M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
This allows them to tell killer T-cells to ignore the tumor cells and die.
I guess that in layman's terms the cancer cells tell the killer T cells: "F off and die!"

That was a very helpful overview of the topic. I appreciate your responses.

Cancer and Alzheimers run in my family, and I've wondered if fasting to induce autophagy might help reduce the risk. So far, fasting sounds unpleasant enough to dissuade me, but cancer and Alzheimers are also unpleasant. I guess the question is if autophagy is capable of eliminating cells that have some mutations that could lead to cancer before the cells become fully cancerous.

>>>Autophagy is receiving a lot of attention for the role it may play in preventing or treating cancer, too. “Autophagy declines as we age, so this means cells that no longer work or may do harm are allowed to multiply, which is the MO of cancer cells,” explains Keatley. While all cancers start from some sort of defective cells, Petre says that the body should recognize and remove those cells, often using autophagic processes. That’s why some researchers are looking at the possibility that autophagy may lower the risk of cancer.

While there’s no scientific evidence to back this up, Petre says some studiesTrusted Source suggest that many cancerous cells can be removed through autophagy. “This is how the body polices the cancer villains,” she explains. “Recognizing and destroying what went wrong and triggering the repairing mechanism does contribute to lowering the risk of cancer.”<<<


 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
The geographic patterns that emerge in the globalepidemics.org COVID risk map (new cases per 100k population) are somewhat interesting. For example, there's a large red high risk area that extends through the central portions of Missouri and Arkansas, but this red zone does not precisely follow the state borders. On the other hand, there appears to be a fairly clear change in risk level along the border between Missouri and Iowa. Just an idle observation.

1626284993173.png
1626287665691.png



 
Swerd

Swerd

Audioholic Warlord
Cancer and Alzheimers run in my family, and I've wondered if fasting to induce autophagy might help reduce the risk. So far, fasting sounds unpleasant enough to dissuade me, but cancer and Alzheimers are also unpleasant. I guess the question is if autophagy is capable of eliminating cells that have some mutations that could lead to cancer before the cells become fully cancerous.
Cancer and Alzheimer's Disease runs in a lot of families. They both occur mainly in wealthy countries, where people live long enough (beyond roughly 60 years) to suffer from them. In third world countries many more people die from malnutrition or infectious diseases, such as malaria, before they age enough to worry about cancer or Alzheimer's.

My first reaction in reading that review article is that the authors aren't wrong. Autophagy is a necessary part of the greater process of cell & tissue homeostasis and immune surveillance. These are very complex and poorly understood processes. It is clear that in many people, age 60 or older, start loosing their ability to quickly heal wounds, become immunized, or mount as potent an immune response as they could when they were younger. I may be displaying my scientific prejudices learned from hanging around too many cancer therapy guys for too long, but I think this idea is far from ready to produce anything useful – at present. I'm not dismissing the idea outright. We simply don't know enough about it yet.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic General
Wow is this one really sad. Every time I empathize with Keilar. I can see it in her eyes. Probably tens of thousands of deaths they have on their hands. Trump Republicans simply don't give a poop! I am pro-capitalism, but after these past five years I don't think I can ever go back. Sad sad times. Roll the tape.....
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Wow is this one really sad. Every time I empathize with Keilar. I can see it in her eyes. Probably tens of thousands of deaths they have on their hands. Trump Republicans simply don't give a poop! I am pro-capitalism, but after these past five years I don't think I can ever go back. Sad sad times. Roll the tape.....
I highly doubt any of those FOX talking heads have refused the vaccine - if they have, they're even dumber than they sound. To frame the vaccine program as an effort to "control people" is unconscionable. They're essentially telling people to cut off their own noses to spite their faces.

If the choice of refusing the vaccine only affected themselves, it would be sad, but, oh well...what are you gonna do?

However, they are putting others who can't take the vaccine for medical reasons at risk. They are also needlessly tying up hospital beds. And, possibly worst of all, they are making themselves petri dishes for the emergence of new strains - strains that could possibly defeat our vaccines.

History will not be kind to them.
 
Teetertotter?

Teetertotter?

Full Audioholic
Wife and I are fully vaccinated and now back to wearing our masks. Just b/c, as you never know where people have been and we wish to reduce the risk of COVID that seems to be growing.....again. Then hearing those that have received the vaccination, and them getting COVID. I am 78 with COPD. Having been vaccinated, does not mean you are fully protected.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
I highly doubt any of those FOX talking heads have refused the vaccine - if they have, they're even dumber than they sound. To frame the vaccine program as an effort to "control people" is unconscionable. They're essentially telling people to cut off their own noses to spite their faces.

