Panasonic DMP-BD85 Uncooperative

GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
So, I thought I'd watch Saving Private Ryan this evening, but the BD would not play. Tried cleaning it - no dice. Turned the BD player off and on - didn't help.

So, I tried some different BDs. Some played, some didn't. Tried a few DVDs and they all played.

I'd say maybe a third of the BDs that tried would play. The player has been acting up over the last few months - BDs wouldn't play. But, all it took was to power down and back up or wipe the disc and I'd be back in business.

This evening, I wasn't having that much luck. Any ideas as to what might be going on? It's 10-11 years old now - might be on it's way to the grave?
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Hmmm, is this a DIY thing? Never tried it before.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Hmmm, is this a DIY thing? Never tried it before.
There are three lasers in a BD player, each with it own lens. One for CD, one for DVD and one for BD. The BD lens is most prone to fouling because of the very short wavelengths involved.

They do have cleaning discs available, like this one. These often work, but if they fail, then you have to do some dismantling and gently wipe the lenses with a Q-tip soaked in pure isopropyl alcohol.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Hmmm, is this a DIY thing? Never tried it before.
It's not that complicated:



As a matter of fact, I have that disc which I bought many years ago. I used it once on my OPPO BDP-95 player while trying to solve a problem. However, the lens was not causing it.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
There are three lasers in a BD player, each with it own lens. One for CD, one for DVD and one for BD. The BD lens is most prone to fouling because of the very short wavelengths involved.

They do have cleaning discs available, like this one. These often work, but if they fail, then you have to do some dismantling and gently wipe the lenses with a Q-tip soaked in pure isopropyl alcohol.
Thanks Doc, I'll give that a try.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Well, I ordered the cleaning disc, which arrived yesterday. Tried it in the BDP for 2 or 3 attempts without success. Did a bit of research and cleaned the lens with alcohol on a Q-tip. No dice. Took it apart and cleaned it again. Still not reading discs. In fact, after cleaning it with alcohol, it wouldn't read any blu rays at all.

I should note that although @TLS Guy stated that there are 3 lasers, I could only see two, which I cleaned.
20211024_145316_resized.jpg
 
Last edited:
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Since cleaning didn't help and repair would probably be uneconomical, I replaced the unit with a DMP-BD94. Back in business.

That is all.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
So, I thought I'd watch Saving Private Ryan this evening, but the BD would not play. Tried cleaning it - no dice. Turned the BD player off and on - didn't help.

So, I tried some different BDs. Some played, some didn't. Tried a few DVDs and they all played.

I'd say maybe a third of the BDs that tried would play. The player has been acting up over the last few months - BDs wouldn't play. But, all it took was to power down and back up or wipe the disc and I'd be back in business.

This evening, I wasn't having that much luck. Any ideas as to what might be going on? It's 10-11 years old now - might be on it's way to the grave?
Can you check for firmware updates?
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Since cleaning didn't help and repair would probably be uneconomical, I replaced the unit with a DMP-BD94. Back in business.

That is all.
That unit must be as good as anything else that sells for about $110. I've noticed that many manufacturers no longer publish as much technical info when listing specs. As an example, I didn't see any indication of the audio frequency response in the owner's manual for your DMP-BD94.

Sony does not specify it either in the Owner's Manual for their UBP-X800, and it is most likely the same omission with all their other current models.

But OPPO always had published that specification. For instance, for the UDP-203 player which I own, they specify:
Frequency: 20Hz-48kHz (± 0.2dB), 20Hz - 96kHz (-4dB - +0.05dB)

I'm convinced that the OPPO brand will be missed for awhile.
 
Last edited:
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
That unit must be as good as anything else that sells for about $110. I've noticed that many manufacturers no longer publish as much technical info when listing specs. As an example, I didn't see any indication of the audio frequency response in the owner's manual for your DMP-BD94.

Sony does not specify it either in the Owner's Manual for their UBP-X800, and it is most likely the same omission with all their other current models.

But OPPO always had published that specification. For instance, for the UDP-203 player which I own, they specify:
Frequency: 20Hz-48kHz (± 0.2dB), 20Hz - 96kHz (-4dB - +0.05dB)

I'm convinced that the OPPO brand will be missed for awhile.
Hmmm, I wouldn't have thought that the audio frequency response of a BD player was an important spec. I have to say, I didn't do much research in my search for a replacement. I just looked for the latest successor to the DMP-BD85. The price was right, so I bought it and called it a day.

