Epson 31000 Reflective 3LCD Projector First Look

A

admin

Audioholics Robot
Staff member
We got to see a new 3LCD technology today first hand, which Epson America is dubbing "Reflective 3LCD". The technology basically involves sending light through an LCD panel which then bounces off a mirror, passing through the panel twice. There are to advantages using this method. First, since the light isn't passing through the panel once and then moving on, there is less bleed, leading to a darker image when blacks are present in the signal. Second, the smaller pixels can adjust more quickly, reducing the pixel lag inherent to LCD. The company announced its entry into a new home theater projector market with three 1080p 3LCD Reflective home theater projectors, the high-end PowerLite Pro Cinema 61000, the 31000 (which we saw demoed), and the Home Cinema 21000.


Discuss "Epson 31000 Reflective 3LCD Projector First Look" here. Read the article.
 
E

efzauner

Enthusiast
reflective LCD?

How does this differ from LCOS and JVC HDILA or Sony SXRD? A technical article updating us on projector technology including DLP would be cool.
 
Chopin_Guy

Chopin_Guy

Senior Audioholic
I have a question regarding one of the specs in the article -- that's regarding these new Epsons including 'two anamorphic lens' (squeeze and wide)?? How does this work exactly?? I assume it has something to due with a motorized lens memory that will allow the projector to throw a 2.35:1 or 2.4:1 image without the use of an anamorphic lens. Will there be any loss of image quality with this??

Being in the planning stages of a new media room this is particularly interesting as I wouldn't have previously considered one of the wider aspect ratio screens -- not wanting the large expense of an anamorphic lens but a projector with this capability might make this a possibility to many more people now...
 
I

InTheIndustry

Senior Audioholic
I have a question regarding one of the specs in the article -- that's regarding these new Epsons including 'two anamorphic lens' (squeeze and wide)?? How does this work exactly?? I assume it has something to due with a motorized lens memory that will allow the projector to throw a 2.35:1 or 2.4:1 image without the use of an anamorphic lens. Will there be any loss of image quality with this??

Being in the planning stages of a new media room this is particularly interesting as I wouldn't have previously considered one of the wider aspect ratio screens -- not wanting the large expense of an anamorphic lens but a projector with this capability might make this a possibility to many more people now...
In speaking with my Epson rep last week before the show, yes. I believe they are going to make the electronics fit the shape of screen you have instead of making outside hardware do the work. Similar to the Panasonic piece, only supposedly better. I will get the inside scoop from him immediately after the show.

This will make a HUGE impact on what I put in our new showroom this fall. This, to me, is more exciting and useful than 3D.
 
Chopin_Guy

Chopin_Guy

Senior Audioholic
And just be sure I'm clear on this -- the whole thing with the use of an external anamorphic lens or in this case an anamorphic mode on the projector itself -- is that you eliminate the black bars when watching a movie or other material filmed in 2.35 or 2.4:1 ratios??

I would agree with the Industry above that these are features that are much more useful and exciting than this whole 3D crazy which is still beyond me it's usefulness...
 
J

jostenmeat

Audioholic Spartan
And just be sure I'm clear on this -- the whole thing with the use of an external anamorphic lens or in this case an anamorphic mode on the projector itself -- is that you eliminate the black bars when watching a movie or other material filmed in 2.35 or 2.4:1 ratios??

I would agree with the Industry above that these are features that are much more useful and exciting than this whole 3D crazy which is still beyond me it's usefulness...
Well, sort of, depends on how one words it. There are still black bars with a 2.35 screen because 1.78 has the bars on the sides now.

Anamorphic glass is a two-part distortion. Vertical stretch processing pulls your 2.35 vertically to fit the height that the 1.78 does. Then the lens pulls it apart to stretch if back out again to fill the whole screen. One of the main benefits here is that 100% of your lumens are always used for either AR. For everyone else, whether with 1.78 or a 2.35 by way of zoom, we are wasting 25% of both of our lumens, and of our pixels too.

The best way to do this is definitely with the lens. Not a few videophiles frown upon using the zoom method, although the cost savings can be compelling. But, is a 2.35 inherently better than 1.78? Hm? I find the best attribute of a 2.35 screen is better center speaker placement or accommodation. Otherwise, with an AT screen, then even that doesn't matter anymore.

If you do the zoom method, you will have to decide which AR to calibrate for, or perhaps do double the calibrations every 200 hours. I have presented the idea of doing an in between sized calibration as a compromise between the differing ARs. Also, some people (though admittedly nutty videophiles) will say that the electronic gradations of zoom/focus can make it impossible to get it just right when going between memory presets. However, I personally wouldn't worry much about this point.
 

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