Speaker Wire and Electromagnetic Fields

CB22

CB22

Audioholic
Ratings
55 2
#1
I never cared much science in high school but I've always found it interesting when it comes to sound.

The problem: the speakers cables were near my light dimmer and caused the light dimmer not to work. Could I get special light dimmers on a remote designed for home AV? sure, but I did not want to drop the $ on that.

What I learned: everything that carries an electrical signal puts out an electromagnetic field.
From Wiki, "An electromagnetic field is a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. It affects the behavior of charged objects in the vicinity of the field."

The solution: The fix to this problem was Ferrite Iron. (see pics below). So these things snap around your cables and help to tone down electromagnetic fields. After putting these on some of the speakers cables near the light/ fan dimmer it worked perfectly.

See below:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_bead


Just thought I'd share this with yall, I found it interesting.
 

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lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Warlord
Ratings
3,375 16 36
#3
My plasma tv even came with RF chokes in the box. FWIW noise in audio systems have been known to be caused by dimmers in use and without the wires necessarily being in close proximity, just by being in the circuit.
 
S

Speedskater

Senior Audioholic
Ratings
148 1
#4
My plasma tv even came with RF chokes in the box.
That's because plasma TV's are a known source of lots of interference. In the past, Ham radio operators would compline when a neighbor got a new plasma TV. Don't think that they are selling many plasma TV's these days.

FWIW noise in audio systems have been known to be caused by dimmers in use and without the wires necessarily being in close proximity, just by being in the circuit.
Yep, dimmers with wires in the walls and ceiling (that acted as antennas) were another good source of interference. But they figured that out and started making quite dimmers.

* * * * * * * *
Speaker cables, the two wires have current flowing in opposite directions, so the fields of the two wires cancel out.

Remote control dimmers always seem to have a little Black Magic. Sometimes they don't work when the should.
 
P

pewternhrata

Full Audioholic
Ratings
77 1
#5
Guess its along the same line, not to jack this, but anyone have issues with led bulbs causing wifi dropouts? I haven't, but this post got me a little curious.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Warlord
Ratings
2,511 8 4
#7
That's because plasma TV's are a known source of lots of interference. In the past, Ham radio operators would compline when a neighbor got a new plasma TV. Don't think that they are selling many plasma TV's these days.


Yep, dimmers with wires in the walls and ceiling (that acted as antennas) were another good source of interference. But they figured that out and started making quite dimmers.

* * * * * * * *
Speaker cables, the two wires have current flowing in opposite directions, so the fields of the two wires cancel out.

Remote control dimmers always seem to have a little Black Magic. Sometimes they don't work when the should.
For as much interference as ham radio operators produced over decades, it serves them right.

Also, Plasma TVs aren't made now because of California's energy restrictions. While it's true that a plasma uses more energy, it's not a universally accepted POV that even OLED is as good. Subject to much debate, of course.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Warlord
Ratings
2,511 8 4
#8
I never cared much science in high school but I've always found it interesting when it comes to sound.

The problem: the speakers cables were near my light dimmer and caused the light dimmer not to work. Could I get special light dimmers on a remote designed for home AV? sure, but I did not want to drop the $ on that.

What I learned: everything that carries an electrical signal puts out an electromagnetic field.
From Wiki, "An electromagnetic field is a physical field produced by electrically charged objects. It affects the behavior of charged objects in the vicinity of the field."

The solution: The fix to this problem was Ferrite Iron. (see pics below). So these things snap around your cables and help to tone down electromagnetic fields. After putting these on some of the speakers cables near the light/ fan dimmer it worked perfectly.

See below:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ferrite_bead


Just thought I'd share this with yall, I found it interesting.
I have never heard of a dimmer not working due to any other kind of cable being near it. What brand and model?
 

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