panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
Because of that ONE study....
Ah yes, the good ole "they're telling the truth, the other studies are lies because doctors don't want you to know the truth..." Feelings over facts.

They fail to realize that for ANY point of view that exists about any subject, there is bound to be some other moron that will agree with just about anything.

This is critical thinking 101. If ONE study agrees with you, and the rest don't. It's time to change your viewpoint.
 
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
Ah yes, the good ole "they're telling the truth, the other studies are lies because doctors don't want you to know the truth..." Feelings over facts.

....
Similar to what my departed sister had to say about psychics, "mine are the real ones."
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
It seems as if a few con artists have figured out how to make money off ivermectin and other such quackery. Disclaimer: I'm not sure how reliable The Intercept is, but the article appears to be generally consistent with other news reports.

>>>A network of health care providers pocketed millions of dollars selling hydroxychloroquine, ivermectin, and online consultations, according to hacked data provided to The Intercept. The data show that vast sums of money are being extracted from people concerned about or suffering from Covid-19 but resistant to vaccinations or other recommendations of public health authorities.<<<<


>>>Ivermectin can be a moneymaker, too. AFLDS charges $90 for telehealth visits with doctors willing to write off-label prescriptions for ivermectin or hydroxychloroquine—another highly touted drug that was found to be ineffective and sometimes harmful—for treating COVID. And AFLDS connects people with a digital pharmacy that will fill those prescriptions or send them to a local pharmacy, sometimes for exorbitant prices. Contacted for this story, the group declined to comment on these practices. The FLCCC also curates a list of pharmacies that will fill off-label ivermectin prescriptions, and it offers a list of physicians who use the group’s protocols. The organization did not respond to requests for comment, including on whether it earns money through these services.<<<

 
davidscott

davidscott

Audioholic Samurai
The most ridiculous line used by anti vaxers - I'm doing my own research. What you have a state of the art lab with unlimited test subjects? Un Fn Believable...
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
I'm not sure what to think about this study. Perhaps @Swerd could provide insight.

My impression of this study is that it's more or less a best guess with regards to how long immunity from infection will last, and it doesn't really say much about how severe the illness is likely to be if one is reinfected.


 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
I'm not sure what to think about this study. Perhaps @Swerd could provide insight.

My impression of this study is that it's more or less a best guess with regards to how long immunity from infection will last, and it doesn't really say much about how severe the illness is likely to be if one is reinfected.
I'd say your impression is correct, as long as you leave out the word best from "best guess". It's a guess, not a best guess. It's not even a good prediction.

It's speculation based on comparison of virus genomes only. It assumed that human host immune responses are limited to circulation antibody levels and ignored the human cellular immune responses to the virus. We already know for certain that's incorrect.

The gold standard would be a controlled clinical trial. But this would also require an FDA-approved time machine so we could jump to the future to collect data that we cannot know for 2 to 5 years down the road. So, I think this is only sophisticated looking genetic masturbation.
 
panteragstk

panteragstk

Audioholic Spartan
No surprise coming from professional quacks.
I've personally known 2 different people that have died of cancer by listening to a chiropractor instead of going to an actual doctor.

That was 20 years ago, seems they've gotten worse.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
Not sure if anyone else noticed, but a preprint study that had claimed there is a 1 in 1,000 risk of myocarditis from vaccination has been retracted due to a rather extreme math error. It is rather shocking (at least to me) that such a simple error could appear in a preprint from what appears to be a legitimate source (The University of Ottawa Heart Institute).

Some antivaxxers and antivax-friendly news sources are apparently still running with the original (incorrect) study findings.

>>>The study had calculated an incidence rate of myocarditis in the Ottawa region post-vaccination by dividing the number of occurrences of the heart inflammation condition over a two-month period (June and July 2021) in Ottawa (32) by the total number of vaccinations in the area (reported as 32,379 in the pre-print).

The incidence rate of myocarditis, using these figures, equates to 10 for every 10,000 doses of the vaccine.

The pre-print paper had used an incorrect figure for the number of doses administered in Ottawa over that two-month period, however.

Between the week beginning May 30 and the week starting July 25, there had been 845,930 vaccines administered in the Ottawa region, according to data published by Ottawa Public Health, which is far greater than the figure used to calculate the incidence rate (32,379) ( here ).

The denominator (total vaccines administered over a two-month period in Ottawa) used to calculate the incidence rate of myocarditis in the pre-print study was approximately 25 times smaller than the correct figure.

The study was then withdrawn on September 24 and in a statement the researchers said: "Our reported incidence appeared vastly inflated by an incorrectly small denominator (ie number of doses administered over the time period of the study). We reviewed the data available at Open Ottawa and found that there had indeed been a major underestimation, with the actual number of administered doses being more than 800,000 (much higher than quoted in the paper)” ( archive.is/UCKQK ).

“In order to avoid misleading either colleagues or the general public and press, we the authors unanimously wish to withdraw this paper on the grounds of incorrect incidence data,” they added. . . .

In response to the retracted pre-print, a spokesperson for the Centers for Disease Prevention and Control (CDC) sent Reuters a study released on September 3 which monitored adverse events following mRNA vaccines between December 14, 2020, and June 26, 2021, with data from Vaccine Safety Datalink. ( here ).

“Analyses of all ages combined did not detect a significant association between myocarditis/pericarditis and mRNA vaccines,” the report noted, although adding that there was evidence of “an association between mRNA vaccines and myocarditis/pericarditis in younger individuals”.<<<


 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
I've personally known 2 different people that have died of cancer by listening to a chiropractor instead of going to an actual doctor.

That was 20 years ago, seems they've gotten worse.
Against my better judgement, I went to a presentation by a chiropractor a couple years ago. In one sense I have to give them credit for converting decidedly gaseous claims into a surprisingly persuasive presentation that carefully skirted making factual claims that were disprovable. The gist of it was "We don't just treat illness, we make you healthy and happy so you won't get sick." (for a mere $$$ per month if you sign up for their plan, which "saves" you $ per month compared to paying for each visit separately). I can see why some people are sucked in by this stuff.

In some ways it reminded me of the ever-popular claim for nutritional supplements to the effect that "[Our incredibly wonderful product Y] supports X" (where X is heart health, brain function, etc.). In almost every case, one could insert "cheeseburger" for "Y" and it would still be a "true" statement in some sense of the word "support." Short of rat poison, how many things can you swallow that don't in some way support some biological function? (that's a rhetorical question, but I'll start with "bubblegum" based on personal experience)(that was just a joke).
 
Last edited:
mtrycrafts

mtrycrafts

Audioholic Slumlord
I've personally known 2 different people that have died of cancer by listening to a chiropractor instead of going to an actual doctor.

That was 20 years ago, seems they've gotten worse.
Did the family sue those chiros?
 
newsletter

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
Top