OLED Brightness and Color

C

cpd

Audioholic
You can't use cardboard or anything else. You actually have to put it up and watch TV on it. This is a fallacy of human perception. Thinking you can throw some measurements up and know how your eye is going to work. You just can't.

In time after time after time after time, the number one complaint people have after buying a TV is that they wish they had gotten the next size larger.

I've convinced clients for years to get a bigger TV than they wanted to buy, and often I'm not selling them the TV in the first place. So, no profit for me on the TV sale. The goal is to get the right size for the viewing distance. At 9', you can easily support a 75" display. It takes a few hours of viewing before you wondered why you worried about it being too large at all. I've had weekend installations where people have thanked me before I left for insisting they purchase much larger than they had planned for. I have NEVER had someone wish they had moved to a smaller size ever.
This couldn't be more true. Last January I replaced my 65" Panny plasma with a 77" LG CX. Primary seating is about 12 feet away. Now I wish I would have gotten the 83".
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
I am sure it will seem plenty bright, especially compared to my plasma from 2012 :)
Yep, I've got a plasma from around there too, and while my plasma is still excellent, it's clear the replacement tech is OLED.

I honestly was expecting it to be dim from what I had read, so I'm glad to be surprised.
 
BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
...can the TV be hung off center on the mount...
A TV can slide left to right on the mount up to the full range that the mount allows. I'm not sure what mount you have, but I almost always go with an ultrawide mount. This way I get a great deal more flexibility in my left to right placement. Many mounts are only about 20" wide which means that not only do you have very limited left to right movement, but you also are very limited on what studs you can put the mount on. Wider mounts allow you to definitely land your bolts onto at least 2 studs and still center the display to wherever it is being mounted. It also typically allows the mount to be placed a bit off center, which gives you even more overall flexibility.

I just had a client who wanted their TV mounted about a foot to the right of the center of the existing mount. I was able to use the existing holes, move the mount over to the right, using the same holes in the wall, I put the mount up as far to the right as it would go, then I hung the TV on the far right side of the wall plate. It worked very well and no new holes needed to go into the wall.

This is the model I've used over the years a number of times...

It is over 3.5 feet wide. So, it can give really wide movement coverage. Unfortunately, out of stock at the moment.

This model is actually in stock, but it is about a foot narrower. Still, at 33" wide it will give much more adjustment left to right than a standard wall mount which may only include a 16" wide wall plate...

...or a (not so good) model like this one which costs more and only has a 24" wide wall plate...
 
T

TechToys2

Audioholic
A TV can slide left to right on the mount up to the full range that the mount allows. I'm not sure what mount you have, but I almost always go with an ultrawide mount. This way I get a great deal more flexibility in my left to right placement.
Thanks. I haven't purchased a mount yet, so that's helpful. Until I buy something I am planning to use the stock stand initially and create a "phantom" center channel since my speaker would block the TV. I was concerned that sliding the TV too far off center might create too much weight on one side, but I guess the mount will still be able to support the load.
 
-Jim-

-Jim-

Senior Audioholic
Nobody, ever, has said, "dang, I wish I had bought a smaller TV!".
Wrong! Some years ago my wife decided she wanted a TV in the bedroom, so off we went looking. After looking around a bit, she decided we should buy a 55 inch Samsung LED - which shocked me at the time. After about 2 weeks she came to the conclusion that it was just too large and wanted to get something smaller. (I don't watch TV in the bedroom.) So after a while (I forget how long but not more than a month or so) I saw a deal on a 48 inch Samsung LED, and after she auditioned it in the store for quite a while, I bought it.

(I moved that 55 inch Samsung LED to the Games Room downstairs, bumping an older 55 inch Toshiba LED into the Man Cave / Basement Junk room.)

Two months ago we bought a 75" 2021 Samsung QN85A Neo 4K Smart QLED TV as the Toshiba finally died, which bumped the 55 inch Samsung to the Man Cave. I went to QLED over OLED as the Games Room has a wall of windows which my wife likes to let the sunshine in during daylight hours. She also likes the lights up bright at night. So brightness was the overriding factor, along with our youngest son is a gamer, and I'd heard stories about burn-in for OLED.

The 75" Samsung QLED TV has been amazing, and we are totally satisfied with our purchase. It probably helps we are not into a darken theater style approach, even though this room has our Atmos setup. OLED probably could have worked if we closed the shutters from the summer sun beaming in. But that doesn't happen when my misses is in the room.

As they say...Happy Wife => Happy Life!
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Wrong! Some years ago my wife decided she wanted a TV in the bedroom, so off we went looking. After looking around a bit, she decided we should buy a 55 inch Samsung LED - which shocked me at the time. After about 2 weeks she came to the conclusion that it was just too large and wanted to get something smaller. (I don't watch TV in the bedroom.) So after a while (I forget how long but not more than a month or so) I saw a deal on a 48 inch Samsung LED, and after she auditioned it in the store for quite a while, I bought it.

(I moved that 55 inch Samsung LED to the Games Room downstairs, bumping an older 55 inch Toshiba LED into the Man Cave / Basement Junk room.)

