GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Fiona slams Canada's Atlantic coast


We personally got off pretty lucky. Power went out last night - briefly - a couple of times, but has been on since we got up this morning. However, about 80% of the province is without power.

I spent a couple of hours cleaning up branches and leaves and I'm happy to say that we don't have any real damage. I'll need to wash the vehicles and the house windows tomorrow, as they're plastered with leaves.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Fiona slams Canada's Atlantic coast


We personally got off pretty lucky. Power went out last night - briefly - a couple of times, but has been on since we got up this morning. However, about 80% of the province is without power.

I spent a couple of hours cleaning up branches and leaves and I'm happy to say that we don't have any real damage. I'll need to wash the vehicles and the house windows tomorrow, as they're plastered with leaves.
I assume you have power. According to our news reports 500,000 in the Maritimes lost power. I think you can count yourself lucky. It is worrying that storm could maintain that strength that far North. Not a good omen.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Seriously, I have no life.
Maybe it'll go over the pole and hit Moscow or St. Pete? ;) :D
One can hope. It is free to hope. :D:D
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
I assume you have power. According to our news reports 500,000 in the Maritimes lost power. I think you can count yourself lucky. It is worrying that storm could maintain that strength that far North. Not a good omen.
Yes, we're very fortunate. We have friends who don't have power here for supper. They were delicious....
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Fiona slams Canada's Atlantic coast


We personally got off pretty lucky. Power went out last night - briefly - a couple of times, but has been on since we got up this morning. However, about 80% of the province is without power.

I spent a couple of hours cleaning up branches and leaves and I'm happy to say that we don't have any real damage. I'll need to wash the vehicles and the house windows tomorrow, as they're plastered with leaves.
Glad to hear you made it through without any major problems. From what I saw the storm was a beast
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Power crews have come up from Maine to help with power restoration. Much appreciated.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Yes, we're very fortunate. We have friends who don't have power here for supper. They were delicious....
There were pictures of Port Aux Basques on our TV news this evening. I recognized it right away, as that was our first port of call on the Ferry over. It looked a mess, with houses blown down and floating out to sea. A shame it is a beautiful place. They seldom pull the ferries, but I bet they did today. On our return trip we had Beaufort 7, which is near gale. The ship rode it very well though.

So sorry this happened, the Maritimes are just beautiful and I hope the damage is not too extensive. I find it very hard to believe this happened this far North.

Dramatic footage from Port Aux Basques.


I see it is now a post tropical cyclone and moving North East at about 7 knots. It looks as if it will pass over the northwest peninsular of Newfoundland. Then I expect it will follow the trade winds as they blow to the West. This is the current Northern jet stream.



It is rare for a Hurricane to get to the UK and Europe, but they do arrive as a tropical depression at times. It happened in 1968. It was a Sunday evening and raining hard. I had to get back from Medway to my apartment in South London at Catford. The rain was really coming down. I was in my 1948 Alvis TA 21 sports saloon. It only had seven and a half inch ground clearance, and there was standing water in parts of the South Circular road. By the time I got home, the rear carpets were soaked. The brakes were drum and I did not have a lot of breaking as the drums and shoes were soaked. That car was well before disc brakes! However the engine did not miss a beat.

Sorry mitrycrafts this storm is not going to Moscow.
 
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GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
There were pictures of Port Aux Basques on our TV news this evening. I recognized it right away, as that was our first port of call on the Ferry over. It looked a mess, with houses blown down and floating out to sea. A shame it is a beautiful place. They seldom pull the ferries, but I bet they did today. On our return trip we had Beaufort 7, which is near gale. The ship rode it very well though.

So sorry this happened, the Maritimes are just beautiful and I hope the damage is not too extensive. I find it very hard to believe this happened this far North.

Dramatic footage from Port Aux Basques.


I see it is now a post tropical cyclone and moving North East at about 7 knots. It looks as if it will pass over the northwest peninsular of Newfoundland. Then I expect it will follow the trade winds as they blow to the West. This is the current Northern jet stream.



