Classix 2 Build

Discussion in 'DIY Corner - Tips & Techniques' started by MrBoat, Feb 25, 2017.

  1. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    No need to go into a full documented build because it's just like the millions of other speaker builds on the internet. I did use dados this time for the back and the corners. Baffle will get attached to the front of the cabinet sides. It doesn't call for a double baffle. This is more of a shop speaker anyway. I'll build them neatly, perhaps veneer the sides. See how they sound first.

    Crossovers are done. Test fired them with the drivers just to make sure it worked before and after soldering. [​IMG]

    I still figure it's worth buying the flat packs already done, other than perhaps the shipping part. But this one is worth whatever you can save on it budget wise. I spent the afternoon cutting the parts and putting the dados on. Used the circular saw with a straightedge to keep the fine dust outside.
    [​IMG]
  2. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    Did manage to get the main carcasses glued together. Figured to do it tomorrow but it only took like 15-20 mins to do them both.
    [​IMG]
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  3. TheWarrior Audioholic Field Marshall

    TheWarrior
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    I can see from the scarring you are using a table saw. Did you use a Dado for the joinery? How's it holding up on MDF? I've been surprised how well my router bit takes the abuse...
  4. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    That scar is likely a factory edge. I used a circular saw with a straightedge and two measurements to get the panels from the sheet. Router bits I use just enough (variable speed router) speed not to bog the router down, yet not so fast that the dust doesn't have enough time to get out of the way. Also, I do multiple depth approaches at a time to reach the target depth, in 1/8" increments. In other words, I treat the router bits as if they are 'not' carbide, even though that they are carbide bits.

    Even at my day job, my tools, power or otherwise, typically last 4:1 over everyone else's. This includes drill bits and everything else. Of course it also helps that I buy mostly all domestic offerings with names I have trusted for years if at all possible. Take bandsaw blades for instance. I have been using Lenox Flex-back blades for years. I cut aluminum with them every day and a single blade can last me 3 months or more. Yet if someone else at the shop uses it, they will roach it in one day, or even one use.
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  5. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    I managed to make good progress today, even though I started after 3 pm. Got the braces cut, sanded and installed, the baffles temporarily tacked in place and routed, port (rear port option) holes and binding post countersinks all done. Forgot to rout the edges of the baffles, as it was after dark when I was wrapping things up. I may do a different treatment with the baffles, depending on how these things sound.

    I decided against the plastic binding post cups that came with the kit and instead ordered some of the press in jobbies from Parts Express.

    Dry fit of the brace. I opted for plywood, being the braces are so small.
    [​IMG]

    Binding post recess and port tube.
    [​IMG]

    Flush mounted the drivers, with just the gasket of the woofers above grade, in the event I want to make some grilles that rely on that contact. I nailed the diameter of the driver recesses to within a coat of paint or two from a perfect fit.
    [​IMG]
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  6. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    I plugged in the crossovers to the drivers today after the solder job and everything still works!

    Amazing how much more it takes to get these things off their feet than the Tempests. I reckon it's a quick lesson with regard to speaker sensitivity differences. Geesh. . .I must not be using more than a few watts with the other monsters.
  7. lovinthehd Audioholic Spartan

    lovinthehd
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    LOL I know that feeling after soldering up a crossover....will it work?
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  8. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    Especially when you feel the parts get warm after the solder job.
  9. lovinthehd Audioholic Spartan

    lovinthehd
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    LOL didn't even try that.
  10. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    I recall in electronics school using heat sinks on certain components. Half way through, I recalled this, wondering if this is perhaps a step that gets left out of DIY and not remembering what it was we sink'd, or, if it was soldering speed dependent, deft touch being worth it's weight in gold perhaps, thinking. . . .did I just somewhat age these parts prematurely? I was pretty quick being I have done my fair share of soldering in the past but still. . . .it's something I could have googled, of all things. :D
  11. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    Ok well. . . . lol, I stayed up late tidying up loose ends and cutting out foam so I could audition these speakers. Coming right off the Tempests was a shock. I should have done it cold turkey. But, I warmed up to them quickly. I only have the baffles tacked on with brads so, that's a thing because, these cabinets damn sure need to be tight for these little woofs that could. The tweeters are as pleasant as described.

    What a pleasant little pair of speakers. Things like congas, cowbell, the little trips up and down the fret board of a bass guitar has me looking over saying, "Really, Shorty?" lol

    If someone tried to criticize these speakers with some sort of audiophillic snobbery, I swear you'd be tempted to put them in a side headlock and noogie their head until they stopped with such foolishness.

    Thanks for suggesting these, lovinthehd. These are going to be fun. The bass is surprising on their own and yet they sound great with the sub too.

    I can see why Paul Carmody digs these little speakers. In even a stretched out near field situation they would be hard to beat with speakers that make you feel musically good.

    I strongly suggest these to anyone that has days where they don't want to be analytical or mess with any settings or has 'off' ear days. I may have to build another pair of these for work.

    I'll update as I finish these off. I am undecided what I want to do with them still. I'm glad I at least put different binding posts that will accept banana plugs. I see perhaps a sealed 10" sub in their future as well.
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  12. slipperybidness Audioholic Spartan

    slipperybidness
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    If you are reasonably quick and efficient on the soldering, then there isn't much to fear on that. If you have to de-solder/re-solder, that's when you really start running the risk on frying a component. And, for crossovers where a decent AWG can absorb some heat, I'm not too worried about it.

    About the only time I worry about clipping on my heat-sink is when I'm soldering ICs. Those tend to be a bit more fragile as compared to most passive components.

    And, the only time I recall frying anything was when removing SMDs. Easier to fry them b/c they are tiny. But, when I fry it b/c I'm removing it, then it was invariably for an upgrade mod anyway so I simply didn't care about the existing part getting removed.
  13. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    By the time the leads are through the board and to where they are going, they are long enough anyway. It went quickly. It just struck me funny to think about the what if it didn't work part.
  14. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    Adding some walnut veneer.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    These speakers are odd. If you hook them up, you'll just listen to them without analyzing them. Doesn't matter if you have better ones or not. You'll just find that you have no good reason to get up to switch them out. Next day, same thing. They're already hooked up so, why not? lol

    I unhooked them to finish them, hooked the Tempests up and for sure they crush these in just about every way but these things are downright pleasant to listen to!
    Last edited: Mar 12, 2017
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  15. MrBoat Audioholic General

    MrBoat
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    Finally finished. Now all I have left to do (for now) is put some skins and paint on that subwoofer.:)

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    These have a generous amount of bass to them. Nice overall tone. Should really sound good in my bedroom.
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