Key to Finding New Generation of Audio Enthusiasts

lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
I like golf and its complexity and the long lead time to get good at it. It is never boring and success varies widely within the same week which is what keeps my interest. I also like AV gear and home theaters and the journey that goes into understanding how to setup and enjoy my hard work.
Do you think it's a good avenue to get younger listeners involved with audio gear, though? Figured you already liked the audio stuff....
 
G

Golfx

Full Audioholic
Seemed appropriate to comment on your negative view of golf
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
Seemed appropriate to comment on your negative view of golf
Ok, but mine was more in the context of young people doing the golf/country club thing. Curious, how many young people you see golfing these days?
 
ryanosaur

ryanosaur

Audioholic Warlord
Ok, but mine was more in the context of young people doing the golf/country club thing. Curious, how many young people you see golfing these days?
When I was golfing, plenty. But that wasn't at exclusive clubs. ;) We're talking public or municipal courses.

When I "caddied" (a long time ago), you rarely saw anybody that wasn't 40+, unless it was their kids. That was a private club in PGA Tour rotation.

Back to the original point that I recall being made, though...
An exclusive golf club is a sh!t location to try to leverage interest in the Hi Fi Hobby! :cool:
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
When I was golfing, plenty. But that wasn't at exclusive clubs. ;) We're talking public or municipal courses.

When I "caddied" (a long time ago), you rarely saw anybody that wasn't 40+, unless it was their kids. That was a private club in PGA Tour rotation.

Back to the original point that I recall being made, though...
An exclusive golf club is a sh!t location to try to leverage interest in the Hi Fi Hobby! :cool:
Yeah I've seen younger folk when I've played on the public/cheap courses (I've played now and then over the years to hang with friends and see if my opinion changed)....but still I remember most golfers were more on the older side....but still don't see it as an avenue to audio stuff.
 
G

Golfx

Full Audioholic
Golf is undergoing a very large renaissance because it was one of the safest past times to acquire during the Covid crisis. It was and is a safe outside activity during an airborne virus pandemic. Clubs are now busier than ever and private clubs have waiting lists to join. Similarly before the supply chain chip crisis Crutchfield was busier than even their Xmas season.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
What's the age breakdown, tho? Yeah my passion, cycling, exploded during covid, too, but think it was a wide variety of ages otoh. While I don't encourage listening to but your surroundings while cycling, always did like wrenching to good tunes.....but have no idea how you might get cyclists more involved with audio.
Golf is undergoing a very large renaissance because it was one of the safest past times to acquire during the Covid crisis. It was and is a safe outside activity during an airborne virus pandemic. Clubs are now busier than ever and private clubs have waiting lists to join. Similarly before the supply chain chip crisis Crutchfield was busier than even their Xmas season.
 
G

Golfx

Full Audioholic
The original reference to golf was from the magazine article which connected marketing of expensive cars to those people likely to afford them. Several following posts were then talking about how to attract younger people to our hobby. The next reference to golf was your dismissive negative statement that seemed unnecessary to the point of the forum. Many of the new golfers are younger men and their families in their 30s. Private clubs reduce their monthly dues and intitiation fees to attract younger golfers families along with new recreation facilities like swimming complexes, tennis complexes, fitness centers and restaurants with children‘s menus.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
The original reference to golf was from the magazine article which connected marketing of expensive cars to those people likely to afford them. Several following posts were then talking about how to attract younger people to our hobby. The next reference to golf was your dismissive negative statement that seemed unnecessary to the point of the forum. Many of the new golfers are younger men and their families in their 30s. Private clubs reduce their monthly dues and intitiation fees to attract younger golfers families along with new recreation facilities like swimming complexes, tennis complexes, fitness centers and restaurants with children‘s menus.
LOL just noticed your screen name....sorry for stepping on sensitive toes. Private clubs reduce fees/dues how much? What are they to begin with?
 
G

Golfx

Full Audioholic
It is a adjusted by age. Those under 35 pay about half of dues and fees. At 35 they pay full member dues and fees. This gets reversed at 75 to half again. Each club has their own fees and dues. Kids and grandkids are very prevalent at private clubs. Each club also offers summer camps and lessons for golf, tennis and swimming. The private clubs also let high school and college golf teams free access to practice and course facilities. All designed to grow the future of clubs. We need some formal programs offered in an organized fashion similar to those growth attempts.
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
It is a adjusted by age. Those under 35 pay about half of dues and fees. At 35 they pay full member dues and fees. This gets reversed at 75 to half again. Each club has their own fees and dues. Kids and grandkids are very prevalent at private clubs. Each club also offers summer camps and lessons for golf, tennis and swimming. The private clubs also let high school and college golf teams free access to practice and course facilities. All designed to grow the future of clubs. We need some formal programs offered in an organized fashion similar to those growth attempts.
Yeah sounds like grandpa's cc world (he was president of several, started one too). Hanging out with the kids a lot we were mostly bored and wanted to be elsewhere. The go-kart track not far away was very popular with us, but not the older folk :)
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
Let's go back to the topic of this thread.

