Is this the world's GREATEST antenna?

Discussion in 'Televisions & Displays' started by admin, Mar 29, 2013.

  1. admin Audioholics Robot Staff Member

    admin
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    Is this the world's best antenna? It claims to be...and we are having a tough time disagreeing.

    [​IMG]

    Discuss "Antennas Direct DB8e Ultra Long Range Antenna Review" here. Read the article.
  2. Mikebiker Enthusiast

    Mikebiker
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    How is the antenna at receiving VHF transmissions?
  3. Adam Audioholic Jedi

    Adam
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    I used a similar antenna (a Channel Master 4228) for years. The eight-bay antennas really are quite nice. I swapped it out for two much lower profile RCA directional antennas just to be more considerate to my neighbors (the Channel Master was visually very obvious).

    Clint - looks like you have excellent reception! I get much better reception using an amp/preamp, so maybe you could get even more channels if you try one. I use a Channel Master CM-7777 (older version with two inputs) that works great. My towers are on a nearby mountain range, and I'm on the edge of the mountains "shadow," so some channels are challenging.
    Adam,
  4. Speedskater Audioholic

    Speedskater
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    My questions would be:

    a] What channels are you interested in?
    b] What channel range is the antenna optimized for?
    c] How windy is your location? That antenna has a lot of wind drag.
  5. Adam Audioholic Jedi

    Adam
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    It looks similar to my Channel Master, and while I was concerned about the wind, it wasn't nearly as big of a deal as I had expected. While it visually has a large cross-section, most of that area is open, so there isn't a lot of hardware to block the air flow. Anytime that you use a pole to elevate an antenna, though, you're going to want to make sure that the base is secure (and seriously consider guy wires to secure it) because of the lever arm.
    Adam,
  6. afterlife2 Audioholic Ninja

    afterlife2
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    I have this one and works great, especially since I'm higher up now I get great reception. It's outside my window. I get 70+ channels. No need for cable.:D
    [​IMG]
    Last edited: Mar 30, 2013
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  7. Swerd Audioholic Ninja

    Swerd
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    Antenna-based reception is all about location, location, location. What works well for one place, may not be good for all places.

    Florida is flat, helping long distance reception. That antenna seems like it would be ideal for your location.

    The photos in your article showed a sunny day. Have you noticed if you get better reception or more distant channels on overcast days? Along coastal regions, you can also get something called tropospheric ducting on humid summer days, allowing very long distance reception. Many years ago, I was in Pensacola, and saw how, on some days, people could pick up a TV station in New Orleans, some 200 miles away.

    In the interest of fair comparison to your old antenna, most people don't remember that their old rooftop antenna was weathered:
    • Weathered (oxidized) aluminum surfaces on rooftop antennas gradually decreases signal strength.
    • Did you replace the old antenna cable, probably coaxial RG59 or RG4? Over the years, exposure to sunlight and water also results in less signal transmission by the cables. Just installing new (unweathered) coax antenna cable has been known to make a difference.
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  8. Rickster71 Audioholic Spartan

    Rickster71
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    Great point.
    If I may add a bit.
    I'd recommend something like this: Noalox Anti-Oxidant Compound
    for the antenna joints and connections.
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  9. wiyosaya Audioholic

    wiyosaya
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    Having had some experience with large TV antennas in the past, Swerd is absolutely correct in that where the antenna is located makes a big difference. Things like water vapor, trees, etc., can be big factors for UHF reception, but atmospheric skip can be cool especially in the summer where I live.

    That said, there are some DTV channels in the US that are still on the VHF band. I live in one such area where there is at least one channel still on VHF. If anyone were to buy this antenna and they are expecting to receive VHF channels, well, they are out of luck. One would have to use a separate VHF antenna along with this antenna to receive the VHF channels.

    Also, a rotator might be a desirable option for some. Then, however, one needs to consider the wind load on such a large antenna and whether the rotator can handle such a large wind load.

    I am located in a valley, and as such, I cannot get as many digital channels as I could analog channels - which sucks, IMHO. I can basically only get local channels where analog used to bring distant stations, too. The digital TV revolution held so much promise for OTA reception. I'll blame way, way, way, way (did I say way enough :)) outdated by the time it was implemented 8VSB modulation.
  10. afterlife2 Audioholic Ninja

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  11. internetmin Audioholic

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    Looks great and like a great solution. I'm using a Winegard OTA Antenna and I'm getting directional signals close to 80-100 miles away and then I'm using an omnidirectional as well. Sounds like this is areal best of both worlds solution. I see it's in pre-release stages so now you have me keeping my eye on this!! This isn't in the norm of the posts, but I'm glad you posted as I wouldn't have seen it otherwise.
  12. hyghwayman Audioholic

    hyghwayman
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    I built my own after diving into the digital tv pool in 2006 and getting frequent drops in signal with a store bought indoor antenna.

    Attached Files:

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  13. hyghwayman Audioholic

    hyghwayman
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    Here is my second build, it has been outside for 5yrs and is needing a little lovin but still working great :D
    [​IMG]
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  14. Laval Audiophyte

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    Is DB8e much better than DB8 in all cases?

    I am just wondering if DB8e is much better compared to DB8, if a multi-directional feature is not required.

    I live in the town just north of Toronto (Canada), so we are aiming to pick up signals from Toronto and Buffalo, and they are coming from almost the same direction. So, it does not look like the multi-directional feature is much of benefit.
    My store/installer for some reason recommends DB8. If DB8 works fine in our area, would DB8e work even better and more stable? I will appreciate your advise. Thank you.
  15. balvenie Audiophyte

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    Hi Laval,

    Based on the many positive reviews of the DB8e, I bought it as a replacement for my Channel Master 4228HD, thinking it might help pull in a few Buffalo area stations that come and go. I'm located in North York, so my experience might be relevant to your situation north of Toronto. I actually found that the DB8e pulled in fewer stations than the 4228HD. Not including sub-channels, I was at most only able to get 22 channels with the DB8e, whereas the 4228HD hit a maximum number of channels of 31. I had them both on the same pole, pointed in the same direction, swapping the cable between the two. Also, I used a 7777 Titan 2 pre-amp during my testing. Given the very big price difference between these two antennas, I'm kind of miffed that I forked out $199 for the DB8e when it looks to be less effective than my $80 4228HD (both purchased at Angel Electronics in Mississauga).
  16. paulask Audiophyte

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  17. koelo Audiophyte

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    tvfool

    Hello,

    Would you mind posting a link to your TV Signal locator analysis from tvfool com? The chart tvfool generates would be very useful in comparing your RF environment with mine, and would allow me, and other readers, to estimate how many channels they can expect to receive with this antenna. Please also include in your post what is the height of the mounted antenna and what compass direction you have it pointed at.

    Thank you very much for the review.

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