them up close. They exhibit incredible craftsmanship. Their early spring driven gramophones also exhibited outstanding craftsmanship. I was very sad when they declared bankruptcy. The company was bought out of the bankruptcy by Swiss business man Hans Rohrer. At first they made junk with no sub chassis. Now I understand Hans has seen the error of his ways, and the Thorens turntables seem to have regained a reputation for quality. I have never had a chance to examine any of their recent offerings up close. When the company restructured manufacturing was moved from Switzerland to Germany, where they are still made. The good news is it not China!
Since the Thorens comes with the Ortofon Blue, it is probably a very good bet.

Both my Thorens turntables were built before the bankruptcy. I bought TD 150 in March 1966. It was sold as customary then, with no arm and no plinth. None of my studio turntables were sold with plinth or PU, arm. In those days there was the assumption that the purchasers where competent. How things gave changed! Only the TD 125 Mk II came with a plinth. When I bought it, it had no arm, just the plinth and the turntable. So I had to find an SME III on eBay. I think the Thorens TD 150 was the first high quality European turntable to have a plinth as an option. The first Japanese turntables were starting to appear, and they all had plinths. So the dumbing down, and degrading of skills of the population has continued. I still have the template I made for the cut out of the Garrard 301s from many years past. It came with a paper plan (which I still have) of the cut out for the chassis. Then you were expected to make an accurate template for the final motor mounting board with a rip saw. Not really very difficult.
Thank you Doc, for sharing this, I'm looking still, I put the Fluance on hold back in my saved box. I'm wanting a TT without a built-in Pre-Amp. Those for some reason seem to jump way up in price. Your absolutely correct on Thorne TT, not being made in China. Swiss Germany craftsmanship is phenomenal say the least. My oldest Son and I are Vinyl enthusiast. He and I have conversations about turntables and cartridges all the time. He's the one who spotted that Thorne's TT and sent a link to me.
 
Last edited:
3db

3db

Audioholic Overlord
I still buy vinyl, both new and used and out of 50 or so over the last couple of years, there has only one LP I complained to the vendor about a new pressing and they sent me a free new pressing which was much better.
 
WookieGR

WookieGR

Full Audioholic
I have the Fluance RT85 and it's not bad. It sounds really nice with records that are properly pressed and is almost on par with the sound quality I get from HD digital master recordings. It's unforgiving with poor sounding records though. I have a few videos on my channel with the Fluance RT85 in them.
 
O

OHMisback

Audioholic
Thoren is a good TTs. I've own Thoren, Russco, Sparta, QRK. They are simple and VERY easy to mount most after market tonearms or a plinth.

I quit counting a while back. 40-50 pieces.

I use TD121/124 I & II mostly. TD145-166 are belt drive not belt/rim like 121/124. 121/124 are Transcription TT, and they have speed control for record/playback.

TD145-166 usually need a cap start kit, belt, cleaning, oil and a spring dampening kit.. (Gummy puffers or ear plugs) 50-100 usd

Thoren claims a 2030 TTs rumble is so low they don't even measure it. OK! It is quiet I must admit. They make some pretty expensive TT. Very popular
in vintage circles. The new TD124 (D direct drive) is over 10K They have 30-40k TT.

Russco, Sparta, QRK are Broadcast only. No need for speed control only a 1/4 turn full speed start, like Thoren transcriptions. 1/4-1/2 full speed start.

I use to rebuild 4-5 a year, Russco is my favorite for all around work. 100,000 hour with maintenance, then just rebuild it again.
Rim drives with fractional motors. They look like washing machine motors. They have a gear shifter, Russcos can leave a mess though. You have to oil the motors and service the things. Easy though.
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Samurai
Haven't purchased a new LP in many years. I only purchase used LPs on occasion for fun, if it's something that might be interesting. For example, I found a Box of Frogs LP that featured Jeff Beck on a number of tracks, along with a copy of Straight Shooter by James Gang (post Joe Walsh). Box of Frogs was 'meh' but Straight Shooter was pretty good. The crackles you learn to deal with on these old finds.

I keep my old LPs for nostalgia and because I do not have digital copies for all of them. I also inherited a number of LPs from my father which again hold a lot of nostalgia. Classical LPs that I grew up with and Christmas records like Sing Along with Mitch Miller. Anything new I prefer digital for the sound quality and convenience, but you're not going to find Dirk Steffens on high-res digital (German rock guitarist, 1976 release):
 
Teetertotter?

