Media Room basement build

Discussion in 'Room Acoustics, System Layout & Setup' started by Swerve, Apr 15, 2013.

  1. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    I'm building a multipurpose media room and bar in a 400 sq ft L shaped room where the larger space is for AV and the rest is for the bar. This is in just under half of the basement of a house built in 1962. It's a wood framed construction with 2x4 walls 16 OC and 2x8 joists 16" OC, with forced air heating. Above this space is 3 bedrooms.

    I'm removing the duct work supplies and returns to the room in favor of electric baseboard heaters to eliminate a weak point in soundproofing. I plan to insulate, double drywall with green glue the walls and ceilings, and I might use clips and channel on the ceilings.

    However, for the remaining ducts in the joist cavities above this room that are feeding the 3 upstairs bedrooms, as well as the main trunk in a soffiit within this space, should I dampen them somehow? I'll be insulating, but that's only absorption. Here's the HVAC layout:

    cave HVAC.JPG

    I was thinking of dampening all the duct work with this, which I can get in a 5 gallon pail for $150 plus shipping and just paint brush on:

    http://acousticsubfloorpanels.com/pipesandducts/Dampingmaterial/3603.pdf

    Kineticsnoise.ca has something similar but it's $255 a pail plus shipping. http://www.kineticsnoise.ca/industrial/pdf/kdce162.pdf

    Thoughts? Experiences? Am I wasting my money?
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  2. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Well, I think I'm just going to order up the damping compound from back east. It can't hurt, and I won't be able to go back after I drywall! (well, I could, but I wouldn't). I'll order later this week barring any strong recommendations against it from anyone.

    Just finished up my Plasma's wallmount recess. I'm going to use an articulating wall mount that I can use to twist the screen towards the bar area for big games when a bunch of friends are over and are all over the room. When the TV is in it's normal position, it'll be pushed right back against the wall with minimal tilt. This will allow me to switch to turn on the projector which will then trigger the lowering of the screen in front of the TV unobstructed. The ~5" depth I gain in the recess should cater for a lot of the mount's depth.

    900x900px-LL-510caa92_wallmountrecess.jpeg

    Just need to putty up the electrical box and built in vac pipes I'm using for conduit.
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  3. Gordonj Full Audioholic

    Gordonj
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    Both products could be compared to the "Green Glue" you will be using between your dry wall layers that you referenced. While anything can help in dampening the thin layer of tin from vibrating, i would be more concerned about the transfer of sound through the opening in the bottom of the adjoining subfloor (supply register). If you have enough space between the joist and the ducting I recommend adding another layer of gyp board under the duct system creating another layer directly under the duct. Try to build a "box" around the duct system and then add your ceiling system under the "box".

    You mentioned clips and channel. Are you looking at the Kinetics "IsoMax" system? I have had very good results with that system compared to just "channel" systems. General speaking, I had gone away from channel systems due to the field installation issues associated with channels. The IsoMax system works well and is difficult to mess up.

    And then, as I am sure you have already, make sure you put a layer of acoustical batting above the ceiling system.
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  4. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Here's a pic of one of the 3 supply ducts for upstairs:

    dbea4860_ductb.jpeg

    Are you saying box in all 4 sides around the duct with drywall? I'm less concerned with sound coming down from above than I am about sound going upstairs from below. Considering this, could I just insulate and then box in the bottom of the joist cavities with a layer of drywall?

    eg:
    7bc8f50f_ductc.jpeg



    I haven't looked at any clips in much detail, but I will include Kinetics Isomax in my comparison shopping with 'Genie Clips', and the few soundproofingcompany.com have including the 'whisper clips'. Thanks for the suggestion.

    I'm not sure I'm going to clip the walls... my recess in the wall for the TV mount couples the framing, and I need the wall mount to attach to this framing. The bar area will have cabinetry along this same wall over to the right that I need to secure to the framing as well. I might just do the ceiling, and if so, then I might go with more economical clip if it doesn't make sense to go 'all out' on the ceiling and not the walls. Priority for the ceiling is minimal height loss, considering the ceiling is currently 93" rough opening, slab to joists. I might block in between the joists and mount the clips to the blocks in order to raise the overall height.


    I have Roxul thermal insulation in all my exterior walls and don't plan to remove it. However, with a second wall framed in front of my foundation, and my joist cavities still empty, I can use something else for the next layer of insulation.