One of the main problems with getting the new generation to become interested in good audio, is the fact that most of this population uses streaming as the main source of music. So most of them don't need expensive receivers or amplifiers, CD players or turntables. They listen to those streamed files and also compressed poor quality mp3 on cheap ear or headphones. They don't even know how good quality audio sounds like, because they never went to a concert hall to hear real acoustic instruments.

Unfortunately, I think that the high fidelity market will shrink in the next decade or so. And possibly CD and Blu-ray manufacturers will have to reduce production to some extent, if they haven't started already, because of reduced demand.

What I have been thinking of which might be wacky or worth trying is as follows:

I would see the possibility of a joint venture between a car dealer and a Hi-Fi shop annexed to the dealership building. All of the generations buy cars, and any incentive to suggest some car buyer to visit the attached audio shop might bring business. The sales person would have to be very knowledgeable about the products for sale. The price of popular brand products would have to be decent and the store would not have to stock a large inventory.
 
D

Danzilla31

Audioholic Spartan
*sighs

Here we go, back to the elitist approach to bemoaning the dying HiFi Hobby and marketplace. What, Jerry? No McMansions as part of this trip? Guess it's just another dumpster fire of an op-ed, in that regard.

If the goal is to be more accessible, why do you keep leaning on exclusive concepts of marketing that really only serve to the priveledged, to the "Haves," the upper class? Are you suggesting that a mid-5-figure income isn't worthy of the audio hobby?

If not... you need to work on your messaging, cause once again, it certainly sounds that way. And #hint: this type of attitude is a big part of the problem you are bemoaning.

View attachment 56504
I couldn't help but chuckle and think of your post when I looked at the picture on the front of this article. It shows a bunch of dudes on a golf course I believe and flanked to either side? Are the monolith Encore T6 towers that cost 375 each right now. The irony in that photo between the two extremes was funny
 
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Golfx

Full Audioholic
There isn’t a single source for leadership to recruit new audio enthusiasts. Perhaps industry at large could form a recruitment committee made up and resourced by a combination of media, large online dealers, music sources, CODEC licensers, equipment manufacturers with one simple driving goal of recruiting new souls. Initiatives could be simple jargon free beginners guides—written and YouTube. With edited agreed upon beginners guides all saying the same thing our hobby may be less intimidating. Advertising initiatives to the young crowd about the sound advantage of using better equipment. Short pertinent spots on “the” current social media of choice. Again, an organized inclusive leadership source could leverage different perspectives and potential income streams. We don’t have that now. We seem driven by Dolby and then resulting new AV toys and music to sell. Why not organize “all” of it to just simply recruit new audio enthusiasts and then it may create a high tide that will lift all boats.
 
J

jeffca

Junior Audioholic
Dude, I think you are tripping... and not in a good way.

If you are thinking that the industry is going to start making equipment that costs around $10K per unit and get young enthusiasts to buy it, you have lost your mind.

Some of the best audio gear on the planet is quite reasonably priced. That is what the audio press should be promoting... high ROI equipment rather stuff that costs a lot.
 
Teetertotter?

Teetertotter?

Full Audioholic
AV equipment is a luxury item and can the middle class afford these days?? Then you have the wires to hide or contend with in a NORMAL home/apartment. Speakers to be mounted or not or find best positioning...etc. So called, Hi-FI stores, are the thing of the past. Best Buy sells what the consumer wants most....TV's....Laptops,,,,,etc. Then as someone mentioned, is there a rep that knows anything or try and find one. lol The AV market has not been a huge market for years. What is HT to the public today, as a whole?

When Staz came out in the early 90's with DD, that is when I purchased my first AVR and 4 speakers.....WOW...Big time. Rear speaker wiring was routed via basement joists and up through the rear stud wall. The speakers were from Radio Shack and the AVR from a local Hi-Fi/Communications store. I can't remember where I read about a HT set-up.

Anyway, There is probably only 3% of the Adult population interested in HT. Big TV and sound bar these days. Low Budget. My wife can care less with my basement HT set-up. As long as she has her 55" with no sound bar.......she is happy in the living room. lol We are now in our 3rd smaller ranch home, retired , since 2008.
 
