Component Cables and Coaxial?

Discussion in 'A/V Interconnects, Cables & Power Conditioning' started by gwhizz35, Mar 21, 2005.

  1. gwhizz35 Enthusiast

    gwhizz35
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    Can someone tell me if I'm currently connecting my Denon receiver to my DVD player via Component cables, do I still need to connect a Coaxial cable also?
    What's the difference? Do I need both connected or just one?
  2. markw Audioholic Overlord

    markw
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    difficult question to answer. Component video cables are coaxial cables.

    "coaxial" is a type of cable which consists of a central conductive strand, usually copper, surrounded by an insulator which is, in turn, surrounded by another layer of mesh, foil or some other conductive material. Generally, this ihas an outer insulation as well. Generally, this is 75 ohms impedance for audio and video purposes.

    IOW, "coaxial" is a cable TYPE.

    It can be used to pass various INFORMATION, or signals. Now, as far as what information these can pass, here's a brief primer.

    When outfitted with RCA plugs, this can be used for composite video signals, component video signals, digital audio signals, analog audio signals and pretty much anything else.

    When it's fitted with "F" connectors, it's usually used for CATV or OTA antenna signals.

    So, does this answer your question, or can you rephrase it to something more meaningful?
    Last edited: Mar 22, 2005
  3. gwhizz35 Enthusiast

    gwhizz35
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    Thanks for the explanation of what coaxial cable is. Let me try to rephrase my question. On my DVD player I notice component plugs as well as one coaxial plug. I have the component plugs running to my Denon receiver. I also have the Coaxial plug going to my Denon receiver as well. Do I need both? If so what's the purpose of coaxial?...for the sound?...I know the component is for video so what's the coax for? Plus I already have a right and left audio cable going to my receiver for sound..so again what's the coax for in this application?
  4. corysmith01 Senior Audioholic

    corysmith01
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    If I'm reading your post correctly, yes, you will need both. I believe what you're saying is that you have your component video cables hooked already (red, blue and green for video), but now you need audio. That's where the coaxial comes in. Of course, you could also do analog (L,R on the back of the DVD player to L,R on the receiver) but this would negate your surround effect. Your coaxial will be able to receive dolby signals, which should then be decoded by your receiver to send the proper information to your various speakers. Hopefully that's what you were looking for....components for video, coax (or optical) for audio.
  5. Privateer Full Audioholic

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    Do you have the manual? You should have the option of using your digital outputs on the DVD player. One will be optical and the other will be coax use the coax digital out on the DVD player. This is for your sound so you will run it to your digital input on your receiver. You might have to select some different options on your receiver to make sure everything in setup. Now for the video, run your component cables from the DVD player directly to your TV.
  6. gwhizz35 Enthusiast

    gwhizz35
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    thank you all for those answers. exactly what I needed. coax=sound..cool!
    i'm assuming then that the Right/Left audio outputs on the DVD player are for when I play CDs and stuff
  7. mtrycrafts Audioholic Slumlord

    mtrycrafts
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    Yes, you need or can use the component VIDEo out to your TV but you also need audio. Digital audio DD/DTS needs the coax cable. However, as indicated above, a coax will do both function, video and digital audio. Or, analog audio. Or, you can use a component video for the digital audio as well.

    If you use the the component video route, you do need three cables for it.
  8. Privateer Full Audioholic

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    No. The digital coax will carry all signals and will allow the receiver to do the decoding.
  9. AVRookie Audiophyte

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    Cable Question

    OK, here's a question.

    I am putting in a new home theatre system. My installer wants to put in three separate RG6 coax cables to serve as component video cables rather than buying a "bundled" component video cable. Each of the coax cables has a screw-on RCA connector on each end -- it screws into a connector of another type.

    Two questions:
    1. Is there any reason to be concerned about the three separate RG6 coax cables for component video?
    2. Should I be concerned about the screw-on RCA connectors -- do you need soldered terminations to get maximum signal quality?

    (BTW, this is for a HDTV.)

    If any of you gurus can help me on this one, that would be great ...
    Last edited: Mar 24, 2005
  10. rgriffin25 Moderator

    rgriffin25
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    I have used this configuration on an install before w/o any problems. Just be sure to get good quality cable that has good shielding.
  11. AVRookie Audiophyte

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    Rg6?

    Does an RG6 coaxial cable work?

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