    I don't like working with the pink stuff, however I've priced out some soft and friendly R14 Knauf EcoBatt® Glasswool | Knauf Insulation at 31.45 a bag or 40 cents/ sq ft. from a local drywall supplier, Dryco, so this is cheaper than Owens Corning at 65 cents/ sq ft. and Roxul at 59 cents/ sq ft. from Home Depot:
    Owens Corning | R-14 EcoTouch PINK FIBERGLAS Insulation - 15 Inch x 47 Inch x 3.5 Inch; 78.3 sq. feet (Basement, 2x4) | Home Depot Canada
    Roxul | Roxul Safe'n'Sound For Wood Studs 16 In. On Centre | Home Depot Canada

    Comparing the products isn't the easiest considering it's difficult to compare like for like, so this is what I'm looking at. The Roxul S&S claims a 0.52 absorption coefficient at 125hz and an STC of 52 with 5/8 drywall both sides on steel studs 24" OC
    http://www.roxul.com/files/RX-NA_EN/pdf/SafenSound.pdf

    Owens Corning claims 49 STC with fiberglass and 47 with rock wool with 5/8 drywall both sides on steel studs 16" OC.
    http://insulation.owenscorning.ca/assets/0/188/9d8108ba-7ba6-41bb-8398-689419cdbb54.pdf

    Knauf claims 50 STC on 3 5/8 steel studs, no spacing specified:
    http://www.knaufinsulation.ca/sites...a.com/files/EcoBatt Glasswool - datasheet.pdf

    Absorption coefficients at lower frequencies interest me more than STC considering this is for a media room with bass and not an office where soundproofing against conversations is the objective. At least Roxul claims publishes their absorption data against frequencies where the fiberglass companies don't seem to... Analysis paralysis! Absorption is the least important element to soundproofing, so I think I'll just go with the Knauf fiberglass since it's the cheapest option. Thoughts?
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  5. Gordonj Full Audioholic

    Gordonj
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    I agree, I would be more concerned about the transfer of noise from the basement to the upstairs as well. So, in light of that, see if you can isolate the register opening that is cut into your floor system. I might see if i could extend that wall area where the duct cuts across the bulk head. Since that would be the side wall to your HT room, build the wall all the way up to the sub floor and create a mass there to try and isolate the HT room from that empty cavity. one layer of gyp will not cut it there you need to put a few layers there and use acoustical caulk where the assembly meets the subfloor above. If you create that wall build up, that should help eliminate the need for the "box". You really need to build that wall up above the bulk head or you will have a bunch of noise transfer through that bulk head area above you ceiling system. Also, it looks like there is a water/utility closet beyond that bulk head. If that is the case you need to build that ceiling system up as well and then any of the three walls due to the potential sound transfer through that closet area.

    I am going to throw out the disclaimer - that due to the lack of true understanding of the room, conditions, struacture build quailty, etc all these suggestions may not amount to a hill of beans and you still may have a noise problem. Just so we are on the same page. Any advice given or obtained form this post is strickly an opinion and may not result in satisfactory results. :D

    Now that that is out of the way..... :p

    Also, look at wrapping your ducts with this - Noise Barrier Material | Model KNM-100AL .

    Then where you have to build the extended wall up around the duct you have a "cushion" for the gyp board to butt up against. Fill ALL seams, cracks, openings etc with acoustical caulk, NOT "normal" caulk. It must say "acoustical caulk".

    (Acoustical Soundproofing Caulk | Acoustical Solutions, Inc.)
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  6. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    So, here's a mock up of what I believe you're saying:
    fbd2249f_ductd.jpeg

    So box out the joist cavity from utility closet. How about double 5/8" and green glue in each cavity, with acoustic caulk all around the perimeter of both layers? Triple maybe? On the other side of the room, the registers penetrate into the above floors slightly beyond this room's exterior wall, as the upper floor overhangs the lower floor by about 18". I'll employ this same wall continuation into the joist cavity on that side as well and isolate the register from this side of the joist cavity. Now that you point this out, I understand it's another weak spot where sound can make it's way through the register to upstairs. Thanks!

    IMG_2483b.jpg

    Now that I'm at this point I could box in the undersides of the joists too and end up with a muffler of sorts along the 12' length of the joist cavity/width of the room?

