Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
After three Pfizer shots, should I switch the fourth with Moderna?
If you can get Moderna for your fourth shot, go for it. It won't cause harm. Otherwise, get whatever is available – but be sure to get that fourth shot.

I think there is little different in the immune responses between the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. I've not read any scientific report that directly says that, it's just my opinion.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Here's an opinion piece from the NYT about potential nasal vaccines for COVID-19. If it works it works, of course, but I've always wondered if we really know that the COVID virus enters through the nasal cavity and not the lungs? (or some combination of both)
The idea of routes of immunization other than direct injection has been around for a long time. In theory, giving a vaccine for a respiratory virus through the nose could work better than an injected vaccine. Something sprayed into the nose should reach the tonsils in the back of the throat, where immune reactions begin to take place. Going into the lungs isn't necessary.

A few years ago, this idea of a nasal spray vaccine was tried for the flu. Remember 'Flu Mist'? It was developed hoping that more people would get the nasal spray than the injected vaccine. After a few years, it was taken off the market, as it wasn't as effective as the injected flu vaccine. I guess that route of immunization wasn't proven ineffective – only that Flu Mist wasn't effective against that year's flu strain.

The original polio vaccine, the Salk vaccine, was given by injection. A few years later it was replaced by an oral vaccine, the Sabin vaccine. Its development took longer, but was found to be more effective in the long run. When polio virus infects humans, it resides mainly in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The Sabin vaccine was found to lead to immunization in lymph node-like structures, called Peyer's patches, associated with the small intestine. The lumen of the GI tract is exposed to the external environment; much of it is populated with potentially pathogenic microorganisms. Peyer's patches are where immune surveillance & responses happen to bacteria and viruses found in the intestinal lumen. Peyer's patches act for the GI system much as the tonsils act for the respiratory system, trapping foreign particles, surveilling them, and destroying them.
 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
More thoughts on a nasal Covid vaccine …

The mRNA vaccines were the first vaccines developed for Covid-19. Because the pandemic was a clear public health emergency, they were rapidly developed and put through very large clinical trials in record time. But I doubt if mRNA vaccines work unless they are directly injected into cells. If given through the nose, or any other extracellular location, the mRNA will be rapidly degraded. The mRNA has to be present inside living cells before the Spike protein mRNA blueprint can be translated into Spike protein molecules that the immune system can respond to.

For a nasal mist vaccine against Covid-19, a different, protein-based vaccine has to be developed, and tested by standard injection route, before it can be tried as a nasal mist. This will take time. And if it gets put into use, it will have to work as good as or better than the mRNA vaccines.
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
After three Pfizer shots, should I switch the fourth with Moderna?
Why not? The Moderna vaccine is the same type as the Pfizer. It has 50% more of the mRNA portion than the Pfizer. Some surveys have concluded that it was slightly more effective than the Pfizer.
As for me, I had two Pfizers first and the last two shots were Moderna's.
That is the link to a Lancet article reporting Moderna's better efficiency.
 
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cpp

cpp

Audioholic Samurai
If you can get Moderna for your fourth shot, go for it. It won't cause harm. Otherwise, get whatever is available – but be sure to get that fourth shot.

I think there is little different in the immune responses between the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. I've not read any scientific report that directly says that, it's just my opinion.
I just stayed with Pfizer all the way for my 4th. Why, I trust my doctors at Mayo. Hell I'm alive because of them,. ;)
 
Dan

Dan

Senior Audioholic
There is a new shortage arising that is starting to make national news as a result of coronavirus. This directly affects my work as a radiologist and will affect millions of patients in this country as well as around the world in the next few months. There is a world wide shortage of iodinated contrast media (popularly but inaccurately known as "x-ray dye"}. This is used in millions of CT scans both intravenously and orally. It is essential in detected things like pulmonary emboli, aneurysms, and tumors as well as many other important diagnoses. We are already rationing use. Unfortunately cutting back on dosage isn't much of an option especially on older scanners as using too little can be worse than using none in some instances.

It turns out virtually all of the IV contrast media is made in Shanghai regardless of the brand and the plant was shuttered when the city was locked down recently due to Covid. Depending on how bad it gets there will be deaths attributable to he shortage, how many remains to be seen.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic Samurai
Is fatigue still common after having covid (ie last test result negatice)?
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Is fatigue still common after having covid (ie last test result negatice)?
I'm not sure if it's common, but I've heard several 2nd hand accounts of people who had some fatigue for a week or two, some longer. A relatively common feature in these accounts is that the person tried to resume physical activities too soon and experienced fatigue for several days.

On the other hand, I know quite a few people who did not experience fatigue after recovering (if they did, they didn't tell me)(my sense is that a lot of people who downplayed COVID are reluctant to admit that they experienced significant symptoms while they were sick or that they had any longer term symptoms).

Based on the extremely small sample of people I know who've had COVID, it appears to me that very few who had been vaccinated prior to infection experienced significant fatigue for more than a few days after recovering.