It is rare for a Hurricane to get to the UK and Europe, but they do arrive as a tropical depression at times. It happened in 1968. It was a Sunday evening and raining hard. I had to get back from Medway to my apartment in South London at Catford. The rain was really coming down. I was in my 1948 Alvis TA 21 sports saloon. It only had seven and a half inch ground clearance, and there was standing water in parts of the South Circular road. By the time I got home, the rear carpets were soaked. The brakes were drum and I did not have a lot of breaking as the drums and shoes were soaked. That car was well before disc brakes! However the engine did not miss a beat.

Sorry mitrycrafts this storm is not going to Moscow.
Yes, Port Aux Basques was hit pretty hard. And no, the ferries certainly would not be running. Since the storm made landfall about 200 kms east of where I live, the storm surge was pushing out to sea, which minimized shoreline damage here. However, Port Aux Basques is situated east of the storm centre, so they were hit by a hard onshore storm surge, due to the counterclockwise storm rotation.

I really don't understand how my neighbourhood got off so easy. My house is surrounded by 60 foot maple and oak trees, and I was concerned one or more would come down on us. But, that didn't happen. Meanwhile, other areas of the Halifax region have many large trees and utility poles down. They've made some progress with power restoration, but half of the province is still without power.
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Samurai
Our daughter is in Halifax across from the Halifax Shipyard, so she is sheltered between the hillside and Irving Shipbuilding. Power was out only for an hour or so. Internet was out for a few hours but up again the next day. Cape Breton (north eastern island) was nailed pretty hard due to the direction the storm was rotating in, including Glace Bay. We were there just last year around this same time... best donair pizza around at Alexandra's. Hope they survived ok.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
I drove to work yesterday morning in a torrential downpour w/thunder and lightening, only to find that our building had no power. Turned around and headed home through what was - at that point - a river and worked from home. Almost 30% of the province is still without power this morning. The weather really didn't help power restoration. The final repair/clean-up bill is going to be big.
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
Ian looks to be headed that way too. It seems like it will hit Florida today and the models indicate it won't go out to sea, it will follow the seaboard.
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Samurai
I drove to work yesterday morning in a torrential downpour w/thunder and lightening, only to find that our building had no power. Turned around and headed home through what was - at that point - a river and worked from home. Almost 30% of the province is still without power this morning. The weather really didn't help power restoration. The final repair/clean-up bill is going to be big.
The number of downed trees on hydro lines is staggering. That they have managed to restore as much power as they have is impressive.

We have a friend with a cottage on Margarets Bay but they didn't suffer any major damage. If you're familiar with the area, it's on Boutilier Cove, up Boutilier Cove Rd from The Finer Diner (on Peggys Cove Rd). They are fortunate in that the shore line faces SW so the wind was coming from inland. They have several very tall evergreen trees along the shore line but none were blown over. There is a 10m cliff to the water so storm surge was not a concern but erosion of the cliff face is an issue. Have not heard yet about the many boat docks along the shore. I imagine a few of those may have been swept away.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
The number of downed trees on hydro lines is staggering. That they have managed to restore as much power as they have is impressive.

We have a friend with a cottage on Margarets Bay but they didn't suffer any major damage. If you're familiar with the area, it's on Boutilier Cove, up Boutilier Cove Rd from The Finer Diner (on Peggys Cove Rd). They are fortunate in that the shore line faces SW so the wind was coming from inland. They have several very tall evergreen trees along the shore line but none were blown over. There is a 10m cliff to the water so storm surge was not a concern but erosion of the cliff face is an issue. Have not heard yet about the many boat docks along the shore. I imagine a few of those may have been swept away.
Yep, I know the area. I haven't heard about damage to docks along that shore, but the wind direction helped. The shore along the Northumberland Strait, on the other hand, suffered significantly.
 

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