Since my projector is not 4K capable and I don't intend to replace it anytime soon, I didn't see any benefit in spending 3X more for a 4K disc player.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Hmmm, I wouldn't have thought that the audio frequency response of a BD player was an important spec. I have to say, I didn't do much research in my search for a replacement. I just looked for the latest successor to the DMP-BD85. The price was right, so I bought it and called it a day.

Since my projector is not 4K capable and I don't intend to replace it anytime soon, I didn't see any benefit in spending 3X more for a 4K disc player.
In the Panasonic DP-UB420 4K Blu-ray player owner's manual, you can see a weird audio setting for simulating tube amp sound:

≥ Digital Tube Sound :
This feature gives you a warm sound, like that
produced by a vacuum tube amplifier.
Recommended setting
∫ Sound Effect Frequency
Set the maximum sampling frequency for the
audio selected in “Sound Effects”.
≥ Even when “96/88.2kHz” is selected, an audio
source with a sampling frequency of 96 kHz or
higher will be output with the original sampling
frequency.
≥ When “Sound Effects” is set to “Off”, this setting
is disabled.
∫ DSD Decode Sampling Frequency
Select the settings that suit your sound quality
preferences.
∫ DSD LPF Setting
Select the settings that suit your sound quality
preferences.
∫ Dialog Enhancer*2
The volume of the center channel is raised to
make dialog easier to hear.
∫ High Clarity Sound
Stop processing signals that affect the audio
quality to make the audio quality clearer. ( 31)
Select whether or not to output images.
This setting is able to switch by pressing green
button on the remote control during music
playback.
≥ If “On (Video Off)” is selected, the setting will be
canceled after you play back a video.
*1 Not every function can be set individually.
*2 This function is effective only when “Digital Audio Output” is
set to “PCM” ( 31).
∫ Signal Format
∫ Pop-Out Level
3D position for the Option menu or message
screen, etc. can be adjusted during 3D playback.
Audio Settings
Remaster 1 Pop and rock
Remaster 2 Jazz
Remaster 3 Classical
Digital Tube
Sound 1 A crisp, delicate sound
Digital Tube
Sound 2 A tight, hi-fi sound
Digital Tube
Sound 3 A soft, rich sound
Digital Tube
Sound 4 A clear, powerful sound
Digital Tube
Sound 5
A distinctive mid-range
sound
Digital Tube
Sound 6 A soft, enveloping sound

What do you think of that? Isn't that silly? :eek:
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
In the Panasonic DP-UB420 4K Blu-ray player owner's manual, you can see a weird audio setting for simulating tube amp sound:

≥ Digital Tube Sound :
This feature gives you a warm sound, like that
produced by a vacuum tube amplifier.
Recommended setting
∫ Sound Effect Frequency
Set the maximum sampling frequency for the
audio selected in “Sound Effects”.
≥ Even when “96/88.2kHz” is selected, an audio
source with a sampling frequency of 96 kHz or
higher will be output with the original sampling
frequency.
≥ When “Sound Effects” is set to “Off”, this setting
is disabled.
∫ DSD Decode Sampling Frequency
Select the settings that suit your sound quality
preferences.
∫ DSD LPF Setting
Select the settings that suit your sound quality
preferences.
∫ Dialog Enhancer*2
The volume of the center channel is raised to
make dialog easier to hear.
∫ High Clarity Sound
Stop processing signals that affect the audio
quality to make the audio quality clearer. ( 31)
Select whether or not to output images.
This setting is able to switch by pressing green
button on the remote control during music
playback.
≥ If “On (Video Off)” is selected, the setting will be
canceled after you play back a video.
*1 Not every function can be set individually.
*2 This function is effective only when “Digital Audio Output” is
set to “PCM” ( 31).
∫ Signal Format
∫ Pop-Out Level
3D position for the Option menu or message
screen, etc. can be adjusted during 3D playback.
Audio Settings
Remaster 1 Pop and rock
Remaster 2 Jazz
Remaster 3 Classical
Digital Tube
Sound 1 A crisp, delicate sound
Digital Tube
Sound 2 A tight, hi-fi sound
Digital Tube
Sound 3 A soft, rich sound
Digital Tube
Sound 4 A clear, powerful sound
Digital Tube
Sound 5
A distinctive mid-range
sound
Digital Tube
Sound 6 A soft, enveloping sound

What do you think of that? Isn't that silly? :eek:
Silly indeed.

Never mind "Digital Tube Sound" :rolleyes: , I don't understand why companies add audio processing to video components at all. Same applies to AVRs with video processing features. I just don't get it.
 

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