According to this article, 2-3 weeks is common:

>>>Fatigue usually lasts for 2-3 weeks after COVID-19 infection, although some people may experience fatigue for 12 weeks or more after the infection is gone.<<<

https://www.medicinenet.com/how_long_fatigue_lasts_after_covid-19_infection/article.htm
 
Verdinut

Verdinut

Audioholic Ninja
I think there is little different in the immune responses between the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines. I've not read any scientific report that directly says that, it's just my opinion.
Let me refer you to my post #8,024 containing the "Define Me" link to the Lancet article for some comparison of Moderna and Pfizer vaccines efficiency.
 
cpp

cpp

Audioholic Samurai
In our state news, It is estimated that anywhere from 10% to 30% of patients might experience long COVID after recovering—even if they weren’t very sick in the first place. A growing number of persons previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, have reported persistent symptoms, or the onset of long-term symptoms, ≥4 weeks after acute COVID-19; these symptoms are commonly referred to as post-COVID conditions, or long COVID . A good friend of my wife's, she had covid back in Oct, and she still has lung capacity issues. Her specialist told her she has long covid.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
There is a new shortage arising that is starting to make national news as a result of coronavirus. This directly affects my work as a radiologist and will affect millions of patients in this country as well as around the world in the next few months. There is a world wide shortage of iodinated contrast media (popularly but inaccurately known as "x-ray dye"}. This is used in millions of CT scans both intravenously and orally. It is essential in detected things like pulmonary emboli, aneurysms, and tumors as well as many other important diagnoses. We are already rationing use. Unfortunately cutting back on dosage isn't much of an option especially on older scanners as using too little can be worse than using none in some instances.

It turns out virtually all of the IV contrast media is made in Shanghai regardless of the brand and the plant was shuttered when the city was locked down recently due to Covid. Depending on how bad it gets there will be deaths attributable to he shortage, how many remains to be seen.
How does anyone justify using one source for anything that's critical to so many users?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Is fatigue still common after having covid (ie last test result negatice)?
It might depend on the strain- I felt like crap when I had it and I could do things, but just didn't feel like moving much. A former boss was in bed for the whole time, then he felt fine. I was pretty lethargic the whole time and still not very perky for the week after my negative test result. I know others who said they felt like they had a cold.
 
cpp

cpp

Audioholic Samurai
It might depend on the strain- I felt like crap when I had it and I could do things, but just didn't feel like moving much. A former boss was in bed for the whole time, then he felt fine. I was pretty lethargic the whole time and still not very perky for the week after my negative test result. I know others who said they felt like they had a cold.
As I noted in my post above. The after effects for some from covid can be pretty serious even after you "recover" and test negative. Anything thing from fatigue, chest pain, headaches, shortness of breath, joint pain, and even rashes plus others. It appears a lot of people who have had covid, seem to have some lingering impact that takes months to get over or never.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic Field Marshall
Yesterday, after 17 days of on & off Covid-19, I seem to have turned the corner. I've tested Negative yesterday and today. Here's the history:
  • Days 1-7 First developed symptoms – first tested Positive on day 2
  • Days 8 & 10 Tested Negative, but symptoms returned late on day 10
  • Days 11-17 Symptoms continued – tested Positive on days 12 & 15
  • Days 18-19 Tested Negative (yesterday & today)
I received 5 days of Paxlovid on days 2-7. When my symptoms returned I asked for a 2nd course, but was refused. As approved by the FDA for emergency use, Paxlovid may be given for 5 days only. A second course may be given, but only 3 weeks after finishing the first course.

I had been talking with my primary care doc during this. When Covid-19 boomeranged on me, she said that was the first time she saw that. A day later, speaking with other MDs in her group practice, she learned of 2 other similar patients. All 3 of us were immune compromised in one way or another.

I was told I'm eligible for the monoclonal antibody cocktail that clears corona virus from the blood. It's given by IV infusion, but I'm not sure how long the infusion takes. I called the phone number late Friday, leaving a voice message. They called me back this morning, ready to schedule me for tomorrow at a local hospital. I told them about my 2 days of negative home tests. So that is on hold for now – I hope it's on hold for good.

Perhaps more than 5 days of Paxlovid might be helpful. But that will have to wait until full FDA approval happens.

My wife was also infected during all this. She fully recovered after her 5-days of Paxlovid.

So that's my news. I hope others who may be immune compromised learn something useful.
Swerd, I take it the virus didn't come back a third time and you're good to go?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
As I noted in my post above. The after effects for some from covid can be pretty serious even after you "recover" and test negative. Anything thing from fatigue, chest pain, headaches, shortness of breath, joint pain, and even rashes plus others. It appears a lot of people who have had covid, seem to have some lingering impact that takes months to get over or never.
I was short of breath for a few months after I had it and still cough frequently, but it's getting better. My case was like a cold with fatigue, I would become winded very easily and I wasn't very interested in eating (I wish that part had remained, to be honest). Never lost taste or smell, didn't have muscle/joint pain/headaches, but I really didn't feel energetic, at all. After my negative test, it took awhile to feel 'normal'.
 
cpp

cpp

Audioholic Samurai
I was short of breath for a few months after I had it and still cough frequently, but it's getting better. My case was like a cold with fatigue, I would become winded very easily and I wasn't very interested in eating (I wish that part had remained, to be honest). Never lost taste or smell, didn't have muscle/joint pain/headaches, but I really didn't feel energetic, at all. After my negative test, it took awhile to feel 'normal'.
Well hopes that you contiune to improve and any after effects pass you by.
 
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