H

HackMan55

Enthusiast
I believe the two biggest barriers to young people being introduced to home audio are money and exposure. I'm not sure many people, regardless of age, know just how much better their sound can be.

I didn't get into it until later in life, when I was about forty. Other than a few friends who were into car audio, I never knew anyone who put much time or effort into audio and had never been exposed to any quality systems. I was content with a sound bar, blissfully ignorant of what I was missing out on.

After I got a job installing satellite, I was working at an install for some rich old farmer. He was more than happy showing off his home theater room and his sound system blew me away. I had never seen or heard anything like it. That night I set about learning what I could to improve the audio in my home.

Now I knew I wouldn't be able to have the same quality set up he had with his expensive and custom gear. But I knew I'd at least be able to make a significant improvement on what I did have.

My employer gave us bonus points for various things that could be used towards different products and services. I had accrued plenty with no real idea of what to use them on. I used them to get all my initial gear, methodically building a 5.1 system. It wasn't (and isn't) high quality stuff but was still a huge improvement over that sound bar. Not only that, but I really enjoyed learning about it. Not knowing anyone I could ask questions to and not being around actual sound systems was a hindrance, but reading and researching and looking around for deals is still a blast.

If I hadn't been routed that job at that guys house, I'd probably have never known what I was missing. And if I didn't have those award points to get my initial gear, I'd have probably gotten overwhelmed by the cost of putting a decent system together.

I've added a few things here and there to that original 5.1 set up (currently running 9.2) but for the most part am still using the same stuff. My home theater system sucks compared to 99% of the people in these forums (why I rarely post, lol)....but is better than 99% of the people I meet in real life. That, along with the fun of learning about it and putting it together, makes it worth the time, attention, and cost the hobby requires.

Sorry for turning a post into a novel.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
I believe the two biggest barriers to young people being introduced to home audio are money and exposure. I'm not sure many people, regardless of age, know just how much better their sound can be.

I didn't get into it until later in life, when I was about forty. Other than a few friends who were into car audio, I never knew anyone who put much time or effort into audio and had never been exposed to any quality systems. I was content with a sound bar, blissfully ignorant of what I was missing out on.

After I got a job installing satellite, I was working at an install for some rich old farmer. He was more than happy showing off his home theater room and his sound system blew me away. I had never seen or heard anything like it. That night I set about learning what I could to improve the audio in my home.

Now I knew I wouldn't be able to have the same quality set up he had with his expensive and custom gear. But I knew I'd at least be able to make a significant improvement on what I did have.

My employer gave us bonus points for various things that could be used towards different products and services. I had accrued plenty with no real idea of what to use them on. I used them to get all my initial gear, methodically building a 5.1 system. It wasn't (and isn't) high quality stuff but was still a huge improvement over that sound bar. Not only that, but I really enjoyed learning about it. Not knowing anyone I could ask questions to and not being around actual sound systems was a hindrance, but reading and researching and looking around for deals is still a blast.

If I hadn't been routed that job at that guys house, I'd probably have never known what I was missing. And if I didn't have those award points to get my initial gear, I'd have probably gotten overwhelmed by the cost of putting a decent system together.

I've added a few things here and there to that original 5.1 set up (currently running 9.2) but for the most part am still using the same stuff. My home theater system sucks compared to 99% of the people in these forums (why I rarely post, lol)....but is better than 99% of the people I meet in real life. That, along with the fun of learning about it and putting it together, makes it worth the time, attention, and cost the hobby requires.

Sorry for turning a post into a novel.
Yes, you put the nail on some of the main reasons, exposure and money. In my post No. 32 above, my idea of a joint venture between a car dealer and a specialized Hi-Fi and AV equipment store, was to allow exposition to good audio reproduction, since most of the new generations don't even know how can a good Hi-Fi or home theater system system perform, but they buy cars. Most of them have not even assisted to a live acoustic concert. That's quite different from listening to compressed mp3 sound tracks and so on.

As you surely know, for a store to be successful in business, it has to be well located in a community or a city. Exposition is of prime importance. It's unfortunate and the risk that high fidelity sound reproduction at home disappear with the years really exists.
 
J

jaananhi464

Audiophyte
Cell phones are the biggest factor for sure. Also, content as some have said. Remember one of the reasons I felt compelled to buy my first system in the 70s was so I could clearly hear the singers voice and lyrics. Still feel the same way but modern popular music's creativity does not seem to provide that hook as in the past.
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