Webb Space Telescope

mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
I am a bit confused about its orbit around the sun at 1.5million km further out from earth.
The animation also shows it is orbiting at that point or going in circles out there while going around the sun. Why can't it just orbit around the sun without orbiting or circling around that theoretical L2 point.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
I am a bit confused about its orbit around the sun at 1.5million km further out from earth.
The animation also shows it is orbiting at that point or going in circles out there while going around the sun. Why can't it just orbit around the sun without orbiting or circling around that theoretical L2 point.
I don't have the academic steez to define it, but:

:D
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
I don't have the academic steez to define it, but:

:D
Thanks. While it explains those 5 L points, I am not sure it mentioned or explained the need to stabilize L2 point by having it orbit that L2 point, or the drawing is a representation of the 23rd day adjustments become an orbit of that point. Just trying to understand the need for that orbit around L2.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
Orbiting between earth and mars… but much closer to earth.

I believe the orbit around the Lagrange point requires less fuel than if it were trying to be completely stable in that point.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
So its orbit is somewhere between earth and mars?
Yes, 1.5 million km away from earth's orbit. So, in essence it's a geosynchronous location out there, always on the same radii around the sun with the earth's radii, no leading or lagging in that orbit. Relative to Webb, earth is always between it and the sun as if it was the same bicycle spoke, Webb at the tire and earth a bit inward on the same spoke.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja
Orbiting between earth and mars… but much closer to earth.

I believe the orbit around the Lagrange point requires less fuel than if it were trying to be completely stable in that point.
Thanks.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja
Yes, 1.5 million km away from earth's orbit. So, in essence it's a geosynchronous location out there, always on the same radii around the sun with the earth's radii, no leading or lagging in that orbit. Relative to Webb, earth is always between it and the sun as if it was the same bicycle spoke, Webb at the tire and earth a bit inward on the same spoke.
Thanks
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
According to space.com, the thruster will fire at 2pm EST to begin the insertion into orbit at L2. Previous reports have indicated this process to take half a day.
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja
So will L2 be the final destination? I know I could google it but you seem on top of it. :)
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
So will L2 be the final destination? I know I could google it but you seem on top of it. :)
Yes. Once there, they will begin the slow process of fine tuning the mirrors as the business end continues cooling to its planned operating temperature of:
about 37 kelvins (minus 393 Fahrenheit/ minus 236 Celsius)
:)
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja
Yes. Once there, they will begin the slow process of fine tuning the mirrors as the business end continues cooling to its planned operating temperature of:

:)
Thanks again. I can't wait to see the pics this telescope will bring us. :)
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
Thanks again. I can't wait to see the pics this telescope will bring us. :)
I think they’re talking sometime in April for the 18 segments to be focused. ;)
We still have a long ways to go.
 
Trell

Trell

Audioholic Ninja
Thanks what will happen to the Hubbel then?

>>>
How long is Hubble expected to remain operational?

When Hubble launched in 1990, it was expected to have a lifespan of about 15 years. Largely because of five successful astronaut servicing missions to the telescope, Hubble’s technology was upgraded and improved, and the telescope remains scientifically productive to this day. All indications are that the telescope will continue operating into the late 2020s and possibly beyond.
<<<
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja

>>>
How long is Hubble expected to remain operational?

When Hubble launched in 1990, it was expected to have a lifespan of about 15 years. Largely because of five successful astronaut servicing missions to the telescope, Hubble’s technology was upgraded and improved, and the telescope remains scientifically productive to this day. All indications are that the telescope will continue operating into the late 2020s and possibly beyond.
<<<
Thanks man :)
 
haraldo

haraldo

Audioholic Spartan
The prospect of being able to see the first galaxies is to me mind boggling, I can´t wait to see what James Webb Telescope will bring in.... maybe we can also get some better shots of black holes.... wow this is gonna be way cool :cool:
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
Yes. Hubble could be up there for a long time as it can be serviced unlike Webb with its distance and planned life of about 10 years.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
The prospect of being able to see the first galaxies is to me mind boggling, I can´t wait to see what James Webb Telescope will bring in.... maybe we can also get some better shots of black holes.... wow this is gonna be way cool :cool:
You mean those black holes will not be so black to Webb? ;) :D
 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Ninja
Any of you peeps ever visited NASA at cape Kennedy in Florida? That was one very informative visit. Stayed there all day and could have easily gone a second.
 
newsletter

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top