Gaming Setup for Xbox One X/Samsung Q80R/Denon AVRX4400H?

M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
I just set up a new Samsung Q80 and Denon AVRX4400H with an Xbox One X. I ran an HDMI from the Xbox to the Gaming HDMI port on the Denon, and the HDMI ARC port on the Denon is connected to the HDMI ARC port on the TV (right now I have HDMI lines from the satellite box, Xbox, and Blu Ray player connected to HDMI input ports on the Denon, and one HDMI line from the Denon output port to the TV).

It seems to be working fine based on a few minutes of playing Titanfall last night after getting everything set up. However, I'm wondering if this setup might be introducing video lag because the video signal is going through the Denon? Would it be better to run an HDMI line directly from the Xbox to an HDMI input on the TV, then run a digital audio cable from the Xbox to the Denon? Can I skip the digital audio cable and rely on the HDMI ARC from the TV to the Denon for surround sound while gaming?

Is there a better way to do this?

I have not detected any lag so far, but I'd just as soon eliminate potential sources of lag to the extent possible.
 
everettT

everettT

Audioholic Ninja
I just set up a new Samsung Q80 and Denon AVRX4400H with an Xbox One X. I ran an HDMI from the Xbox to the Gaming HDMI port on the Denon, and the HDMI ARC port on the Denon is connected to the HDMI ARC port on the TV (right now I have HDMI lines from the satellite box, Xbox, and Blu Ray player connected to HDMI input ports on the Denon, and one HDMI line from the Denon output port to the TV).

It seems to be working fine based on a few minutes of playing Titanfall last night after getting everything set up. However, I'm wondering if this setup might be introducing video lag because the video signal is going through the Denon? Would it be better to run an HDMI line directly from the Xbox to an HDMI input on the TV, then run a digital audio cable from the Xbox to the Denon? Can I skip the digital audio cable and rely on the HDMI ARC from the TV to the Denon for surround sound while gaming?

Is there a better way to do this?

I have not detected any lag so far, but I'd just as soon eliminate potential sources of lag to the extent possible.
You answered it. No issue.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
I just set up a new Samsung Q80 and Denon AVRX4400H with an Xbox One X. I ran an HDMI from the Xbox to the Gaming HDMI port on the Denon, and the HDMI ARC port on the Denon is connected to the HDMI ARC port on the TV (right now I have HDMI lines from the satellite box, Xbox, and Blu Ray player connected to HDMI input ports on the Denon, and one HDMI line from the Denon output port to the TV).

It seems to be working fine based on a few minutes of playing Titanfall last night after getting everything set up. However, I'm wondering if this setup might be introducing video lag because the video signal is going through the Denon? Would it be better to run an HDMI line directly from the Xbox to an HDMI input on the TV, then run a digital audio cable from the Xbox to the Denon? Can I skip the digital audio cable and rely on the HDMI ARC from the TV to the Denon for surround sound while gaming?

Is there a better way to do this?

I have not detected any lag so far, but I'd just as soon eliminate potential sources of lag to the extent possible.
Be sure the Denon is not doing any video processing, be sure the TV is set to "game mode" (i.e. no video processing).
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Thanks for the responses. It works fine for gaming. As far as I can tell, the only disadvantage with the current setup is that the TV does not automatically switch to game mode unless an HDMI line runs directly from the Xbox to the TV.
 
T

tefeviil

Audiophyte
Sorry for disturbing an old thread, but I’ve been thinking about installing the same setup on a gaming table. Is a good idea? The thing is that I don’t have any proper place to install the TV, the Xbox, and the receiver. And the only piece of furniture that might be a fit is the old gaming table. I got a new one from eurekaergonomic.com recently and didn’t need this old one anymore.
It has two under-desk shelves that might work well for the Xbox and the receiver. Is it safe to place these electrical appliances into small spaces inside the table? Is it able to cause overheating?
I would be grateful for any responses and advice
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Sorry for disturbing an old thread, but I’ve been thinking about installing the same setup on a gaming table. Is a good idea? The thing is that I don’t have any proper place to install the TV, the Xbox, and the receiver. And the only piece of furniture that might be a fit is the old gaming table. I got a new one from eurekaergonomic.com recently and didn’t need this old one anymore.
It has two under-desk shelves that might work well for the Xbox and the receiver. Is it safe to place these electrical appliances into small spaces inside the table? Is it able to cause overheating?
I would be grateful for any responses and advice
It's hard to say for sure without knowing more about your old gaming table and what receiver you have.

I have three Denon AVRs and they all throw a lot of heat. To make a long story short, in 2 of my systems I had issues with Blu Ray players overheating when placed above the AVRs until I cut holes in a cabinet for ventilation (one system) and moved the Blu Ray player up on a wood stand (home made) to provide air circulation in the other system.

The system with the AVRX4400H/xBox/Blu Ray player has not had overheating issues, but it's in a "professional" rack with quite a bit of space for air flow.

I'm not sure how much space there is in your gaming table, but you might want to think about giving the existing shelves the old Swiss cheese treatment (cut holes in them) or build new shelves with more space for air circulation.

Another thing to think about is that higher temperatures will tend to shorten the lifespan of electronics even if they don't actually overheat and shut down. Here's an example for electrolytic capacitors:

1669776388383.png



If you've ever wondered why LED lights that supposedly have 10 year lifespans fail after 2-3 years, this is it right here. In reality they get hot and cook the driver circuit way before 10 years.
 
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