    As for the walls shared with the utility closet, I'm going to double 5/8 and green glue them from the source side of course. And that door opening will get a 24" Masonite Safe and Sound door with a sweep installed in a kerfed and weatherstripped frame. As for treating the ceilings of that utility closet, I will be able to insulate the joist cavities in there, but I don't think I will be able to drywall :( Above that hot water tank are HVAC trunks, plumbing, and electrical. I just won't be able to get a contiguous drywall ceiling in there unfortunately.

    I should say that my objective is to sufficiently soundproof between floors so that for now the kid remains asleep in an above bedroom. And later- that the wife and I don't wake up when the kids are down there with friends. Further, I want to utilize highest return on investment soundproofing techniques and make sure I cover major weaknesses. It won't be a perfect room, but it can still be very good. That's my hope and what I'm striving for.
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  7. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    I'm looking at this main HVAC trunk in the bulkhead splitting the 2 sides of the overall room, and think I need to box and caulk around the trunk with a double drywall and green glue "box" as well just like the 3 supply runs in the joist cavity. Looks like it's going to be a bit of a challenge with the framing already done.

    IMG_2484b.jpg
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2013
  8. Gordonj Full Audioholic

    Gordonj
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    It really looks like you are going in a good direction and have a good grasp on the overall approach. Just keep looking for weak points in the sub floor or the walls. You would be surprised what can be a "hole". If you do "box" around the main trunk duct then i would case the entire cavity (including the beam, just to make it easy) then add your ceiling system. Make sure you caulk the seams. Also, if you do choose to use hangers then use the hangers on the "box" as well, otherwise it is now a weaker link in the chain then the ceiling system. Im not certain, with all that you are doing, that hangers will give you that much more "bang" for the buck at this point and, as you mentioned above, you are loosing ceiling height that you don't have (two layers of 5/8" is a lot of space lost....).

    Also, one other thing, that we have not discussed, I noticed a light back can in the ceiling area. Are you using flush mount lighting cans? If yes, then you now have put nice big holes in your nice ceiling.... So, you will need to look at the product utilized to make sure that the back can is as massive as possible. I would lean toward plenum rated back cans, they tend to be better at isolation. And sometimes the back cans have to be boxed around. Of course that is up to code etc. if that is even allowable. But by building a "box" around the light fixture all you have to deal with is a much smaller penetration for sound leak.

    There are some many other things we could get into but you have the basics. And even with all that you are doing there is so much more. However, what you are doing will make a huge difference. Will it be perfect? No, but much, much better then without.

    I had a friend that had a rock band that practiced in his basement (they got loud!). Anyway, he had a kid. So he decided to build a room for the band to practice in. It just so happened that the new baby's room was directly over top of the bands practice room. So he did all the basics that you are now doing. When he got done you could stand in the baby's room when the band was practicing and could barely hear the noise.

    Gordon
  9. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    By hangers, I believe you mean clips? I feared you might say I should clip the bulkhead between the ceiling and the bar area, and I agree that if I don't, then that would be a weak spot in the overall ceiling plan. This is why the dimensions of the clips are a major factor in the decision of which clip to use if I use clips at all.. I'll likely have to mock up a section and if that brings it too low, then frame blocks up into the bulkhead to raise the clip height to bring the drywall up closer, say 1/8" away from the bottom of the beam. If after this the double 5/8 is too thick, then maybe only do double 1/2" here. Achieving the same ceiling height with clips mounted in a recessed fashion with double 1/2" drywall + GG is still better than directly mounted double 5/8" + GG due to the decoupling.

    Good eye. They're HALO 4" recessed IC rated cans. They weigh nothing, and aren't air tight as they claim to be... maybe "Air-Tite" means something else. :)
    Halo Air-Tite 4 in. Recessed Housing-H99ICAT at The Home Depot

    I installed and wired them before I seriously considered sound proofing. They're staying though as they're the only built in lighting source currently in the plan... still thinking about an LED rope light in a crown molding though. Considering the 12 4" openings in both rooms is another major weakness, I will be building boxes around these cans. My plan is to build 1/2 or 3/4" MDF boxes with construction adhesive and brad nails, acoustic seal the joints, and then green glue in a 5/8 drywall liner and acoustic seal the joints. Cement board is better of course than the drywall, but I just received dimmable LED GU10 bulbs yesterday that don't produce any significant heat compared to halogen 50W bulbs. As the wiring is already done and I'd hate to cut, pull, retwist and wire nut it all over again, I'll cut a slit in the side of the boxes to allow the wiring through, then fill the slit with putty and/or glue and brad nail an MDF 'lid' over the slit and acoustic caulk around the lid. I'll remove the HALO's nail in hangers and velcro them onto 2 sides of the box and insulate around the remaining cavity between the HALO and box. I'll attach some strips along 2 side of the boxes that will then sit on the top of the hat channel (if I clip the entire ceiling) or attach them right to the joists if I don't clip the ceiling. Just like this:

