A

ARTEST4ECHO

Audiophyte
Ok, long story short, I am a volunteer Church Technically Specialist. Basically it means and since I know a little bit about technology they asked me run the COVID broadcasting and the Audio System in our chapel.

When the church upgraded it's broadcast system, which the old XLR Audio system feeds into, all all of a sudden if you plug anything into the XLR system that need to be be plugged into a 120 V socket you get a ton of static (like the static sound on an old television)

I've tried adding a "Ebtech Hum X - Plug-Style AC Voltage Ground Loop Hum Eliminator' and a "Hosa GLT-255 XLR Female to XLR Male Ground Lift Hum Stopper" hoping it was a ground loop or something.

Does anybody have any suggestions on things I might try. Remember it only happens when you plug in something that needs 120 volts. Regular mics work battery, powered computers will work, and even battery powered microphones will work if the pickup is battery powered also. I really don't want to fly the installers back out her.
 
Eppie

Eppie

Audioholic Samurai
Ground loop hum is usually very recognizable as it is a 60Hz tone. If you have static like an old television that is off station, then it sounds like something else is going on. What happens with a battery powered computer if you plug in the power adapter? It may help to know the make and model if your audio system and maybe include a photo of the connection panel. What are you using for your broadcast system and how is it patched into the audio system? If you disconnect the broadcast system do the static issues on the audio system go away?
 
highfigh

highfigh

Audioholic Slumlord
Ok, long story short, I am a volunteer Church Technically Specialist. Basically it means and since I know a little bit about technology they asked me run the COVID broadcasting and the Audio System in our chapel.

When the church upgraded it's broadcast system, which the old XLR Audio system feeds into, all all of a sudden if you plug anything into the XLR system that need to be be plugged into a 120 V socket you get a ton of static (like the static sound on an old television)

I've tried adding a "Ebtech Hum X - Plug-Style AC Voltage Ground Loop Hum Eliminator' and a "Hosa GLT-255 XLR Female to XLR Male Ground Lift Hum Stopper" hoping it was a ground loop or something.

Does anybody have any suggestions on things I might try. Remember it only happens when you plug in something that needs 120 volts. Regular mics work battery, powered computers will work, and even battery powered microphones will work if the pickup is battery powered also. I really don't want to fly the installers back out her.
HumX is for ground loops and that's not your problem.

Make sure that whatever is receiving the signal isn't providing 48V phantom power for the old mics.

List ALL of the equipment in the system, whether it's used every time, or only occasionally. Mixer, mics, amps & all other pieces.
 
slipperybidness

slipperybidness

Audioholic Warlord
Who did the upgrade to the church system?

If that was contracted out, then the person that did the work needs to come get this problem fixed.

@TLS Guy is likely the most knowledgeable member to help you out here.
 
TLS Guy

TLS Guy

Seriously, I have no life.
Who did the upgrade to the church system?

If that was contracted out, then the person that did the work needs to come get this problem fixed.

@TLS Guy is likely the most knowledgeable member to help you out here.
I think this will be hard to sort out at long range. Each component needs to be tested individually, to see if it is working correctly. I suspect in this case there is an item of equipment with a major malfunction, or there is a major equipment incompatibility.

So to be any help, we need a complete equipment list and a detailed diagram of all connections in the entire system.
 
BMXTRIX

BMXTRIX

Audioholic Warlord
I agree. Troubleshooting wise, I tend to lean towards disconnecting all the components one-by-one, and hopefully the noise goes away at some point, which would identify the issue. It could be amplifier related. It could be wiring related, or it could be a single source causing the issues. I've seen wiring done wrong so many times that it blows me away. Even wiring between a mixing board and a amplifier gets screwed up like crazy.

I did a job where the system had a balanced amplifier, but a unbalanced source. The client asked me to upgrade their audio system after I moved the system from their old location. Found out, when I reinstalled it, that it had been wired wrong for years. I fixed the wiring and the system played back audio at about ten times the volume it could before with perfect clarity. (that's what happens when you wire unbalanced stereo as balanced mono!)

At the end of the day, this really does require a specialist. As mentioned, those who did the installation/upgrade work when there was NO problem, should return to take a look at it since there is a problem. You can request that someone other than the installer come out to troubleshoot. My last company employed both installation techs, as well as a service specialist. The service tech requires far more training than a installation technician as they must know the ins and outs of troubleshooting.

