j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
Trust me, I feel the same about Biden ! ;)
I don't expect him to be. I would be surprised if any of the major leaders are experts in the things they are asked to make policy on.

and as for Mr Bean's expert status, perhaps not, but he does know a thing or two about electricity !

Being an EE and understanding EV infrastructure and process isn't the same thing. Just like acting and being a buffoon on screen aren't the same thing.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Being an EE and understanding EV infrastructure and process isn't the same thing. Just like acting and being a buffoon on screen aren't the same thing.
again, perhaps not, but it's our 'leaders' that are more or less ramming this down our throats with still many questions to be answered regarding infrastructure time lines and capability
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
again, perhaps not, but it's our 'leaders' that are more or less ramming this down our throats with still many questions to be answered regarding infrastructure time lines and capability
The "leaders" aren't cramming anything down anyone's throat. You don't need to buy an EV, simple as that. Gas isn't going anywhere in our lifetime. eFuel is viable, will keep the typical gas car going for the foreseeable future. I may buy an EV as an around town car, but I am keeping my current gas car. Once the oil companies figure out how to profit from electricity, and you know they are trying to do that right now, things will pick up. The conglomerates will follow the money.

The infrastructure for EVs will take a decade or more to show up outside of bigger cities, have common enough standards, etc... It doesn't make sense everywhere, but areas like where I live, there are enough chargers in enough places now, that it is getting there. Rural areas that aren't tourist areas will be a LONG time before it happens. "Mainstream" is a long way off. Death of the ICE car is a long way off.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I may buy an EV as an around town car, but I am keeping my current gas car.
That was my intent back when I first bought my EV. But I re-discovered some old wisdom: Drive your ICE car nearly everyday or at the very least, every other day. Otherwise, you will have battery related starting problems. If you use the EV as an everyday, around town car, saving the ICE car for longer road trips, you may encounter the same trouble. My solution was to get rid of the ICE car. (Yes, I did have jumper cables and an old 12V car battery charger. None of that really helped.)

My feeling about 'EV range anxiety' is that the sooner I adjust my thinking about charging up on road trips, the sooner I loose that range anxiety. Yes, I do live on the east coast, and yes, I tend to drive in busier areas as opposed to out in the boonies. So far, I've taken one 600 mile round trip to the north east – without problem. In a few weeks, I'll take another longer trip (700 miles round trip) to the south east, Winston-Salem, NC. I've scouted out suitable charging stops, and so far it suggests this trip will also be no problem.
 
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Trell

Trell

Audioholic Spartan
My feeling about 'EV range anxiety' is that the sooner I adjust my thinking about charging up on road trips, the sooner I loose that range anxiety. Yes, I do live on the east coast, and yes, I tend to drive in busier areas as opposed to out in the boonies. So far, I've taken one 600 mile round trip to the north east – without problem. In a few weeks, I'll take another longer trip (700 miles round trip) to the south east, Winston-Salem, NC. I've scouted out suitable charging stops, and so far it suggests this trip will also be no problem.
Charging stops like this one? :D
1686073685681.png
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
That was my intent back when I first bought my EV. But I re-discovered some old wisdom: Drive your ICE car nearly everyday or at the very least, every other day. Otherwise, you will have battery related starting problems. If you use the EV as an everyday, around town car, saving the ICE car for longer road trips, you may encounter the same trouble. My solution was to get rid of the ICE car. (Yes, I did have jumper cables and an old 12V car battery charger. None of that really helped.)

My feeling about 'EV range anxiety' is that the sooner I adjust my thinking about charging up on road trips, the sooner I loose that range anxiety. Yes, I do live on the east coast, and yes, I tend to drive in busier areas as opposed to out in the boonies. So far, I've taken one 600 mile round trip to the north east – without problem. In a few weeks, I'll take another longer trip (700 miles round trip) to the south east, Winston-Salem, NC. I've scouted out suitable charging stops, and so far it suggests this trip will also be no problem.
I have 2 ICE cars, I already only drive one about 1-2 days a week, weekend garage queen car basically. It has a AGM marine battery (all 3 cars have AGM, this one is driven the least so it gets the longest lasting one) and starts fine even if I leave it for 2 weeks, but I do still need to drive it regularly to keep it up.

Most of my driving is around town during the week, we have a ton of chargers at work, so I don't have much range anxiety in that context.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
The "leaders" aren't cramming anything down anyone's throat. You don't need to buy an EV, simple as that.
Sorry, I looked at Kalifornia and their mandates as a form of ramming, cramming, call it what you want. ;)
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
Sorry, I looked at Kalifornia and their mandates as a form of ramming, cramming, call it what you want. ;)
Excessive encouragement, yeah I don't totally disagree. But just like my guns, they can't make me give them up. Thing is, I don't have a problem with EVs. My other car is staying for the time being though. Most states are going to adopt similar policies about no new ICE cars; that does not remove the existing cars or used ones.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
That was my intent back when I first bought my EV. But I re-discovered some old wisdom: Drive your ICE car nearly everyday or at the very least, every other day. Otherwise, you will have battery related starting problems. If you use the EV as an everyday, around town car, saving the ICE car for longer road trips, you may encounter the same trouble. My solution was to get rid of the ICE car. (Yes, I did have jumper cables and an old 12V car battery charger. None of that really helped.)
A 'Battery Tender' is the ticket to keeping infrequently used ICE vehicles in a perfect state of readiness ;)

 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
Excessive encouragement, yeah I don't totally disagree. But just like my guns, they can't make me give them up. Thing is, I don't have a problem with EVs. My other car is staying for the time being though. Most states are going to adopt similar policies about no new ICE cars; that does not remove the existing cars or used ones.
Agreed, although living in the pot-hole state of Pa as more of the current 'heavy' EV come onto the roads it will be interesting to see how the States work out the highway tax burden, not to mention the accident crash stats that will for sure climb
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
Agreed, although living in the pot-hole state of Pa as more of the current 'heavy' EV come onto the roads it will be interesting to see how the States work out the highway tax burden, not to mention the accident crash stats that will for sure climb
I don't think accidents will increase, but the cost incurred due to those accidents will for sure.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
I don't think accidents will increase, but the cost incurred due to those accidents will for sure.
yes, I wasn't to clear with my point. The weight difference, combined with the lithium fire potential issues and as you stated the accident cost to repair.

