How to connect microphone to DENON Receiver?

N

Nestorsh

Junior Audioholic
Just like the title says, I have a DENON AVR-S950H, which doesnt have a microphone input, my wife wants a microphone with a XLR plug, is there any way to connect it to the receiver?
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Just like the title says, I have a DENON AVR-S950H, which doesnt have a microphone input, my wife wants a microphone with a XLR plug, is there any way to connect it to the receiver?
Yes, but you need a microphone mixer. The mic is Low Z and receiver inputs are all High Z. So you connect the mic to a mixer with XLR inputs and then you connect the audio out to an analog input on your receiver.
 
N

Nestorsh

Junior Audioholic
Yes, but you need a microphone mixer. The mic is Low Z and receiver inputs are all High Z. So you connect the mic to a mixer with XLR inputs and then you connect the audio out to an analog input on your receiver.
Low/high Z? Any cheap recommendations for a mixer? Also what phantom power means, I asked to a guitar center guy (and I explained I didn’t know anything about microphones) but he was an asshole about it, he said the phantom power would blow my receiver, he also said I should replace my receiver cuz he haven’t heard about DENON since he was in 8 grade (and he wasn’t that old) lol
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Low/high Z? Any cheap recommendations for a mixer? Also what phantom power means, I asked to a guitar center guy (and I explained I didn’t know anything about microphones) but he was an asshole about it, he said the phantom power would blow my receiver, he also said I should replace my receiver cuz he haven’t heard about DENON since he was in 8 grade (and he wasn’t that old) lol
Now I need to know the make, spec. and model number of your mic.

Microphones come in three types basically. Moving coil mics which need no power supply. Condenser mics that have a battery to power them. Then there are condenser mics that require 48 volt phantom powering.

Now XLR is known as a balanced connection, with the output of the mic swinging above and below the neutral line. There is also a ground lead. So there are three wires, live, neutral and ground wires. The signal is carried on the live and neutral. Now phantom powering is an ingenious system. The mixer puts 48 volts above ground on the live AND neutral leads. So the live and neutral leads are at equal potential above ground. That means that no current can flow through the output circuitry of the microphone. However current is drawn equally from the live and neutral leads to power the amp in the microphone, the ground being the return connection.

If you have a mic that needs phantom powering that will make it a much more expensive endeavor.
 
N

Nestorsh

Junior Audioholic
Good thing is I don’t have a microphone yet, but I’ll keep away from those with phantom power required, also, would I be able to consider a USB microphone?
 
lovinthehd

lovinthehd

Audioholic Jedi
What is your wife wanting to do with a mic into the avr? AVRs aren't really the tool for that job generally.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Singing and play guitar,
The trouble with that is you are going to need more than one mic. Live music like that has a wide dynamic range and it is likely your receiver does not have the head room for that application. A lot of mixers don't either. I suspect your speakers are not designed for that application either.

Musicians gear is designed to a different set of specs. with the words designed to be robust for hard usage at the forefront. If she has a soft voice and plays the guitar softly you will probably get away with it. You must remember that this is not a usual application for a home rig and not something they are designed for.

One mistake and a sudden dose of feedback and you will have a blown tweeter or worse.

Since you are clearly not experienced I'm going to strongly advise you against this course of action.
 
J

jlanojr1975

Audiophyte
Hi,
I have a DENON 650H which doesn't have available for External Microphone. I have Digital to analog converter (Optical to Coaxial or Coaxial to Optical Digital Audio Converter with Volume Control, Bi-Directional Digital to Analog Converter Adapter with 3.5mm Audio RCA R/L Port for Blu-ray Player,PS5/4,Speaker) and a external microphone (Fifine UHF Dual Channel Wireless Handheld Microphone, Easy-to-use Karaoke Wireless Microphone System-K036) How can I make it work. I want to used YouTube as my source for karaoke
I really appreciate any advise i can get

Thank you,
Jaime L
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Singing and play guitar,
I agree with TLS- it would be better from the standpoint of signal compatibility and speaker lifespan if you get a powered speaker that's used for performance. There are many levels WRT power/input/quality that are available and they're suited for the signal from mics & instruments. If you were to connect a guitar or mic directly to an AVR, even coming through a mixer, one of the first things you would notice is how string the bass is and how little is sounds the way you had expected. HiFi and instrument sound are two very different things.

Where are you located?
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Hi,
I have a DENON 650H which doesn't have available for External Microphone. I have Digital to analog converter (Optical to Coaxial or Coaxial to Optical Digital Audio Converter with Volume Control, Bi-Directional Digital to Analog Converter Adapter with 3.5mm Audio RCA R/L Port for Blu-ray Player,PS5/4,Speaker) and a external microphone (Fifine UHF Dual Channel Wireless Handheld Microphone, Easy-to-use Karaoke Wireless Microphone System-K036) How can I make it work. I want to used YouTube as my source for karaoke
I really appreciate any advise i can get

Thank you,
Jaime L
One thing receivers are NOT, are karaoke machines.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
One thing receivers are NOT, are karaoke machines.
No, but a karaoke machine can be connected and if it's not cranked too loudly, it works OK. Not great, but it works.
 
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