Two months ago we bought a 75" 2021 Samsung QN85A Neo 4K Smart QLED TV as the Toshiba finally died, which bumped the 55 inch Samsung to the Man Cave. I went to QLED over OLED as the Games Room has a wall of windows which my wife likes to let the sunshine in during daylight hours. She also likes the lights up bright at night. So brightness was the overriding factor, along with our youngest son is a gamer, and I'd heard stories about burn-in for OLED.

The 75" Samsung QLED TV has been amazing, and we are totally satisfied with our purchase. It probably helps we are not into a darken theater style approach, even though this room has our Atmos setup. OLED probably could have worked if we closed the shutters from the summer sun beaming in. But that doesn't happen when my misses is in the room.

As they say...Happy Wife => Happy Life!
I still don't understand why people say the OLED won't be bright enough in a well lit room?

My 65" is in a room with 5 windows, no curtains. I did need to bump up the brightness to a fairly high level, but I have absolutely no problems with TV brightness vs. my room brightness. I'm in the deep south where our summers are always hot and sunny.
 
T

TechToys2

Audioholic
I still don't understand why people say the OLED won't be bright enough in a well lit room?

My 65" is in a room with 5 windows, no curtains. I did need to bump up the brightness to a fairly high level, but I have absolutely no problems with TV brightness vs. my room brightness. I'm in the deep south where our summers are always hot and sunny.
From what I have read (and have no personal experience), the issue is really only relevant, if at all, if typically watching HDR in a very bright room. I see the numbers but don't really know what they mean in practical terms. Not a big fan of Sound & Vision, but I found this anecdotally interesting.

www.soundandvision.com

Can I Use an OLED TV for Bright Room Viewing?
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com Q My house has a well-lit living room where I watch TV. Are OLED sets bright enough to use in that space, or should I buy an LCD TV instead? —Paul G. A Before I respond to that question, let me first provide some background...
www.soundandvision.com
www.soundandvision.com

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panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
I still don't understand why people say the OLED won't be bright enough in a well lit room?

My 65" is in a room with 5 windows, no curtains. I did need to bump up the brightness to a fairly high level, but I have absolutely no problems with TV brightness vs. my room brightness. I'm in the deep south where our summers are always hot and sunny.
I have a lot of windows in my room too and have zero issues with brightness. I was concerned about it until I unboxed it and turned it on. Non issue.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
From what I have read (and have no personal experience), the issue is really only relevant, if at all, if typically watching HDR in a very bright room. I see the numbers but don't really know what they mean in practical terms. Not a big fan of Sound & Vision, but I found this anecdotally interesting.

www.soundandvision.com

Can I Use an OLED TV for Bright Room Viewing?
Got a tech question for Sound & Vision? Email us at AskSandV@gmail.com Q My house has a well-lit living room where I watch TV. Are OLED sets bright enough to use in that space, or should I buy an LCD TV instead? —Paul G. A Before I respond to that question, let me first provide some background...
www.soundandvision.com
www.soundandvision.com

Reply
Report Edit Delete
That makes a lot more sense now, and thanks for that link!

So, I rarely watch 4K/HDR movies during the daytime, so this "limitation" is pretty much non-existent for me and for my use cases.

In general, this statement likely sums up the real world differences:
What are the real-word effects of this difference? Very little, it would seem
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
You can't use cardboard or anything else. You actually have to put it up and watch TV on it. This is a fallacy of human perception. Thinking you can throw some measurements up and know how your eye is going to work. You just can't.

In time after time after time after time, the number one complaint people have after buying a TV is that they wish they had gotten the next size larger.

I've convinced clients for years to get a bigger TV than they wanted to buy, and often I'm not selling them the TV in the first place. So, no profit for me on the TV sale. The goal is to get the right size for the viewing distance. At 9', you can easily support a 75" display. It takes a few hours of viewing before you wondered why you worried about it being too large at all. I've had weekend installations where people have thanked me before I left for insisting they purchase much larger than they had planned for. I have NEVER had someone wish they had moved to a smaller size ever.
I went with the 75" and a year later I think I need to move up to an 85". Looking at them in person, I thought "I don't need the 85." It seems "normal" to me until I go to other people's homes and see their 55" TVs.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
I went with the 75" and a year later I think I need to move up to an 85". Looking at them in person, I thought "I don't need the 85." It seems "normal" to me until I go to other people's homes and see their 55" TVs.
It seems "normal" to me until I go to other people's homes and see squint at their 55" TVs.
 
Auditor55

Auditor55

Audioholic General
RIGHT!

Nobody, ever, has said, "dang, I wish I had bought a smaller TV!".

Unless the TV is physically not able to fit into your space, it is not possible to buy too big. Buy the biggest TV that you can afford and that will fit in your space!

As far as OLED vs. brightness, I really just don't understand. I have a 65" OLED in a well lit room with 5 windows. I did have to bump up the brightness quite a bit, but it is plenty bright to me, and isn't washed out like some previous techs would be at high brightness settings.
Bumping up the brightness on an OLED typically isn't a good idea, due to burn-in issues and image retention, unless you have one of the new Sony's with the coolant, be careful with bumping up the brightness.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Bumping up the brightness on an OLED typically isn't a good idea, due to burn-in issues and image retention, unless you have one of the new Sony's with the coolant, be careful with bumping up the brightness.
Bollocks!
 
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