    6722f8f0_potlightbox.jpeg

    The first layer of drywall will go around the box (big square hole) with acoustic caulk in the seam, and the second layer of drywall will go over the box (4" round hole) with acoustic caulk in the seam. This will ensure that the gimbal trim fits into the can housing normally. EDIT: just found that the HALO H99ICAT box has an adjustable inner housing from the plaster frame to accommodate different depth ceiling materials... I'll have to give that a whirl tonight. If I can get beyond 1" depth, then I'll mount these boxes flush with the hat channel instead, and do both layers of ceiling drywall over the housing, and just cut 1 round hole through both layers.

    This is the same plan I have to box around my 8+ ft wide 106" in-ceiling recessed motorized projection screen. HUGE HOLE! Maybe I'll go double 3/4" MDF and green glue for this box. As for mounting this surely to be heavy box, I think I might use some L shaped clips (8-10 of them?) to attach this box to the joists. Approach with the drywall- first layer around the box, second layer over the box with just an opening for the screen's ceiling trim, if it's not able to attach through a 1 1/4" depth of drywall & GG.


    If I can achieve this, I'd be ecstatic.
    Last edited: Apr 18, 2013
  10. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    The Antivibe - DL damping compound just arrived from Acoustiguard.com. 55lbs of it in a pail! Can't wait to get all the HVAC ducts servicing upstairs coated this weekend. Going to do some before and after tests to see the difference it makes.

    200x200px-ZC-4b4f27fe_IMG_2503.jpeg
  11. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Managed to get most of the first coat of the Antivibe - DL done this weekend... so little time.

    This stuff was super thick! I had to mix a little at a time and slowly. Took some out of the pail to make it more manageable. The more I stirred, the more liquid the compound became and easier to mix.

    View attachment 11836

    First coat went on pretty thin, so I'm thinking I'll end up doing 3-5 coats on all the ducts. The pail expires in a few months, so I may as well use as much up as I can. The heavier the ductwork, the better I suppose.

    View attachment 11837
  12. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Not sure where my pics went, and I couldn't edit my previous post, so here they are:
    900x900px-LL-7817a23b_IMG_2530.jpeg


    900x900px-LL-9f862a59_IMG_2543.jpeg
  13. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Got the second coat of Antivibe - DL up this weekend. It really took the clang and bang out the ducts. Did an iPhone/Youtube video of the difference. Still considering going with flexible ducting for my supplies though. I'll have to do a few more tests to decide I think.

    [video=youtube_share;ERZ0itbMxeA]http://youtu.be/ERZ0itbMxeA[/video]
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  14. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    The BAR!

    Here's my plan for the bar. I want its north wall to have a full size fridge and ~6' counter run. I also want an island in there.

    Here's a birds eye view from Ikea's kitchen planner. 4 barstools at the island, which end up at 45 degrees from the TV:

    Screen Shot 2013-05-09 at 6.47.23 PM.png

    Here's a 3D view facing the north wall of the bar:

    Screen Shot 2013-05-09 at 6.48.40 PM.jpg

    Here's another view from the media room side towards the bar side. I'm not certain I'll do the cabinet with the glass upswinging door in the top left just yet. The backsplash will be stone, like you'd see cladding a fireplace, and I'll have 2 glass shelves with LED lighting in them to illuminate the bottles placed on them.

    Screen Shot 2013-05-09 at 6.49.15 PM.jpg
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  15. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    More weaknesses to my soundproofing objective identified and fixed this past weekend:


    1. HVAC return duct

    On the upper floor, there is a hallway where there's a return vent at the bottom of a wall. Return air enters that vent, goes down through a hole in the floor, across a joist cavity, and into the return trunk ducting. This joist cavity is in the media room. My first naive attempt to address this months ago now was to
    -remove the metal sheeting that was nailed to the joists that boxed in the joist cavity to create the return,
    -recreate a shallower return duct with Thermopan (foil faced cardboard meant for HVAC return duct construction) to allow space for a batt of Roxul Safe and sound insulation to go in between the return duct and the ceiling.

