Which 12 AWG speaker cable to choose

J

jakkedtide

Audioholic
Oops 15 amp is 14/2. 20 amp is 12/2.

Its not stranded so how does that change how the sound would be? Obviously not easy to work with but copper is copper....
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Overlord
Its not stranded so how does that change how the sound would be? Obviously not easy to work with but copper is copper....
According to any evidence I’ve seen, any good quality conductor should not “have a sound” to it, which is to say that the electrical signal should not somehow be altered or otherwise affected in the transmission of an electrical signal.
The ease of use is more the issue with stranded vs solid being more flexible and easier to work with.

FWIW, there's also this video from Gene... doesn't discus solid conductors, but is great for demonstrating what cable performance is in a range of different quality cables.
 
Teetertotter?

Teetertotter?

Full Audioholic
Whether you use solid or stranded 99.9% copper wiring, avoid any sharp corners that would restrict the electrical current flow to your speakers. A generous size radius is recommended.
 
Last edited:
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Whether you use solid or stranded 99.9% copper wiring, avoid any sharp corners that would restrict the electrical current flow to your speakers. A generous size radius is recommended.
What are you talking about? Speaker wire doesn't need to have large radius bends, that's for cabling that transfers extremely high frequencies and is small gauge. The rule of thumb for bend radius is four times the diameter.
 
Last edited:
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Whether you use solid or stranded 99.9% copper wiring, avoid any sharp corners that would restrict the electrical current flow to your speakers. A generous size radius is recommended.
Electrical wire bends will never affect power conduction. Electricity is not a liquid.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
Whether you use solid or stranded 99.9% copper wiring, avoid any sharp corners that would restrict the electrical current flow to your speakers. A generous size radius is recommended.
Yep, we don't want anything lost due to a tight bend, even if 11 is on the volume control. :D:D:D
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
What are you taking about? Speaker wire doesn't need to have large radius bends, that's for cabling that transfers extremely high frequencies and is small gauge. The rule of thumb for bend radius is four times the diameter.
This has nothing to do with FR! It has everything to do with being able to pull it through conduit without breaking the cable. So a turn radius is an important parameter, so you set the pipe bender correctly. You bend and install the conduit and then pull the cable. Finding you can not pull the cables is a big oops! So to have that turn radius spec, is vital in drawing up your plans, building ang laying out the conduit. If you are smart and don't want trouble you exceed the specified turning radius somewhat.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
This has nothing to do with FR! It has everything to do with being able to pull it through conduit without breaking the cable. So a turn radius is an important parameter, so you set the pipe bender correctly. You bend and install the conduit and then pull the cable. Finding you can not pull the cables is a big oops! So to have that turn radius spec, is vital in drawing up your plans, building and laying out the conduit. If you are smart and don't want trouble you exceed the specified turning radius somewhat.
WRT bend radius, I'm actually referring to bandwidth and data throughput more than audio/video frequency response but with HD video, it does apply. For speaker wiring, it doesn't really matter unless it's being pinched.

FYI for those who consider installing their own data cabling, Cat5e maximum pull is 25 pounds. Exceeding that causes stretching and altering the twist rate. Cat6 and higher can be pulled with more force, but mot much more and it should be pulled carefully in all cases.

The bend radius I mentioned is for bare cable, where it could drop over/through/around framing and that doesn't mean the edges are rounded like the newer lumber, old framing had a very crisp edge. Cabling that won't need to be changed (voice/data infrastructure, typically) isn't always in conduit.

You're assuming the plans include this when almost nobody other than Low Voltage installers/contractors (the ones who actually care) and cable manufacturers (who may have been the ones who tested cables to find the effects). You may be thinking in terms of your residential experiences, but in conduit, the only real concerns are:

Does it have too many right angles? (Not supposed to exceed 180° total without additional pull boxes)
Does it have enough pull boxes on long runs (greater than 100')?
Will the cables snag on the joints?
Is the conduit filled to >65%?

Most contractors don't understand, nor do they generally care, about the care and handling of cabling- they want it done quickly and as cheaply as possible UNLESS they're a design/build firm that relies on repeat business.

You wouldn't believe some of the terrible work that's out there.
 
Last edited:
newsletter

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top