C

cameron paterson

Senior Audioholic
No just being careful. The amp cost me 650 bucks if I remember correctly!
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
No just being careful. The amp cost me 650 bucks if I remember correctly!
I've got 5 XLS amps and haven't had any issues at all with them over the years whether or not on a surge strip, YMMV. If worried and own your own home I'd go whole home style. (but no whole home myself, just not an issue that needs such around here).
 
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Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Samurai
Not help but protection from surges...
While there is no guarantee against lightning surges (besides unplugging equipment), the recommended protection for home audio / theatre equipment is 2,000 joules and above.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Power conditioners and surge protectors are different things.

For decent Surge Protectors /Power Strips, look at APC and TrippLite.

Unless you live somewhere with seriously wonky power, you should have no reason for a power conditioner.
Tell that to the people behind the National Electrical Code (NEC- the agency, not the company)- whole house surge protection devices are a code requirement for new homes as of Fall, 2020.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
FWIW- I chose a Panamax because it shuts down below 90VAC and above 140VAC- last week when we had a bad storm, it shut off just before the power went out for about 15 minutes. When it came on again, it wasn't finished- it came on and went out about 5 times in quick succession and I was glad the Panamax was still off. While this storm had a lot of lightning, most of it was not very close to my house but the majority of the damage was from the wind blowing trees down, taking out the power lines. I have never lost a piece of equipment to surges.

I don't have a whole house device, yet- best practice is to use one of those and then add local protection for the surges that come from inside of the house, from motors and switches.
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
Tell that to the people behind the National Electrical Code (NEC- the agency, not the company)- whole house surge protection devices are a code requirement for new homes as of Fall, 2020.
I’ve seen you mention that before… I just don’t know too many folk building houses in the last 2 years.

I’m going to have our electrical guy install one next time we do a project with him.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I’ve seen you mention that before… I just don’t know too many folk building houses in the last 2 years.

I’m going to have our electrical guy install one next time we do a project with him.
Go for a drive- people are definitely building, but the houses aren't particularly small unless they have some kind of government kicker to help with the cost and that went through the roof when COVID hit. Lumber prices are coming down, but not very fast. I heard that one reason is the Canadian government is reducing the amount of old growth trees that can be harvested.
 
-Jim-

-Jim-

Audioholic Chief
Gents, the US Government imposed extra Tariffs on Lumber coming from Canada, (in an effort to make the US domestic suppliers more competitive) and that, along with a reduced cut=> due mostly to a huge Pine Beetle infestation out west, limited supply. This was the first big bump up in retail prices.

All folks misread the market when Covid hit. The pandemic early on caused Canadian companies to restrict access to the forests to try to prevent spreading the disease (before vaccines) and they too expected the housing market in the USA to collapse. (Sort of a double whammy.) They also expected the Tarriffs to reduce the demand for imported wood. So they didn't even cut all the wood they had planned.

Of course, sort of like cars, no one anticipated the Covid behavior of the US Consumer, who was staying home and not traveling and spending their money. So a lot of them decided to build a new fence, add a Rec Room, hire a contractor to re-model, or even buy a new house. This created a large surge in demand against a short supply of product, which really drove up prices.

As the US Consumer has diverted their attention (somewhat) back to travelling, vacations, etc. (Aren't US Domestic Flying rates back to pre-pandemic levels?) Demand has fallen somewhat as have prices. The expectation is for them not to fall to below pre-pandemic levels as supply is now being restricted by major wildfires out west.

I hope this was interesting...
 
C

cameron paterson

Senior Audioholic
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