If the choice of refusing the vaccine only affected themselves, it would be sad, but, oh well...what are you gonna do?
A lot of the anti vaccine rhetoric seems to conflate one’s ability to choose with the wisdom of which choice is made.

Hand in hand with this, some people seem to make choices based on whether or not they feel pressured to make a certain choice rather than the merits of the options.

But, like you said, what are you going to do?
 
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cpp

cpp

Audioholic Field Marshall
A lot of the anti vaccine rhetoric seems to conflate one’s ability to choose with the wisdom of which choice is made.

Hand in hand with this, some people seem to make choices based on whether or not they feel pressured to make a certain choice rather than the merits of the options.

But, like you said, what are you going to do?
I see those same people as those that reuse to wear seat belts, have a little road rage, smoke in no smoking areas, drink and drive, text and drive etc... Just your I don't give poop what the laws are or what the medicial facts/test are saying.
 
D

Dude#1279435

Audioholic General

Interesting covid fact- Lee Fierro, who played the mother of the child killed by jaws on the floatation device, died from covid in April 2020 at the age of 91.
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
This is ironic. The unvaccinated are afraid of long terms effects of vaccines despite the lack of evidence to support the fear, but they are not concerned about the well documented long term effects of COVID.

This begs the question: why are they afraid of a short mRNA strand that can only cause the body to produce a spike protein, but they are not afraid of live viruses that releases a full RNA set into the host's cells, forcing the cells to make and release more live viruses into the host? For me, this is the single biggest mystery of the antivaxer belief system. I'm starting to think it's more of a cult than anything.

From the first link below:

>>>Asked to pick the “most important reason” they haven’t been vaccinated . . . The most important reason, according to 37 percent of unvaccinated Americans, is that they’re “concerned about long-term side effects.”. . . when unvaccinated skeptics are asked to select “all” the reasons they don’t trust the COVID vaccines . . . Seventy percent say they’re concerned about long-term side effects . . .<<<

From the second link below, here's how common long term effects from COVID are:

>>>We evaluated the proportion of individuals reporting not to have fully recovered since SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the proportion reporting fatigue (Fatigue Assessment Scale), dyspnea (mMRC dyspnea scale) or depression (DASS-21) at six to eight months after diagnosis. . . . At six to eight months, 111 (26%) reported not having fully recovered. 233 (55%) participants reported symptoms of fatigue, 96 (25%) had at least grade 1 dyspnea, and 111 (26%) had DASS-21 scores indicating symptoms of depression.<<<


 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
This is ironic. The unvaccinated are afraid of long terms effects of vaccines despite the lack of evidence to support the fear, but they are not concerned about the well documented long term effects of COVID.

This begs the question: why are they afraid of a short mRNA strand that can only cause the body to produce a spike protein, but they are not afraid of live viruses that releases a full RNA set into the host's cells, forcing the cells to make and release more live viruses into the host? For me, this is the single biggest mystery of the antivaxer belief system. I'm starting to think it's more of a cult than anything.

From the first link below:

>>>Asked to pick the “most important reason” they haven’t been vaccinated . . . The most important reason, according to 37 percent of unvaccinated Americans, is that they’re “concerned about long-term side effects.”. . . when unvaccinated skeptics are asked to select “all” the reasons they don’t trust the COVID vaccines . . . Seventy percent say they’re concerned about long-term side effects . . .<<<

From the second link below, here's how common long term effects from COVID are:

>>>We evaluated the proportion of individuals reporting not to have fully recovered since SARS-CoV-2 infection, and the proportion reporting fatigue (Fatigue Assessment Scale), dyspnea (mMRC dyspnea scale) or depression (DASS-21) at six to eight months after diagnosis. . . . At six to eight months, 111 (26%) reported not having fully recovered. 233 (55%) participants reported symptoms of fatigue, 96 (25%) had at least grade 1 dyspnea, and 111 (26%) had DASS-21 scores indicating symptoms of depression.<<<


I've overheard a couple of people express the same concern, so I "did the Google".