One other thought, until we get the weight of these vehicles more in line, tire issues and expense will be another area of concern perhaps ?
 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
yes, I wasn't to clear with my point. The weight difference, combined with the lithium fire potential issues and as you stated the accident cost to repair.

One other thought, until we get the weight of these vehicles more in line, tire issues and expense will be another area of concern perhaps ?
You save on brakes and certain other common maintenance because you don't need them quite as much, but you will go through tires more frequently depending on how you drive and the tires themselves. I am not sure if that is a wash or not though. Most EVs I believe come with tires that sort or take this into account and are longer wearing intended for a heavier vehicle, but it is a concern.

The weight translates to additional wear to the roads themselves, especially in high traffic areas.
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Ninja
You save on brakes and certain other common maintenance because you don't need them quite as much, but you will go through tires more frequently depending on how you drive and the tires themselves. I am not sure if that is a wash or not though. Most EVs I believe come with tires that sort or take this into account and are longer wearing intended for a heavier vehicle, but it is a concern.

The weight translates to additional wear to the roads themselves, especially in high traffic areas.
speaking of weight ............

 
j_garcia

j_garcia

Audioholic Jedi
months old, but worth a look if you haven't seen it ........

Where exactly is the hydrogen going to come from though? At ~$18 a gallon because there are so few places that generate it, it isn't exactly easier to adopt. While the tech may be great, the infrastructure to support it is much father away. They are underplaying that aspect. Toyota and Honda were both big into hydrogen and it hasn't panned out, but hydrogen hybrids could be a possibility.
 
BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
Ok Swerd and others, do you feel 'duped' ??

Not really a joke of a article, but quite the Mr. Bean mentality...

“In terms of manufacture, these cars have paid their environmental dues"

So, after they are made, ICE vehicles no longer have any environmental impact? And THAT'S his takeaway? I highly doubt it.
Likewise, he states "CO2 emissions could be dramatically reduced if our current fleet of cars bought new were kept by the original owner for five years, rather than sold after an average of just three years."
Yep! After three years, those cars are just thrown in the garbage can. They aren't resold to others who then drive them for years, and resold again to be driven for years more.
He's proving to be far more like the idiot character he plays on screen rather than any type of person with even a basic degree.

The environmental impact, AND ISSUES, of EVs are quite well documented. Anyone speaking about the issues associated with EVs should actually speak to the actual issues instead of the ridiculous ignorance portrayed in this article.

ICE vehicles pollute significantly more over their lifespan than EVs. EVs pollute significantly more during the manufacturing process. That's a pretty simply concept. The crossover point, where EVs are a smaller carbon footprint is many yeas later.

Here's the rub: ICE vehicles aren't new. EVs, as a technology, are still really in their infancy. Anyone buying today is still a fairly early adopter. No bleeding edge. Maybe not even 'cutting edge' anymore. But, early.

EVs will never be everywhere until certain problems are really addressed. Things like charging times and recycling/replacement batteries are addressed.

Why won't a lot of road warriors buy EVs? It takes too long to charge.
Why won't apartment dwellers buy EVs? It takes too long to charge!
Why won't people in single car homes buy EVs? IT TAKES TOO LONG TO CHARGE!!!!
(yes, there are exceptions)

But, what about when the technology gets to a point where it takes five minutes to get 300 miles? Or five minutes to get 500 miles? How will these very same people feel then?

I'm not buying an EV because of the environment. I care about it, but it's not my first thought. I'm buying it because I live and work in a metropolitan area. I swear, when I drive, I see a Tesla as one out of about every 30 cars on the road. EVs are all over the place in my area. Just outside of Washington DC. Not Montgomery County, but Loudoun. An area where every other person has a 20-30 mile commute to the office. Many own single family homes, and we have (relatively speaking) high incomes and multiple cars in the home. I did a TON of soul searching on whether an EV would be the best way to go. But, because I do have access to a ICE for family trips, and I'm dropping $60+ a week on fill ups, it seemed like it made a lot of sense to get a smaller EV for my daily 50+ miles of driving and the occasional visit to family in the area with less than a 150 mile day being what I see 350+ days a year.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Your response above is well said. (FWIW, I live in Montgomery County, but I bought my EV in Loudoun County, at Don Beyer Dulles Volvo.)
Here's the rub: ICE vehicles aren't new. EVs, as a technology, are still really in their infancy. Anyone buying today is still a fairly early adopter. No bleeding edge. Maybe not even 'cutting edge' anymore. But, early.
Internal combustion engines have been around for over a century. Yes, they've been developed & improved often. But, they've reached a limit. They can be made to burn less gasoline, diesel, or ethanol, but they cannot eliminate carbon dioxide as a consequence of combustion.

Not that any of that matters to fans of front-heavy cars with huge V8 engines. Such engines do produce large amounts of torque at low RPM, but they pale compared to the amount of torque produced by the electric motor(s) in an EV, at any RPM.
 

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