For remote support, as has been mentioned, we would need a much better idea of what all is connected and how it all goes together.

I did a church setup and replaced their old analog board with a full digital DSP. It allowed them to plug in a analog board for major productions, but gave them one-touch usability for weekly congregations. I would say that most churches, unless they have a fairly well trained staff in AV, should have as simple as a system as possible.
 
J

justincoates

Audiophyte
I agree. Troubleshooting wise, I tend to lean towards disconnecting all the components one-by-one, and hopefully the noise goes away at some point, which would identify the issue. It could be amplifier related. It could be wiring related, or it could be a single source causing the issues. I've seen wiring done wrong so many times that it blows me away. Even wiring between a mixing board and a amplifier gets screwed up like crazy.

I did a job where the system had a balanced amplifier, but a unbalanced source. The client asked me to upgrade their audio system after I moved the system from their old location. Found out, when I reinstalled it, that it had been wired wrong for years. I fixed the wiring and the system played back audio at about ten times the volume it could before with perfect clarity. (that's what happens when you wire unbalanced stereo as balanced mono!)

At the end of the day, this really does require a specialist. As mentioned, those who did the installation/upgrade work when there was NO problem, should return to take a look at it since there is a problem. You can request that someone other than the installer come out to troubleshoot. My last company employed both installation techs, as well as a service specialist. The service tech requires far more training than a installation technician as they must know the ins and outs of troubleshooting.

For remote support, as has been mentioned, we would need a much better idea of what all is connected and how it all goes together.

I did a church setup and replaced their old analog board with a full digital DSP. It allowed them to plug in a analog board for major productions, but gave them one-touch usability for weekly congregations. I would say that most churches, unless they have a fairly well trained staff in AV, should have as simple as a system as possible.
Very complete and useful answer, everything is clear and to the point.
It's been almost a month now, just wondering if the problem has been fixed? or not
 
J

justincoates

Audiophyte
Very complete and useful answer, everything is clear and to the point like on this page.
It's been almost a month now, just wondering if the problem has been fixed? or not
It's still interesting to know whether this problem was solved or not. Theoretically, the problem should go away
 
H

heightshare

Audioholic Intern
Ok, long story short, I am a volunteer Church Technically Specialist. Basically it means and since I know a little bit about technology they asked me run the COVID broadcasting and the Audio System in our chapel.

When the church upgraded it's broadcast system, which the old XLR Audio system feeds into, all all of a sudden if you plug anything into the XLR system that need to be be plugged into a 120 V socket you get a ton of static (like the static sound on an old television)

I've tried adding a "Ebtech Hum X - Plug-Style AC Voltage Ground Loop Hum Eliminator' and a "Hosa GLT-255 XLR Female to XLR Male Ground Lift Hum Stopper" hoping it was a ground loop or something.

Does anybody have any suggestions on things I might try. Remember it only happens when you plug in something that needs 120 volts. Regular mics work battery, powered computers will work, and even battery powered
https://paintballbeasts.com/ microphones will work if the pickup is battery powered also. I really don't want to fly the installers back out her.
I am also looking for the answer of the same question
 
H

heightshare

Audioholic Intern
Ok, long story short, I am a volunteer Church Technically Specialist. Basically it means and since I know a little bit about technology they asked me run the COVID broadcasting and the Audio System in our chapel.

When the church upgraded it's broadcast system, which the old XLR Audio system feeds into, all all of a sudden if you plug anything into the XLR system that need to be be plugged into a 120 V socket you get a ton of static (like the static sound on an old television)

I've tried adding a "Ebtech Hum X - Plug-Style AC Voltage Ground Loop Hum Eliminator' and a "Hosa GLT-255 XLR Female to XLR Male Ground Lift Hum Stopper" hoping it was a ground loop or something.

Does anybody have any suggestions on things I might try. Remember it only happens when you plug in something that needs 120 volts. Regular mics work battery, array of objects c++ powered computers will work, and even battery powered microphones will work if the pickup is battery powered also. I really don't want to fly the installers back out her.
did you get your solution best japanese nakiri knife?
 
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