How to improve mid-range and treble ?

Discussion in 'Loudspeakers' started by ArxFatalis, Sep 4, 2005.

  1. ArxFatalis Enthusiast

    ArxFatalis
    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Hi guys, I ´ve seen numerous threads explaining how to improve bass but in my case I need to know how to improve the mids and highs. Currently, I´m using two floorstanding speakers (MTX monitor 10) that consist of a 10´´ woofer, a 6-1/2 ´´ midrange and a 19 mm tweeter. These speakers sound pretty nice paired with my marantz receiver but sometimes I notice there is not enough mid - high range and too much bass. Althoug I increase the treble settings on the receiver, it doesn´t help much. Is there some kind of way to improve the mid - high range ? :confused: Thankyou for your time.
  2. droeses58 Audioholic

    droeses58
    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2005
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    7
    How tall are the speakers? You may have to either tip them back alittle or put them on stands to raise the height of the tweeter because I believe ideally you would like to have the tweeter/midrange pointed at your head when you're sitting in your sweet spot!
  3. nav Audioholic

    nav
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Messages:
    173
    Likes Received:
    4
    Rather than increase the mids and treble, maybe you're just getting too much bass or bass that just sounds obnoxious enough to bother you. Not knowing much about your speakers, I'd try to even out or damp the bass a bit and then increase the overall volume and the rest of my rambling is on that method.

    Do you happen to have a SPL meter and a calibration disc (or a laptop with a tone generator program)? Try to find out where the peek is if you can.

    Are they rear ported? If so, try moving them out from the wall/corner a bit. If that does help, experiment with placement more. If you can't leave them where they sound right permanently, think about adding some sort of damping material where the port is pointed to absorb the reflection a touch. If that still doesn't help enough, try plugging the ports with foam (can't hurt to try, right?).

    In addition or alternatively, if your receiver has a simple equalizer or tone control, try lowering the bass. If you tested with an SPL meter you'll know exactly where to lower and how much if you're using an equalizer. If it's just a tone control, adjust it and then re-test using the SPL meter at the point you determined to be the peak.
    nav,
  4. Buckeyefan 1 Audioholic Ninja

    Buckeyefan 1
    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2005
    Messages:
    4,982
    Likes Received:
    114
    Location:
    TBDBITL
    The issue with Marantz is that they only have bass and treble controls. He needs an external eq. It will make a world of difference (at least with analog sources).
  5. maximoiglesias Audioholic

    maximoiglesias
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Dominican Republic
    I have sorted out this problem before using a pair of Realistic super horn tweeters sold by Radio Shack, this tweeters you just connect them to your spakers and place them on top. This is the cheapest way to get more treble.
  6. malvado78 Full Audioholic

    malvado78
    Joined:
    Apr 29, 2005
    Messages:
    273
    Likes Received:
    24
    Location:
    Endicott, NY
    I'm not so sure this would be a good idea. Using multiple tweeters can cause cancellation and normally a well designed speaker has a crossover designed to integrate well with the rest of the speakers.
  7. maximoiglesias Audioholic

    maximoiglesias
    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2005
    Messages:
    159
    Likes Received:
    9
    Location:
    Dominican Republic
    It worked for me.
    These tweeters are designed to be connected to your main speakers.
  8. tbewick Senior Audioholic

    tbewick
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2005
    Messages:
    571
    Likes Received:
    23
    To reduce bass performance, you should move the speakers further away from any walls.

    The mid-range and treble are quite difficult for the speakers to reproduce, and I've found that vocals on speakers I've used, be it in music or movies, can sound muffled. The better the speaker, and most of the time, the more expensive the speaker, the better the mid-range/treble will be. You should also know that damping your room acoustically with a carpet, rugs, bookshelves, etc. can help to improve sound quality.

    The treble controls can do more harm than good, because lower quality ones (ie. most of them) will affect frequencies other than the ones you're interested in. I'd leave them alone unless your listening at low volumes and need a bass boost.
  9. Kurt C. Audioholic Intern

    Kurt C.
    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2005
    Messages:
    41
    Likes Received:
    2
    Location:
    Boston
    He's on to something. I had a problem similar to the one you describe--my mid/treble seemed like it was't 'loud enough' compared to bass. In my case, the problem was caused by reflected sound bouncing off of the walls/ceiling and arriving at my ears a fraction of a second after the original sound. The result was unfocussed mids and highs that didn't seem loud enough. This
    article may help you find the solution.
  10. ArxFatalis Enthusiast

    ArxFatalis
    Joined:
    May 7, 2005
    Messages:
    20
    Likes Received:
    0
    Thanks for all the feedback. I will take advice and carpet the floor and do some room adjustments to the room. . By the way, anyone has had experience with MTX speakers? What are your opinions on these speakers?

Share This Page

  • RBHsound.com
  • BlueJeansCable.com
  • SVS Sound Subwoofers
  • Experience the Martin Logan Montis
  • CEDIA