Teetertotter?

Full Audioholic
The thing I remember in 1963, was my roommate in the USAF, had a TT set-up. Boy I had better not touch it or I was DEAD MEAT. I did learn that there was a certain amount of gram weight to use on records, but forgot.

I was not into music until I bought an AkaiTape Deck in 1965 and a fellow had down the barracks hallway had a TT. I recorded from his TT and used the side speakers on the tape deck. That was when I was stationed in Okinawa. I had a shelf above my bed that the deck rested on. I recall that there were NO pops or crackles in my recorded music. That was 7th heaven.

Yup, those with a TT were their prized possessions back in my days. I prized my 4 Track. I can envision there are many TT hobbyists today. Intriguing
 
MaxInValrico

MaxInValrico

Full Audioholic
I purchased close to 90 LP's this year and my experience with them has been so underwhelming and heartbreaking that I have decided to abandon records for good. I've been collecting high resolution flac and DSD files ranging in quality from 24bit/96Khz, all the way up to DSD128 & SACD for the last 5 years or maybe slightly more. The majority of today's records are pressed from these exact digital sources. Mostly, gone are the days of high quality record pressings with a pure analog audio path. You need to buy records pre 1990's to start getting the lack of a digital audio path.

I hate to break the news to you but the majority of the music listening public is not doubling down on Jazz, Classical and Blues.

To me, the entire reason to buy a record is to listen to the artists unaltered pure analog sound without much or any manipulation. Yes, it's purely psychological. I want to live in that experience for the moments I have with the record because it's an even to play a record with all the cleaning and flipping required.

However, I just bought Neil Young's 180gm reissue of Harvest that is supposedly all analog. Great, that to me seems like the perfect reason to buy a record. Except... the record is mostly plagued by static and crackles. I gave it something close to an hours long wash in the Degritter Ultrasonic record cleaner and the noise is still there. The crap is in the pressing.

Same with several other records I bought this year. One in particular, Black Rebel Motorcycle Club – Beat The Devil's Tattoo was supposed to sound incredible due to it's recording and pressing but has far too many crackles and pops. Again, scrubbed the sh!it out of it for a long time in the Degritter and still sounds trash.

Other records are pressed off center causing them to swish in crackling.

Unfortunately, the bulk of my collection sounds this way. Not every single one, but most. All are new and sealed with no used titles at all. I can say that my equipment is not to blame since I have the 180gm Led Zeppelin titles pressed in Germany and they are fantastic. Clean and dynamic. The latest remaster of KISS - Destroyer on 2LP 180gm is amazing as well. So too are some others.

But not nearly the percentage of successes I need to justify keeping this hobby alive.

What irks me most about this is, I have the HD Audio versions of nearly every record I own and they are all superior to the records in every way. So what's the point really? Why would anyone today buy a new record when the 24bit/96Khz or greater edition can be bought on any of the several online stores for cheaper and sound way better with the proper gear?

With the amount of money people invest in turntables, stylus' that wear out, analog playback gear, tubes... I'm convinced that money could buy an amazing DAC and give you just the same or better results, especially considering LP's limited dynamic range. There's irony in those records you buy because they are already sourced from the digital files you can buy cheaper than the record probably cost and still not sound as good. There is this placebo effect that limited dynamics somehow creates a smoother more analog sound. The lack of clinicalness in the recording somehow sound more natural. Wrong

Who is still buying new records and what's your justification for listening to the vinyl pressing of that digital source file?

Please understand, this poll is about HD Audio with a minimum of 24Bit/88.2Khz, not MP3's or CD's. Technically, if one where to debate things to death, an audio CD could be considered lossy due to the fact it is the baseline minimum recording at 16Bit/44.1Khz and theoretically, could, under the proper circumstances sound inferior to it's vinyl counterpart.
Back in the 1980's when I was in the service I had well over 2000 LPs. Once CD's hit the scene I sold the majority of them for the simple reason that the second you drop the arm on vinyl, you destroy it and I don't care how expensive a cartridge, arm and turntable you have. My practice at the time was to record the LP to Cassette on the very first play of the LP, put it into its jacket and store it and to listen to the cassette's. CDs made them both obsolete.
 
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