    4.jpg

    No real mass and only a little absorption= WEAK!

    I pulled the Roxul down and boxed in the return duct with 5/8 drywall, and then sealed up all the joints with LePage PL Acousti-Seal.

    PL Acousti-Seal is the nastiest substance on the planet. It strings up and falls onto everything within a 4' radius and is a nightmare to clean up. I've only ever used this to seal vapor barrier to studs previously and had a few tubes left over from that job, but never again for SP purposes. I hope the GG SilenSeal isn't as nasty.

    5.jpg

    While I was there, I also removed another return going up a wall cavity into the same return trunk above. I closed off the opening with some more Thermopan and tuck tape, and now will add some drywall and acoustic sealant within the stud wall cavity.


    2. Another interior wall received a dose of DD&GG medicine.

    The south wall of the bar has a washroom on the other side that I don't want to receive sound/noise from. So, again following Soundproofingcompany.com's 'how to insulate a ceiling page', specifically, SPC Ceiling Solution 4, I added green glue and scrap 5/8 drywall within the stud cavities of the wall to dampen and add mass to the recipient wall. It was tough getting in all in there around plumbing, etc, but I've added mass and damping to that recipient wall.

    I also 'painted' the plumbing pipe with the AntiVibe DL, as well as the back of the shower stall. While it might not dampen these noise emitting items much, the Antivibe itself is heavy, and it's mass makes them vibrate less. I've got leftovers of it, and hate wasting materials, so spending it wherever I can.

    6.jpg

    When I first used this DD&GG within stud wall cavity technique on my staircase wall, I also applied acoustic sealant across the drywall seams and around the perimeter of the studs, and top and bottom plates. Should I also acoustic seal up all these joints (albeit with a friendlier acoustic sealant) or would that be a waste of time? I've added mass and damping already so am I done and just OCD?

    While I was there, someone hit the shower while I was working so I loaded up 3 lbs of Duct Seal over the water valve and copper piping leading up to the shower head that was whining from the water flow. I could hear it getting quieter as I applied it so that was interesting. It didn't eliminate it altogether, but the pipe is mounted to framing, so hands-on lesson in flanking learned!

    1.jpg

    Next is to isolate the back of the shower from the source side. My plan is to insulate, then slap up a sheet of drywall inside the stud wall cavity. I've read about the triple leaf effect... does that apply here with the fibreglass shower wall acting as the third leaf? I'm thinking not because it's light and flimsy and thus has a different resonance than drywall. The source side of this wall will be clipped and DD&GG, so from source to recipient side in order will be: DD&GG, clips, studs, insulation and an in-stud drywall sheet, insulation, shower wall. Advice?

    7.jpg
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  16. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Acoustical sealant comparison: LePage PL Acousti-Seal is horrendous- avoid it like the plague. I picked up some Grabber Acoustical Sealant from a local drywall supplier at under $6 per tube. The Grabber was infinitely better to work with than the LePage. It's white in color and pumps easy just like Alex Plus caulking. It's Green, low VOC, and has measures on the label towards LEED. I don't know for certain if it's water based, but it cleaned off my hands just as easy as Alex Plus does. They also had Tremco but it had 'industrial use only" on the label that turned me off, as well as QuietRock's acoustical sealant that was quadruple the price. They didn't have Green Glue's SilenSeal even though they carry Green Glue.

    Anyways, the Grabber acoustical sealant is a breeze to work with and I'll use this for the rest of the project I think. Here's a pic of the Grabber (white) just pumped onto a piece of drywall next to the black evil:

    acoustical sealant.jpeg
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  17. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    After over a month hiatus, I got back in there and accomplished a few more tidbits. First off was finishing off the isolation treatments on the inside of a wall where there's a finished bathroom on the other side. After thinking about the triple leaf effect I was fearing, I deduced that because the shower tub is what looks like acrylic on fiberglass or something similar, it's density and mass are so different from 5/8 drywall that it wouldn't cause the issue. Here's the before pic of the backside of the shower and associated plumbing. It was installed in what used to be a hallway and I had to add some blocking for the in stud wall drywall I added, hence the odd looking framing.

    [​IMG]

    Then I slapped in some scrap Roxul Safe & Sound Insulation:

    [​IMG]

    Finally, I inserted 5/8 within the stud wall cavity and acoustic sealed it all up. I don't want to hear someone taking a shower when I'm down here!