Feature Article: Long-term Side Effects of COVID-19 Vaccine? What We Know. | Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (chop.edu)

To summarize, when it comes to vaccines, possible side-effects tend to reveal themselves within a couple of months. Since the anti-COVID adenovirus and mRNA vaccines have been in use for much longer than that and in hundreds of millions of people, we know what all of the side effects are - none of which warrant complete avoidance of all these vaccines.
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
I think the point is covid is airborne and can be transmitted immediately and spread massively. These other things like junk food, smoking, alcohol, automobile [crashes] are part of industry and cannot be removed. It's apples & oranges to compare.
It's not immediate- it takes more time of exposure, and the potential victim needs to be susceptible. The main issue is whether it's aerosol or droplets- the aerosol form floats much longer and distributes better than droplets, which fall out of the air sooner, but may land on surfaces, where they may survive for a while..
 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
I've overheard a couple of people express the same concern, so I "did the Google".

Feature Article: Long-term Side Effects of COVID-19 Vaccine? What We Know. | Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (chop.edu)

To summarize, when it comes to vaccines, possible side-effects tend to reveal themselves within a couple of months. Since the anti-COVID adenovirus and mRNA vaccines have been in use for much longer than that and in hundreds of millions of people, we know what all of the side effects are - none of which warrant complete avoidance of all these vaccines.
Based on everything I've seen, there's no reason to think there will be any long term effects due to the vaccines. But, it's not possible to know with absolute certainty what will happen in the future.

The people who say they will not get a vaccine for fear of possible long term effects have chosen a criteria that cannot be satisfied. It's just a another way of deciding one will never get vaccinated.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Based on everything I've seen, there's no reason to think there will be any long term effects due to the vaccines. But, it's not possible to know with absolute certainty what will happen in the future.

The people who say they will not get a vaccine for fear of possible long term effects have chosen a criteria that cannot be satisfied. It's just a another way of deciding one will never get vaccinated.
While there isn't absolute certainty that those of us who received the vaccine won't grow tails at some point down the road, I think the math is on our side.
 
GO-NAD!

GO-NAD!

Audioholic Spartan
Breaking news:U.S. border to remain closed until at least Aug. 21 | CBC News

Canada will open its border to fully-vaccinated US citizens on Aug 9th, while the US land border will remain closed to non-essential travel until Aug 21st.

Canada had a total of 380 new cases yesterday (Nova Scotia has had 3 cases over the past week). The US had 37,000. Please don't take offence when I say I have no urge to come visit right now...
 
Mikado463

Mikado463

Audioholic Samurai
Breaking news:U.S. border to remain closed until at least Aug. 21 | CBC News

Canada will open its border to fully-vaccinated US citizens on Aug 9th, while the US land border will remain closed to non-essential travel until Aug 21st.

Canada had a total of 380 new cases yesterday (Nova Scotia has had 3 cases over the past week). The US had 37,000. Please don't take offence when I say I have no urge to come visit right now...
Understood, wife and I were planning on visiting friends in Ottawa next month, we shall see .......
 
R

rnatalli

Audioholic Ninja
A lot of the anti vaccine rhetoric seems to conflate one’s ability to choose with the wisdom of which choice is made.

Hand in hand with this, some people seem to make choices based on whether or not they feel pressured to make a certain choice rather than the merits of the options.

But, like you said, what are you going to do?
Unfortunately, it's going to take the death of a close family member for some to finally realize. This story was posted today about an Alabama doctor's experiences:

 
M

Mr._Clark

Audioholic General
Unfortunately, it's going to take the death of a close family member for some to finally realize. This story was posted today about an Alabama doctor's experiences:

Yeah, I saw that article.

Here's an example of a guy who apparently opposes vaccines purely because he thinks it's the government's "agenda." I fail to see the logic in this.

>>>Roughly one in three Louisianans are fully vaccinated. This week, the state's health department reported the highest number of COVID-19 hospitalizations since late February. Scott Roe is one of them.

"Here I am recovering, getting out of here finally tomorrow. Am I going to get a vaccine? No," Roe said. "Because there's too many issues with these vaccines."

This father, former baseball coach, small business owner and hunter caught COVID and then developed pneumonia.

"Before you got sick," Begnaud asked Roe, "if you would have had a chance to get the vaccine and prevent this, would you have taken the vaccine?"

"No," Roe said. "I would have gone through this, yes sir… Don't shove it down my throat. That's what local, state, federal administration is trying to do - shove it down your throat."

"What are they shoving," Begnaud asked, "the science?"

"No they're shoving the fact that that's their agenda," Roe said, "their agenda is to get you vaccinated."<<<

 

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