    [​IMG]
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  18. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    I mocked up my backer boxes for my 15 potlights out of scrap drywall. I made a few changes along the way but ultimately came up with the below. Here's the outer shell which will either be 1/2" MDF, or OSB... probably just cheaper OSB:

    [​IMG]

    Here it is with the inner shell that will be 5/8 drywall. I'm not concerned about heat because I'll be running dimmable LED bulbs (in all but one can... Lutron hasn't produced an IR-controlled Maestro dimmer switch that is compatible with dimmable LED bulbs yet, hence one lamp will be Halogen to address a minor flashing phenomenon when in the OFF position- yes, there's still evidence of current in the LED lamps when the switch is in FULL OFF position. With 1 of the 6 on that circuit swapped out with a halogen, the issue is no longer present). Also, the cans are IC rated so am substituting the recommended inner lining of cement board with just 5/8 drywall. There will also be Green Glue in between this sandwich:

    [​IMG]

    Finally, I'm adding a 1/2" OSB strips on the front to reduce the seams and create a nice 1 1/8" wide surface for acoustic sealant to seal it to the backside of the first layer of drywall. I'll slather it on the face of the can housing as well. There will be roughly 1" of air space around, and 1/2" between the top of the can and the inside of the backer box. I'll loosely fill in some scrap Roxul insulation in this space. The overall outer depth of this box will be ~7". My ceiling joists are 2x8, so I've only got 7 1/4" of joist height. Also, I want to recess my clips and channel in the ceiling so have limited space... I may even have to make these ~6.5" to preserve space between the top of the box and underside of the subfloor. I can't go any smaller though since these HALO cans are 5.5" tall.

    [​IMG]

    I'm taking the narrower of the 2 dimensions of each outer panel to Home Depot and having them rip the OSB for me. Then I'll chop these strips to length with my miter saw at home, glue, and brad nail these together. Next, I'll acoustic seal all the inside joints. Then I'll hand cut all the 5/8 drywall myself and green glue it to the inside of the OSB box. Finally, I"ll green glue the backside of the facing/sealing flanges or whatever you want to call them to the front edges of the sandwiched backer box and brad nail them on as well. I'll make the first box from start to finish and if it all goes well, then I'll do each step 14 times, stack up each piece and do the assembly of the 14 remaining boxes at the end.
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  19. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
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    Messages:
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    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    GG & DD sandwiches got fed to some joist cavities tonight. These joist cavities run over the utility closet and then over living space on the other side of the house. I've got scrap drywall that just begged for a purpose. So I made some sandwiches.

    Here's the assembly and install for all you pic lovers:

    [​IMG]

    filling and frosting

    [​IMG]


    Green Glue!

    [​IMG]


    mmmmmm.....

    [​IMG]


    Acoustical sealant!

    [​IMG]


    plugged

    [​IMG]


    and sealed

    [​IMG]


    I think the weakness in the joist cavities is addressed.

    [​IMG]
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 19, 2014
  20. Swerve Junior Audioholic

    Swerve
    Joined:
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    Location:
    Vancouver, BC
    Wiring checkpoint. Am I missing anything?

    From the AV Rack, here's what I've run

    to speakers for 9.2.

    • 12/4 to L, C, and R so I can bi-amp, or use the 2nd set of wiring for future use such as amplifying passive subs
    • 14/2 to Heights and surrounds
    • Single 16/4 to a wall next to seating for 4 Aura Bass Shakers
    • 2 X RCAs to L and R speaker locations for active subs.


    to Center Speaker location:

    • 3.5mm minijack extenstion for IR Receiver


    to Projector:

    • 2" conduit (for HDMI and future use)
    • 3.5mm minijack for an IR blaster


    to motorized Screen:

    • 3.5mm minijack for IR blaster (redundant back up to 12V control from projector)


    to TV:

    • 2X 2" conduit (for HDMI and future use)
    • 3.5mm minijack for an IR blaster on TV
    • CAT6
    • RG6


    From Projector to screen:

    • 3.5mm minijack for 12V DC control of motorized screen action.


    From Input panel on wall next to seating, I've run the following to the AV rack

    • HDMI
    • 2X USB
    • CAT6
    • 3.5MM Headphone jack (ironically)
    • CAT3 (phone)



    I'm working now to finish insulation, put up vapor barrier, then onto clips and channels on the ceilings and walls but I want to make sure I've got all the wiring I need in the walls first.
    Last edited by a moderator: Oct 19, 2014

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